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Ubuntu 17.10 Enables PIE Across All Architectures, Improves Secure Boot

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  • Ubuntu 17.10 Enables PIE Across All Architectures, Improves Secure Boot

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 17.10 Enables PIE Across All Architectures, Improves Secure Boot

    Plenty of changes are taking place for Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" beyond just transitioning from Unity to GNOME...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...PIE-SecureBoot

  • #2
    Python 3.6 is really nice, because it have string literals.

    Code:
    >>> name = 'Fred'
    >>> age = 50
    >>> f'My name is {name}, my age next year is {age+1}.
    'My name is Fred, my age next year is 51.'
    Much nicer than
    Code:
    'My name is ' + name + ', my age next year is ' + age + 1 + '.'
    # or
    'My name is %s, my age is %d' % (name, age)
    # or string.format
    string.format('My name is %s, my age is %d', name, age)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
      Python 3.6 is really nice, because it have string literals.

      Code:
      >>> name = 'Fred'
      >>> age = 50
      >>> f'My name is {name}, my age next year is {age+1}.
      'My name is Fred, my age next year is 51.'
      Much nicer than
      Code:
      'My name is ' + name + ', my age next year is ' + age + 1 + '.'
      # or
      'My name is %s, my age is %d' % (name, age)
      # or string.format
      string.format('My name is %s, my age is %d', name, age)
      I believe you mean rich strings.

      Is this the default python now?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bug77 View Post
        I believe you mean rich strings.
        I've never heard that term before and, if I encountered it out of context, I'd expect the "rich" to be referring to some kind of specialized support for bold/italic/etc.

        The PEP calls them "f-strings" and everyone else seems to be referring to them as "formatted string literals". (My first impulse would be to call them "format literals" for short.)

        Is the "rich strings" name a Ruby thing? (I ask because I know Ruby has them and it's the most popular language I've avoided.)
        Last edited by ssokolow; 06-16-2017, 08:39 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          I think I've heard first in Groovy context. Though that says little about its origins.

          Comment


          • #6
            More and more platforms now enforce position independent code/executables.
            Does that mean FFmpeg will have to (re-)consider supporting ASM without text relocation ?

            https://trac.ffmpeg.org/ticket/4928

            "We'll not be rewriting our entire ASM code to be slower and less maintainable, sorry."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

              I've never heard that term before and, if I encountered it out of context, I'd expect the "rich" to be referring to some kind of specialized support for bold/italic/etc.

              The PEP calls them "f-strings" and everyone else seems to be referring to them as "formatted string literals". (My first impulse would be to call them "format literals" for short.)

              Is the "rich strings" name a Ruby thing? (I ask because I know Ruby has them and it's the most popular language I've avoided.)
              String literal means in Python any string defined in code. Formatted string literals is probably fine but f-strings is common

              Comment


              • #8
                This PIE stuff sounds like silly security theatre that just causes inconvenience for developers. What a waste of time.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by wagaf View Post
                  More and more platforms now enforce position independent code/executables.
                  Does that mean FFmpeg will have to (re-)consider supporting ASM without text relocation ?

                  https://trac.ffmpeg.org/ticket/4928

                  "We'll not be rewriting our entire ASM code to be slower and less maintainable, sorry."
                  More likely to fade into oblivion. 60k lines of assembly is scary.

                  In the meantime, VLC works fine by just disabling libmpeg2 (mpeg 1 and 2 decoding).

                  https://trac.videolan.org/vlc/ticket/15502

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Improvements to Secure Boot would be either turning it off (the user option for which is so far mandatory per Microsoft for systems with the Windows sticker program, at least on x86 PCs) or finding some way of keeping it on and letting your computer boot into Linux without having to ask Microsoft's permission.

                    The way Secure Boot on Linux works now is that there's a Microsoft "blessed binary" called shim that loads GRUB. The shim is signed by Microsoft and that signature can be revoked. This situation is not acceptable.

                    Does anyone happen to know if computers from Dell with Ubuntu loaded or System76 have a Secure Boot key in the BIOS that allows Linux to boot using Secure Boot with a non-Microsoft key?

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