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KDE Neon: The Rock & Roll Distribution

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  • KDE Neon: The Rock & Roll Distribution

    Phoronix: KDE Neon: The Rock & Roll Distribution

    What does it mean when developers behind one of the world's most popular desktop environments decide to jump into the deep end and fork a distribution? Depending on who you ask you'll hear madness, excellence, confusion, and excitement as onlookers figure out the exact nature of a new breed of beast and guess what it will do.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=23315

  • #2
    Too bad I hate rock and roll, although that doesn't say anything about Neon or KDE.

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    • #3
      its a shame that its imcompatible to PPA because idiots changed the LSB Release stuff. also its nit that coob becuase of the ubuntu base system. its still ubuntu patched mesa.

      for me the best "KDE Neon" ist Manjaro: because of good updatepolitics but not to bleeding edge. and you can choose your kernel yourself

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      • #4
        I do agree that not using the Manjaro / Chakra / Netrunner Rolling thing going on was a mistake. But the problem on the Arch-side is that I cannot imagine ever calling something "user edition" without mandatory access control at all, and Arch has none, and there is no straightforward way to get it working. Arch itself makes grsec available, but there is no RBAC policies package and naturally Arch packages never ship MAC profiles by default when the distro itself never ships MAC.

        MAC is one of the killer security features of the Linux desktop for almost everyone we want using it, and while Arch is the best at everything else, it still has that giant blemish that makes it impossible to recommend.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by zanny View Post
          I do agree that not using the Manjaro / Chakra / Netrunner Rolling thing going on was a mistake. But the problem on the Arch-side is that I cannot imagine ever calling something "user edition" without mandatory access control at all, and Arch has none, and there is no straightforward way to get it working. Arch itself makes grsec available, but there is no RBAC policies package and naturally Arch packages never ship MAC profiles by default when the distro itself never ships MAC.

          MAC is one of the killer security features of the Linux desktop for almost everyone we want using it, and while Arch is the best at everything else, it still has that giant blemish that makes it impossible to recommend.
          https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Project:Hardened

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          • #6
            Originally posted by zanny View Post
            I do agree that not using the Manjaro / Chakra / Netrunner Rolling thing going on was a mistake. But the problem on the Arch-side is that I cannot imagine ever calling something "user edition" without mandatory access control at all, and Arch has none, and there is no straightforward way to get it working. Arch itself makes grsec available, but there is no RBAC policies package and naturally Arch packages never ship MAC profiles by default when the distro itself never ships MAC.

            MAC is one of the killer security features of the Linux desktop for almost everyone we want using it, and while Arch is the best at everything else, it still has that giant blemish that makes it impossible to recommend.
            You're one of the first people to actually make a comment about MACs in Arch that I've seen. I was kind of curious for a while how/if people dealt with MACs in Arch, but it seems like a large majority of people don't even bother with it (and judging by a small poll, don't even care for it on a desktop OS), which is a little concerning.

            Ubuntu, openSUSE, Fedora, and afaik basically every other major distro comes with some kind of MAC (AppArmor or SELinux usually). It seems like something people should want, but largely ignored on Arch...

            The difficulty with setting up a MAC is what made me leave Arch. openSUSE TW works for me in its place considering it's both rolling and includes AppArmor out-the-box.

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            • #7
              It's great to see that Ubuntu-users will be able to get a decent Plasma 5 experience now... You definitely don't want to get stuck on the older Qt libraries and frameworks - that means months more of unpatched/non-backported bug fixes . As soon as the 3 Plasma layers are released - I'm pulling them in on my Gentoo install. My experience mirrors the authors - that stability is slowly increasing and the remaining paper-cut bugs are getting fixed. Yes I'm drinking the Kool-aiDE

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              • #8
                So, the project leads have gone out of their way a few times to say that Neon is *not* a distribution.

                In any case, the thing they don't tell you is that because Neon provides an updated version of QT, all the software in the Ubuntu repository that relies on the old QT version is permanently broken, see: https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=362917

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                • #9
                  When the distro you can never advocate muggles use because of the whole "compile everything yourself" process has much better security solutions than Arch, you know you got a problem!

                  The difficulty with setting up a MAC is what made me leave Arch. openSUSE TW works for me in its place considering it's both rolling and includes AppArmor out-the-box.
                  At the end of the day MAC is fairly anti-KISS. It requires packagers to actually pay attention and provide MAC profiles, and the problem in Arch is that no one person (or even a group of volunteers) could reasonably be expected to audit *every* Arch package for all their file accesses and create profiles for them.

                  The only way to ever see working MAC on Arch and its derivatives will require one of them to force MAC on, break everything, and have the users report back the file accesses and then assemble profiles off that, possibly cross-referencing the Fedora / Suse / Ubuntu profiles, but that requires way too much interest that the entire family of distros has consistently shown total apathy for.

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                  • #10
                    I've never been a fan of KDE in general, though I respect the sheer amount of work and (mostly) quality apps that they produce. I tried out the Neon Users distro just a few days ago, and it seems pretty decent apart from the corrupted fonts and garbled video streams that all Ubuntu based distros suffer on my main machine (Gigabyte Z97m-DS3H/GeForce GTX 750 Ti). I too found the lack of K-apps intriguing, and performance-wise it was smooth and highly usable.

                    Oh, and by the way Michael, it's "smorgasbord" unless you were deliberately/ironically going for an absurd misspelling.

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