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Piper Has Turned Into A Very Competent Mouse Configuration UI For Linux

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Cape View Post
    Nice! Nice and juicy!

    GTK is looking very nice as of lately and it seems that Jente did a good job on the overall UX. Looks productive and in-line with the rest of the GNOME system.

    ​​​​
    I am all for more stylish, but aligned = better.
    This is something I've felt have been a bit forgotten in linux, a good addition

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    • #12
      Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
      keeping with linux tradition, this is just a GUI for GUI-agnostic backend you can find here https://github.com/libratbag/libratbag

      But afaik there should be no reason for this to not work as-is in KDE too, just like any other GTK application.
      As long as you use an distribution that uses systemd there should be no problem.
      Libratbag needs libsystemd.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by awesz View Post
        No, it's a mouse configuration UI for GNOME. Does anybody know a mouse cfg GUI that's DE agnostic?
        You think normal mice allow you to set dpi and remap buttons?

        This is a GUI to configure some gaming mice, and most gaming configuration GUIs are DE agnostic because they set mice settings that are not even OS-specific.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          You think normal mice allow you to set dpi and remap buttons?

          This is a GUI to configure some gaming mice, and most gaming configuration GUIs are DE agnostic because they set mice settings that are not even OS-specific.
          Obviously I know it's a gaming mice configurator, since I have one. And no, Piper is not DE agnostic since it uses header bar and has a space-wasting design. Thanks Allan Day!

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Nille_kungen View Post
            As long as you use an distribution that uses systemd there should be no problem.
            Libratbag needs libsystemd.
            Technically speaking, it just uses libsystemd for dbus functionality.
            https://github.com/libratbag/libratbag/issues/239

            So as long as you can install libsystemd (which is just a library containing stuff used by the programs in the systemd project, but per-se isn't doing anything) you're fine.

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            • #16
              Hmm, my Roccat Kiro is not explicitly supported yet. OPPORTUNITY TO DO SOMETHING USEFUL DETECTED.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by GhostOfFunkS View Post
                Great work. Thanks Jente. Thanks RH and GNOME.
                And thanks Obama. Never forget to thank Obama.

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                • #18
                  Can it change the mouse wheel scroll speed?

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                  • #19
                    Finally, a Mouse Configuration UI For Linux ! THIS will be the Year of The Linux Desktop for sure !

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by lbalbalba View Post
                      Finally, a Mouse Configuration UI For Linux ! THIS will be the Year of The Linux Desktop for sure !
                      Originally posted by randomizer View Post
                      Can it change the mouse wheel scroll speed?
                      You guys might have misunderstood what this tool is. It doesn't do anything to the mouse configuration on the desktop. It is reprogramming the device itself for the supported mice. The mouse hardware then behaves differently afterwards, the sensor runs at different resolution, the buttons do something else. To change things like pointer acceleration, scroll wheel behavior etc., you still need to see what your desktop environment's settings tool offers for that (and check what the programs you use offer to configure the scroll wheel, like using an scroll tweak extension in your web browser).

                      The part in the video about changing what the buttons do might be a bit misleading, I guess? What the tool can do for changing the buttons events or putting keyboard macros on buttons of the mouse, the way this works is that the mouse hardware itself has to be able to do all that stuff. For example with some of the Logitech mice, when you look at "xinput" or "lsusb -t" you'll see the Logitech thingy shows up as two devices. The second device is a keyboard and the mouse uses it to play back keyboard macros without any help from software.

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