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Fedora Continues Working On Better NVIDIA Support, PipeWire Could Replace PulseAudio

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  • Fedora Continues Working On Better NVIDIA Support, PipeWire Could Replace PulseAudio

    Phoronix: Fedora Continues Working On Better NVIDIA Support, PipeWire Could Replace PulseAudio

    Christian Schaller of Red Hat has provided an update on some of the feature work that's coming around the corner with Fedora Workstation 26 and other work to land in the future...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...pdate-NV-WL-Qt

  • #2
    Very happy to see they're taking professional audio seriously, big thanks to Wim Taymans for taking on the task. This is incredibly ambitious, looking to not only match PulseAudio's use cases (which are numerous) but also to take on JACK's use cases (equally numerous, but in a different way). I'm guessing it'll also include in-framework decoding support (like Core Audio/Core Video on OS X), which would simplify many media applications.

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    • #3
      I tried Fedora a few months ago, and left quickly when installing the Nvidia driver quickly became a nightmare. I quickly was back running Ubuntu Gnome. Glad to hear they are working on improving things with working with the Nvidia driver.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by audi.rs4 View Post
        I tried Fedora a few months ago, and left quickly when installing the Nvidia driver quickly became a nightmare. I quickly was back running Ubuntu Gnome. Glad to hear they are working on improving things with working with the Nvidia driver.
        I haven't tried Fedora in a while (except in VM), but iirc all it took was go into CLI, kill gdm/sddm/whatever, run installer from Nvidia. Not the best experience, yet only a nightmare for those unfamiliar with the CLI, I would think.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by microcode View Post
          I'm guessing it'll also include in-framework decoding support (like Core Audio/Core Video on OS X), which would simplify many media applications.
          I'm quite sure they won't directly touch decoding/encoding as GStreamer is meant for that...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by audi.rs4 View Post
            I tried Fedora a few months ago, and left quickly when installing the Nvidia driver quickly became a nightmare. I quickly was back running Ubuntu Gnome. Glad to hear they are working on improving things with working with the Nvidia driver.
            If you had "quickly" updated and rebooted before installing binary blobs that need kernel headers ...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by quikee View Post
              I'm quite sure they won't directly touch decoding/encoding as GStreamer is meant for that...
              That would be unfortunate, since there are good reasons. Lots of hardware has hardware decoding support, and I figure it should be more or less the same thing to play an encoded stream or a raw one.

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              • #8
                If Nvidia won't implement PRIME fully (i mean PRIME offloading of course) Optimus will be always pain on Linux. Bumblebee isn't solution - it is only workaround, not solution (for example - no Vulkan support). Nvidia offical "solution" isn't good too - using only Nvidia GPU in hybrid system hasn't got any sense (it will reduce battery use time and increase temperatures).

                If Nvidia won't fix it this is my last hybrid system with their GPU. AMDGPU looks pretty good now.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by audi.rs4 View Post
                  I tried Fedora a few months ago, and left quickly when installing the Nvidia driver quickly became a nightmare. I quickly was back running Ubuntu Gnome. Glad to hear they are working on improving things with working with the Nvidia driver.
                  This should be a thing of the past now, if you go to negativo17 and install the NVidia repo there you should be able to go into GNOME Software and install the NVidia driver without needing to do anything else.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by audi.rs4 View Post
                    I tried Fedora a few months ago, and left quickly when installing the Nvidia driver quickly became a nightmare. I quickly was back running Ubuntu Gnome. Glad to hear they are working on improving things with working with the Nvidia driver.
                    Several months ago when Fedora upgraded the Linux kernel (I think it was 4.10), the NVIDIA driver did not have support for it right away. I was forced to boot the older kernel until NVIDIA added support for 4.10.

                    Maybe you had the bad luck to try Fedora in this window.

                    PS. because of such issues with NVIDIA, I bought an AMD card that works without proprietary drivers and am not going to buy NVIDIA in the foreseeable future.

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