Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Features To Look Forward To With Wine 3.0

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • johanb
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
    I don't use WINE because I like my system to be a pure x64 installation without any 32bit libraries. That means not enabling multiarch on Debian-based distributions, and never pulling any *.i686 packages in RPM-based distributions. Which makes WINE all but useless in my computer.

    Pity, because I want to play some old eroge that I bought some four years ago. Only works on Windows, but I don't want to pay for Windows, so I'll do the right thing and live without it (no pirating).
    Firstly, you could install a lightweight linux distro in a VM to run lightweight wine games if you don't want to make your root dirty with 32-bit libraries and don't care about HDD space.

    Secondly, screw you for making me google "eroge" while at work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    I don't use WINE because I like my system to be a pure x64 installation without any 32bit libraries. That means not enabling multiarch on Debian-based distributions, and never pulling any *.i686 packages in RPM-based distributions. Which makes WINE all but useless in my computer.

    Pity, because I want to play some old eroge that I bought some four years ago. Only works on Windows, but I don't want to pay for Windows, so I'll do the right thing and live without it (no pirating).

    Leave a comment:


  • OneBitUser
    replied
    Originally posted by Dukenukemx View Post
    Been thinking about this, and probably the best way forward at this point is something similar to Gallium Nine. Think about it like this. Who can use Vulkan? Mac users currently don't have Vulkan, and who knows if they'll ever get it. Android does have it, but kinda not really. Windows is Windows so that leaves us with Linux. The Geforce 400 and 500 series can't do Vulkan, and the Radeon HD 5000 and 6000 series can't do Vulkan either. Yet, they can all do Direct X11. Right now those users can get more benefits from Gallium Nine than Vulkan, and their hardware can probably use all the performance boost they can get. The same can be said if there was a Gallium 11, considering these cards had no problem with Directx11.

    The benefits from pursuing the Vulkan API is for newer Geforce owners since Nvidia refuses to support open source, and Intel users cause Intel doesn't use Gallium for some reason. Vulkan does make sense for DirectX12 since all DX12 capable cards would also benefit from Vulkan.
    I think that deciding development priorities and directions based on the capabilities of 6-7 years old hardware is a huge mistake. And mind you, we are talking about graphics cards, which typically do not work on till the end of times.
    Any owners still on HD 5000-6000 and GTX 400-500 (or even older) series cards should already be contemplating an upgrade based on raw performance alone.
    These cards typically have 1-2GB RAM at most, and you can replace them with better performing models from the current low-end.
    Also, with most of these older cards having been used for 6-7 years, their reliability is a crapshot by this time.

    Leave a comment:


  • pal666
    replied
    Originally posted by mozo View Post
    Double post, edited.
    Originally posted by mozo View Post
    Double post, edited.
    stack overflow

    Leave a comment:


  • pal666
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael_S View Post
    (Edit: On the bright side, Blizzard is a DRM-focused company that isn't interested in Linux support. So I guess I should be grateful that I've lost access the single most anti-Linux program I use. )
    consider not giving them money next time

    Leave a comment:


  • Dukenukemx
    replied
    Been thinking about this, and probably the best way forward at this point is something similar to Gallium Nine. Think about it like this. Who can use Vulkan? Mac users currently don't have Vulkan, and who knows if they'll ever get it. Android does have it, but kinda not really. Windows is Windows so that leaves us with Linux. The Geforce 400 and 500 series can't do Vulkan, and the Radeon HD 5000 and 6000 series can't do Vulkan either. Yet, they can all do Direct X11. Right now those users can get more benefits from Gallium Nine than Vulkan, and their hardware can probably use all the performance boost they can get. The same can be said if there was a Gallium 11, considering these cards had no problem with Directx11.

    The benefits from pursuing the Vulkan API is for newer Geforce owners since Nvidia refuses to support open source, and Intel users cause Intel doesn't use Gallium for some reason. Vulkan does make sense for DirectX12 since all DX12 capable cards would also benefit from Vulkan.

    Leave a comment:


  • mozo
    replied
    Originally posted by Xaero_Vincent View Post

    I'd be interested to know how well these perform compared to Windows in Wine. I mean obviously the Witcher 3 is running poor but Wolfenstein is using Vulkan in Wine, so I wonder how it compares to Vulkan on Windows, since it's not doing a API translation.
    I made a video:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbDPa9p_1Ac&t=2s

    It performs flawless. I don't use Windows to compare but this performance is more than enough. Today I have completed the game.

    Leave a comment:


  • boltronics
    replied
    Originally posted by OneBitUser View Post

    That's a shame... I was just getting into the mood to try Starcraft 2, now that it has become free-to-play. Love that universe and it's story.

    I use Wine mostly via Play on Linux so that I can play GOG versions of games that I loved as a kid. I only buy games on GOG or Steam that either have a Linux version or can be made to run in Wine. I only buy non-Linux software on GOG, so out of my two criteria (DRM free and Linux Native) I always satisfy at least one.
    StarCraft II runs with recent releases of Wine Staging. I didn't play an actual match to see how well (it was a bit too slow for my Radeon HD 5870), but it got the menu and there were no rendering or audio problems that far at least.

    Leave a comment:


  • Xaero_Vincent
    replied
    Originally posted by mozo View Post
    Prey 2017 runs perfect:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orCfrjxNCag&t=1s
    Alredy completed.

    Witcher 3 has some performance issues but I competed it too:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m9sThxTXHUM&t=125s

    Crysis 2 and Crysis 3 runs perfect, also completed:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pq3R_NtQTXM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMe_nU_NCqk&t=159s

    All Wolfenstein plus the newest Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKItS0TP328
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbDPa9p_1Ac&t=2s

    And many, many more.

    Michael, do you check what you are writing today
    I'd be interested to know how well these perform compared to Windows in Wine. I mean obviously the Witcher 3 is running poor but Wolfenstein is using Vulkan in Wine, so I wonder how it compares to Vulkan on Windows, since it's not doing a API translation.

    Leave a comment:


  • ssorgatem
    replied
    Originally posted by johanb View Post

    It does?
    I played it back in the day when it still had a OpenGL backend available on Windows and it worked fine, I just assumed that it was broken after they forced DX11. Maybe I should give it a try again.
    Yep.
    I bought it cheap (~6€), installed it on Windows and I was prepared to have to dual boot...
    But then I tried launching it from wine... and it worked.

    So I ended up moving tje whole thing (~100Gb) to a proper filesystem instead of NTFS and it actually loads much much faster on wine than on Windows.

    It even plays nice with the native Steam overlay and Steam Controller, even streaming to a Steam Link.

    In fact, I've had fewer problems with the controller support and game crashes than my wife playing on Windows 10 😜


    If you come back to the game and happen to play on the EU server, feel free to add me ssorgatem

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X