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Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS Released, Makes Use Of Ubuntu 17.10's Kernel/Mesa Stack

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  • Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS Released, Makes Use Of Ubuntu 17.10's Kernel/Mesa Stack

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS Released, Makes Use Of Ubuntu 17.10's Kernel/Mesa Stack

    After being delayed due to Spectre and Meltdown with the Canonical developers busy mitigating those CPU security vulnerabilities, the Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS release was rolled out a few minutes ago...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...4-LTS-Released

  • #2
    But it's important to note that this Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS stack doesn't include AMDGPU DC for working with Raven Ridge / Vega, there isn't the official Intel Coffee Lake graphics support, etc. For that you will need to be rolling your own packages or relying upon the popular third-party PPAs.
    Or wait 3 months after 18.04 for the final 16.04 HWE or 4+ if another Meltdown/Spectre catastrophe appear

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    • #3
      I helped somebody upgrade from 16,04 Unity to 17.10 gnome and he did not like gnome (intel graphics slow?) and wanted to reinstall 16.04. I convinced him to keep 17.10 and use Unity. It was in discord never met the person and they said they wanted to upgrade to 17.10. Wish i knew about this... Like I knew about it, just that I didn't know it was releasing today.

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      • #4
        Perfect example of how frozen distros are an outdated model. If you can change the most core parts of your system you can change all parts after proper testing. Something like manjaro's rolling release model would be the best choice for mainstream use, with update packs maybe once a month that get extensive automated testing before being rolled out.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
          Perfect example of how frozen distros are an outdated model. If you can change the most core parts of your system you can change all parts after proper testing. Something like manjaro's rolling release model would be the best choice for mainstream use, with update packs maybe once a month that get extensive automated testing before being rolled out.
          I switched to Manjaro after using Debian, Ubuntu, and Mint for years and I largely agree with you. But, I wouldn't recommend Manjaro for newbies because it occasionally does break in minor ways. For example, I had a weird GCC update problem that required a manual remove and install of an alternate library before applying the next Manjaro update. I found help on the Manjaro forums (and understood what to do) but Linux newbies would have been lost. And note, this library issue (or whatever it was) wasn't of my own making. It somehow happened as part of the normal Manjaro install and update process.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
            Perfect example of how frozen distros are an outdated model. If you can change the most core parts of your system you can change all parts after proper testing. Something like manjaro's rolling release model would be the best choice for mainstream use, with update packs maybe once a month that get extensive automated testing before being rolled out.
            They aren't. For me, a perfect disto includes a stable set of core components (thus it cannot be a rolling release distro) and the most recent stable software on top of it. With Hardware Enablement Stack, we almost get precisely that.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MVinhas View Post
              They aren't. For me, a perfect disto includes a stable set of core components (thus it cannot be a rolling release distro) and the most recent stable software on top of it. With Hardware Enablement Stack, we almost get precisely that.
              Wrong. Apart from Firefox and Thunderbird, Ubuntu does not receive any application updates.

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              • #8
                True that, the stable set includes almost all applications
                Related are LTS distros with a rolling desktop : KDE Neon, or before that LMDE 2 by Mint which is debian stable jessie and had either Mate or Cinnamon updated (I think further updates will be on LMDE 3, with GTK 3.22 while jessie was stuck on older GTK3!)
                The Mint 17.x and 18.x versions are in that vein.
                You can deliberately use Mint 18.1 I think if you want to keep the last GTK2 Mate version (and use the HWE packages corresponding to Ubuntu 16.04.4 stuff, should be fine and not too frankenstein if your hardware likes it)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MVinhas View Post

                  They aren't. For me, a perfect disto includes a stable set of core components (thus it cannot be a rolling release distro) and the most recent stable software on top of it. With Hardware Enablement Stack, we almost get precisely that.
                  Except you get outdated programs and a changing core system. The worst of both worlds.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Viking73 View Post

                    I switched to Manjaro after using Debian, Ubuntu, and Mint for years and I largely agree with you. But, I wouldn't recommend Manjaro for newbies because it occasionally does break in minor ways. For example, I had a weird GCC update problem that required a manual remove and install of an alternate library before applying the next Manjaro update. I found help on the Manjaro forums (and understood what to do) but Linux newbies would have been lost. And note, this library issue (or whatever it was) wasn't of my own making. It somehow happened as part of the normal Manjaro install and update process.
                    This is true, but if a large distro like ubuntu would adopt this model, run testing farms, do QA like opensuse before each update pack, i am confident everything could be made smooth. Manjaro is probably one of the smallest popular distro projects with absolutely no excess manpower.

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