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Ring Joins The GNU, Aims For Decentralized, Multi-Device Communication

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  • Ring Joins The GNU, Aims For Decentralized, Multi-Device Communication

    Phoronix: Ring Joins The GNU, Aims For Decentralized, Multi-Device Communication

    Ring is now the newest GNU software project. Ring aims to be a universal communication software platform respecting user's freedoms and privacy. GNU Ring doesn't rely upon a centralized server and is based upon SFLPhone SIP/IAX2-compatible softphone for communication, far different from Skype...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-First-Release

  • #2
    a decentralized username registry
    Internet website names / DNS-systems could use this too!

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    • #3
      Why not a demonstration of GNU Ring?

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      • #4
        And I get this message after submitting my post:

        Code:
        {"nodeId":909347}

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        • #5
          Cool. I tried ring some time ago, it was quite unstable back then but I'm looking forward to it.

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          • #6
            Well, good that there are alternatives. Although, I myself is looking into tox more. qTox works quite well these days. And they have better security than other networks. E.g. there isn't even unsecure legacy mode like in Ring to communicated to e.g. other SIP servers.

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            • #7
              I'll continue to use skype like all corporations do. GNU Ring sounds like something coded by people living in their mother's basement. There is a reason skype was purchased for 8 billion dollars and Ring is free. Price is signal for quality.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GraysonPeddie View Post
                Why not a demonstration of GNU Ring?
                I have tested Ring extensively on my 4 devices (laptop, desktop, phone, tablet). It works flawlessly for me. The interface is modern and easy, and the audio/video quality is decent. At least in the Linux desktop client, one can even tune the video quality (or resolution, I don't remember) by simply moving a slider WHILE YOU ARE IN THE CALL! You can also toggle on/off recording of audio/video during the call. Overall, it is really nice, and I'm super happy that they joined the GNU project (this last statement is only my very personal taste).

                The only hiccup I faced with Ring was network problems on some public WiFi's, where the router supposedly blocked some ports that Ring used for establishing the connection. If they can find a way around this network issue, I would say it is perfectly fine for day-to-day use by everyone.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Master5000 View Post
                  Ignore me. I can't do anything other than troll.
                  You got it!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DanL View Post

                    You got it!
                    He cant even do that well, look at his troll bar.

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