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A Brief Look At Fedora 24

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Ericg View Post

    It's not the default, no. The plan is still for Fedora 25 (though obviously that can change). I wanted to test it out on Fedora 24 because it was supposed to be 90% of the way there. So far, every game I've tested has worked, which was my biggest "No-Go" with F23, so I'll likely run Wayland full time now.
    The plan in Fedora Workstation has always been "Wayland will become the default after it has been non-default but experiencing no critical issues for a full cycle". Right now, given that it's pretty much down to only limited edge-cases being an issue, it seems pretty likely that F25 will boot to Wayland by default (but will certainly still ship the X11 session as an alternative).

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    • #12
      Originally posted by rabcor View Post
      Animations being smoother is probably thanks to wayland, another nice thing about wayland is that it hugely decreases the odds of tearing. (Pretty much any graphics I use on X will tear X a new asshole unless I make some major tweaks to it, which often involves a compositor with vsync, and it never fully solves the problem)

      I noticed this too when I played around with wayland, it was smoother than any display server experience I have ever had (on any operating system) kinda excited to give KDE a second chance after it's ported to wayland. I don't have the technical knowledge to explain exactly how wayland reduces tearing and how it makes animations smoother (I think it was more that X and DRI always managed to fuck them up rather than wayland actually making them smoother, but it just has to do with how wayland outputs pixels on the screen differently than X) Wayland also has an easier time displaying more frames per second than X I would imagine, (more smooth frames certainly, X seems to kinda freak out whenever things are happening too fast).

      Anyhow, gnome wayland is the default on fedora now? thought it wouldn't be ready for like another half a year at least (probably full year!) what happened? Did they decide to use it in spite of a few missing features such as remote desktop and such? This is big news.
      Nice Lisp code..

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      • #13
        Originally posted by phoronix View Post

        Hitting the Wi-Fi hotkey once on my T450s enables airplane mode. Hitting the key again does not disable it, however. This is a regression compared to Fedora 23 and Gnome 3.18.

        http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=23296
        For the record, the bug is tracked here: https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=767696

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        • #14
          Why "slight" mode for hinting is the best choice?

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Klassic Six View Post
            Why "slight" mode for hinting is the best choice?
            **I am not a font or typography expert, so take this with a grain of salt**

            The way I've understood it is that the 'slight' hinting is the best compromise between the sharpness of the glyphs and the way they were designed, going with full or medium invoves going further and further away from the original design. Also, at least in the past, slight hinting would snap glyphs to the vertical grid, but leave the horizontal grid alone. That lets fonts look a little better without messing up the kerning of the original font.
            All opinions are my own not those of my employer if you know who they are.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Espionage724 View Post
              How's RPM Fusion with F24? Last I checked, there was some test 3rd-party repo that had some of RPM Fusion's packages rebuilt for GCC 6.
              RPMFusion supports F24 as of recently. You can also check out UnitiesRPMS which I personally find to be a better repo.

              RPMFusion and UnitedRPMS work together.

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              • #17
                How does Fedora Rawhide compare to Arch Linux, in terms of stability and up-to-dateness?

                Originally posted by Ericg View Post

                **I am not a font or typography expert, so take this with a grain of salt**

                The way I've understood it is that the 'slight' hinting is the best compromise between the sharpness of the glyphs and the way they were designed, going with full or medium invoves going further and further away from the original design. Also, at least in the past, slight hinting would snap glyphs to the vertical grid, but leave the horizontal grid alone. That lets fonts look a little better without messing up the kerning of the original font.
                Personally, I disable font hinting entirely, it's more "Mac-like" which I prefer.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Calinou View Post
                  How does Fedora Rawhide compare to Arch Linux, in terms of stability and up-to-dateness?
                  Stability? probably worse, though there are things in progress that try to remedy it.

                  Up-to-dateness? Even more than Arch, most likely. Rawhide packages the release candidate kernels, mesa, and in-development Gnome snapshots.
                  All opinions are my own not those of my employer if you know who they are.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Ericg View Post

                    **I am not a font or typography expert, so take this with a grain of salt**

                    The way I've understood it is that the 'slight' hinting is the best compromise between the sharpness of the glyphs and the way they were designed, going with full or medium invoves going further and further away from the original design. Also, at least in the past, slight hinting would snap glyphs to the vertical grid, but leave the horizontal grid alone. That lets fonts look a little better without messing up the kerning of the original font.
                    I think that's a pretty good explanation, afaiui.
                    In particular, slight hinting tell freetype to use either: the hinting provided with the font(if it exists, and if it uses the opentype/cff interpreter), or use the built-in freetype autohinter. Both of those end up snapping the font to the vertical grid only, and ends up looking a lot like Ubuntu's default.

                    Here's a good article about the process.
                    https://freetype.org/freetype2/docs/...g-general.html

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                    • #20
                      On the graphical upgrade being slow - yeah, that's unfortunate. We have a bug open tracking it here: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1336404

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