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Vim Lands Asynchronous Processing Support

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  • Azpegath
    replied
    Originally posted by Archprogrammer View Post

    Alas, Vim might not build on and Amiga 500 anymore. I did however port Vim 7.2 to AmigaOS a couple of years ago and it was a joy to see how easy it was - I do hope NeoVim does not become less portable just to "clean up the code".
    No, I actually think that their goal was to become more portable, but to clean away support for old hardware (old #ifdefs) that hadn't even been working for years. They have however replaced a lot of the code with libraries instead, something that always involves a risk regarding portability.

    Some info and comments here!

    http://geoff.greer.fm/2015/01/15/why...tter-than-vim/

    Leave a comment:


  • Archprogrammer
    replied
    Originally posted by Azpegath View Post

    With that said, I think it's great if Vim decides to maintain support for building on the Apple 2 and an Amiga 500. But there's no reason for Neovim to do the same.
    Alas, Vim might not build on and Amiga 500 anymore. I did however port Vim 7.2 to AmigaOS a couple of years ago and it was a joy to see how easy it was - I do hope NeoVim does not become less portable just to "clean up the code".

    Leave a comment:


  • bug77
    replied
    Originally posted by codewiz View Post

    To me it actually looked like the two projects are diverging because the project leaders disagree on fundamental design issues:

    https://groups.google.com/d/msg/vim_...c/wXmJuL4PDQAJ
    https://groups.google.com/forum/#!ms...c/XZEXxaxDDQAJ

    I'd be really happy to see evidence of collaboration.
    Why collaboration? Maybe they'll merge to spite each other.

    Also, not exactly vim, but I can't not post this (again): https://twitter.com/iamdevloper/stat...923200?lang=en

    Leave a comment:


  • Azpegath
    replied
    Originally posted by Azpegath View Post

    I agree, Neovim will never move closer to Vim again. The differences are huge now and the code has been diverging from day 1. The purpose of Neovim is to create a modern version of Vim, feature-wise. The code could diverge infinitely, as long as the basic Vim functionality stays.
    I've been supporting Neovim with funding for over a year now and really hope they succeed in improving Vim in a direction which I would like it to go.

    Just throwing away support for ancient architectures and impossible build combinations deserves a medal. Changing build environment to CMake (even though CMake might not be the best thing in the world) is also such a huge step forward that you start to think "what the hell are Vim-developers thinking?".
    With that said, I think it's great if Vim decides to maintain support for building on the Apple 2 and an Amiga 500. But there's no reason for Neovim to do the same.

    Leave a comment:


  • Azpegath
    replied
    Originally posted by codewiz View Post

    To me it actually looked like the two projects are diverging because the project leaders disagree on fundamental design issues:

    https://groups.google.com/d/msg/vim_...c/wXmJuL4PDQAJ
    https://groups.google.com/forum/#!ms...c/XZEXxaxDDQAJ

    I'd be really happy to see evidence of collaboration.
    I agree, Neovim will never move closer to Vim again. The differences are huge now and the code has been diverging from day 1. The purpose of Neovim is to create a modern version of Vim, feature-wise. The code could diverge infinitely, as long as the basic Vim functionality stays.
    I've been supporting Neovim with funding for over a year now and really hope they succeed in improving Vim in a direction which I would like it to go.

    Just throwing away support for ancient architectures and impossible build combinations deserves a medal. Changing build environment to CMake (even though CMake might not be the best thing in the world) is also such a huge step forward that you start to think "what the hell are Vim-developers thinking?".

    Leave a comment:


  • Cyber Killer
    replied
    Speaking of editors, 'ne' is a pretty good one also. Quite powerfull with a ui reminding of the graphical editors.

    Leave a comment:


  • codewiz
    replied
    Originally posted by swoorup View Post
    Looks as if vim and neovim will merge later.
    To me it actually looked like the two projects are diverging because the project leaders disagree on fundamental design issues:

    https://groups.google.com/d/msg/vim_...c/wXmJuL4PDQAJ
    https://groups.google.com/forum/#!ms...c/XZEXxaxDDQAJ

    I'd be really happy to see evidence of collaboration.

    Leave a comment:


  • Damodread
    replied
    Originally posted by swoorup View Post
    Looks as if vim and neovim will merge later.

    From what I heard they won't. Neovim can't be summarized as a Vim fork with asynchronous processing support.
    They drastically modified the source code of Vim, with huge chunks of code which have been rewritten or cast away (the source code of Neovim is now ~30% smaller than that of the original Vim) and they are planning to do more.

    Leave a comment:


  • DeepDayze
    replied
    Originally posted by wargames View Post
    I still remember the editor that came with MSDOS, probably one of the best I've ever used.
    The one from MSDOS 5.0 and later is quite slick and dead simple like nano is, but the old DOS edlin is as old school as you can get

    Leave a comment:


  • swoorup
    replied
    Looks as if vim and neovim will merge later.

    Leave a comment:

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