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  • MythTV 0.28 Released

    Phoronix: MythTV 0.28 Released

    It's been a while since the last major update to the MythTV HTPC software, but out today is version 0.28...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-0.28-Released

  • #2
    I really want a cheap ARM board for use as an OSS HTPC backend with a network TV tuner, but almost every cheap ARM board I can think of doesn't have the juice for MythTV, at least according to MythTV devs and community. RPi2&3 are completely out of the window due to no Gb Ethernet (among other things, but that's the true killer). I reckon the 1GB RAM being split between the CPU and GPU on the BananaPi-M2+ doesn't leave much wiggle room for the software. I also don't want the PowerVR graphics on the BPi-M3. The NVIDIA boards aren't exactly cheap (and, if memory serves me right, Nouveau support isn't exactly up to snuff on the boards to begin with), and even if the TK1 was, it only has a single USB3 port, which is complete buns but may be enough due to the SATA port.

    Speaking of, most of these boards don't even have USB3, which leaves a lot to be desired when wanting to quickly stream video higher than 1080p to multiple front-ends over the network...unless there's a separate NAS connected to the router via USB3/Gb Ethernet, with the storage medium itself being an SSD mounted via eSATA or USB3 or USB3.1 or what-have-you. That way, after the back-end works its trans-coding magic on movies or schedules the shows and records them (and trans-coding them if in MPEG2), all of the video is stored in a mutually-accessible area on the network from which the front-ends can access and dig through for one's viewing pleasure.

    The ORDROID-C2, Pine A64, and OrangePi Plus 2 are all interesting options, but, again, may not have enough juice for the job. All can absolutely work as fantastic front-ends, but they're all quite expensive to set up for just that purpose, especially considering the fact that it's a billion times easier to side-load Kodi onto an Amazon Fire Stick and away ye go (with only 1080p, but still quite cheap). My main concerns with the 3 boards are no USB3, small RAM size, and GPU power. The former wouldn't be a problem with the aforementioned solution, but the latter 2 bug me. I backed the Pine A64 (got the + model with 2GB RAM and Gb Ethernet), so I'll put it to the test when I get it.

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    • #3
      so why don't you just buy an x86 board? There are cheaper (if you don't want a rasbPI) and have more power. Also GBit and Sata, somethimes usb3. And x86 for better software support. Ok they consume 1 Watts more than avg. arm boards

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      • #4
        Originally posted by monraaf View Post
        so why don't you just buy an x86 board? There are cheaper (if you don't want a rasbPI) and have more power. Also GBit and Sata, somethimes usb3. And x86 for better software support. Ok they consume 1 Watts more than avg. arm boards
        An x86 board + PSU (which has a fan inside) are too big.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by monraaf View Post
          so why don't you just buy an x86 board?
          1) I simply want something different for a change, and having an ARM-based media server is more possible by the day. Did you honestly think I didn't know that the same could be accomplished with an x86 board?

          2) ARM SBCs are MUCH, MUCH smaller than the slimmest Mini-ITX x86 mobos and are even smaller than Intel NUCs (and don't explicitly require a fan). I really don't understand why people tolerate a big ass set-top box or computer being right next to their main TV. It's fine in the bedroom (game consoles an' that), but people's gateways and routers aren't located in the rooms where I live. Personally, unless you have a game room (or your living room IS the game room, which I personally don't like), I prefer to have a minimal shelf/table where the TV goes and the router and network servers away from it.

          3) If you think the up-front investment is the sole cost of ownership, then you're seriously missing the bigger picture. While electric bills aren't too big a deal around here (dat Louisiana oil money tho'), wouldn't it be cool to have less overhead for an appliance that's always running? I know that electric bills are more of a problem for, say, Europeans, so it'd be nice to save money here and there.

          4) I mentioned this in #1, but I'll touch upon it again. Most ARM SBCs don't need fans to be properly cooled, so operation is SILENT! In addition to less electricity overhead, less noisy appliances is nothing but a plus in my book. A big plus, in fact.

          5) Are x86 motherboards cheaper than the more fancy ARM SBCs? Sure...but you can't use a mobo by itself as a server. ARM SBCs have complete SoCs; just buy a power supply, case, and video cable. With the former, you need to buy, at minimum:
          -CPU (which, combined with mobo, already exceeds the total investment on an ARM SBC);
          -Case (more expensive than vast majority of ARM SBC cases);
          -PSU (more expensive than phone chargers or even dedicated ARM SBC power supplies); and
          -RAM (comes built into the SoC on an SBC).

          6) I keep hearing the whining about ARM-based media servers not having the same level of support as x86 servers do, but, for me, it has all the support it needs and then some. I don't need Windows. I don't need Plex. I don't even need HW-accelerated MPEG2. For all the ARM SBCs I consider candidates, any software I may choose to run in order to fulfill the purposes of a media server supports them. I don't need x86 for that.

          7) My concerns about no USB3 and SATA are with just those 3 boards. There are other ARM options that do indeed have USB3 and SATA, but I'm hesitant to choose them. I don't know enough about OSS Exynos5 support to choose the ODROID-XU4, and the Gizmo2 requires a fan (which kinda defeats the purpose). NAS sort of nullifies my concern with USB3 and SATA anyway.

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