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Wine 2.22 Brings Improved 64-bit ARM Support

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  • Wine 2.22 Brings Improved 64-bit ARM Support

    Phoronix: Wine 2.22 Brings Improved 64-bit ARM Support

    Wine 2.22 is now available as the latest development release of this program to run Windows games/applications on Linux and other operating systems...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-2.22-Released

  • #2
    Typo:

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    improvements to ARM64 (AArch64 / 64-bit AR)M support

    Comment


    • #3
      How could wine ever support ARM. They would have to emulate x86

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      • #4
        Why would they have to do that?
        Wine Is Not an Emulator

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Guy1524 View Post
          How could wine ever support ARM. They would have to emulate x86
          Windows also runs on ARM (and did support MIPS and Alpha at a time). x86 Emulation is part of Windows 10 (or will be, dont follow MS endeavors closely).

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Slithery View Post
            Why would they have to do that?
            Wine Is Not an Emulator
            what if windows runs natively on aarch64 cpus (hint: snapdragon) ?

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            • #7
              Windows NT in its lifetime has supported Intel, MIPS, Alpha and even PowerPC. Yes, Windows 10 for tablets will support ARM via the Snapdragon 835. And it will have native support for x86 applications written for Windows. It's not clear how MSFT will support those applications to run well on the ARM platform.

              You have to take MSFT's support for alternative CPU's with a grain of salt. When the NT kernel came out it only supported Intel (due to overall market share) and MIPS due to its large use in the scientific community and to prove their kernel was multi-platform. Digital Equipment paid for the Alpha port and Motorola paid for the PowerPC port, just as Qualcomm paid for the Snapdragon port. Lack of x86 support kept it niche in the server space. Motorola came out with a NT based POWER Workstation, but again, lack of x86 support kept it fairly niche and marginal. Some credit the Motorola/Windows expenditure as the beginning of the end of Motorola. When cell phone profits plummeted, they pulled the plug on the whole POWER Windows and spun off their fab unit into what became Freescale.

              While Big Bill hated Scott McNealy in the old days, we used to hear of a SPARC port of the kernel way back when that never left the lab. We used to tease our MSFT reps that if they port NT to SPARC, then McNealy must have cut a truce with Bill. I doubt it ever happened.

              IBM did perform a port of OS2 Warp to Power but the Win32 layer didn't perform all that well. We were asked to test a new PowerPC that was supposed to integrate IBM 486SLC silicon with a POWER CPU to speed up the Win32 parts. I think it was the POWER 835 or something to that effect. We never saw it and OS/2 on PowerPC never went any further. Besides the AIX team was playing politics.

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              • #8
                The truth is that companies encrypt their binaries so you cannot represent the source and recompile them. You need to do that on the fly, on runtime as they decrypt parts them selves. That costs but you can always cache the outcome for future use. I believe that all the parts for efficient binary converting are here, we just need some glue. Also i believe that someone will try when smartphones achieve a Teraflop, my Snapdragon_820 does have 0,5TF. http://kyokojap.myweb.hinet.net/gpu_gflops/
                Last edited by artivision; 11-25-2017, 06:48 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by edwaleni View Post
                  Windows NT in its lifetime has supported Intel, MIPS, Alpha and even PowerPC. Yes, Windows 10 for tablets will support ARM via the Snapdragon 835. And it will have native support for x86 applications written for Windows. It's not clear how MSFT will support those applications to run well on the ARM platform.

                  You have to take MSFT's support for alternative CPU's with a grain of salt. When the NT kernel came out it only supported Intel (due to overall market share) and MIPS due to its large use in the scientific community and to prove their kernel was multi-platform. Digital Equipment paid for the Alpha port and Motorola paid for the PowerPC port, just as Qualcomm paid for the Snapdragon port. Lack of x86 support kept it niche in the server space. Motorola came out with a NT based POWER Workstation, but again, lack of x86 support kept it fairly niche and marginal. Some credit the Motorola/Windows expenditure as the beginning of the end of Motorola. When cell phone profits plummeted, they pulled the plug on the whole POWER Windows and spun off their fab unit into what became Freescale.

                  While Big Bill hated Scott McNealy in the old days, we used to hear of a SPARC port of the kernel way back when that never left the lab. We used to tease our MSFT reps that if they port NT to SPARC, then McNealy must have cut a truce with Bill. I doubt it ever happened.

                  IBM did perform a port of OS2 Warp to Power but the Win32 layer didn't perform all that well. We were asked to test a new PowerPC that was supposed to integrate IBM 486SLC silicon with a POWER CPU to speed up the Win32 parts. I think it was the POWER 835 or something to that effect. We never saw it and OS/2 on PowerPC never went any further. Besides the AIX team was playing politics.
                  It wasn't AIX playing politics so much as Intel shipping Pentium I.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by artivision View Post
                    The truth is that companies encrypt their binaries so you cannot represent the source and recompile them. You need to do that on the fly, on runtime as they decrypt parts them selves. That costs but you can always cache the outcome for future use. I believe that all the parts for efficient binary converting are here, we just need some glue. Also i believe that someone will try when smartphones achieve a Teraflop, my Snapdragon_820 does have 0,5TF. http://kyokojap.myweb.hinet.net/gpu_gflops/
                    What do your GPU flips have to do with dynarecing? Because of how dynarecing works it's not something that you can really massively parallelize. A dynarec is going to run entirely on your CPU.

                    ​​​​​​As for other people's questions, the Wine ARM support is useful for 4 reasons:
                    1) For pumping Wine through Qemu to run x86 Win32 apps on ARM devices
                    2) For running older ARM Win32 apps meant for Windows CE.
                    3) For running newer ARM Win32 apps meant for "Windows 10 on ARM" devices.
                    4) For a Future where Wine may support UWP apps, and needs to be able to understand ARM binaries.

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