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KDE 4.1 Released, KDE 4.2 In January

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  • curaga
    replied
    Some apps offer static builds for a quick run on any distro.
    Firefox and OO.o have their distro-agnostic packs.

    And there's nothing we can't compile

    Leave a comment:


  • Vadi
    replied
    No, the same doesn't go for other software. Because some software actually care about this Linux users and bother to package it.

    Leave a comment:


  • RealNC
    replied
    Originally posted by Vadi View Post
    Firefox 3 comes out, you do your updates, and you're fine. Or you install it from Add/Remove.

    You don't need to hunt down the website, select your language, download, and install
    Nope. You can't install unless it is put into your distro's repository. On Windows you get it immediately. On Linux you feel like a second-class citizen and you have to wait. Same goes for all other software.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vadi
    replied
    Firefox 3 comes out, you do your updates, and you're fine. Or you install it from Add/Remove.

    You don't need to hunt down the website, select your language, download, and install.

    It's all about the presentation. If you present umpteen options, obviously, they'll be confused. If you present one option, it'll be all good.

    Leave a comment:


  • _txf_
    replied
    Originally posted by deanjo View Post
    That is exactly what PackageKit addresses. Repositories are no different then having to hunt and download off the net for windows.
    what packagekit HOPES to address. It is a worthwhilde idea, whether in practice it works is another question as distro repos do have variation in version and package selection.

    Something good to complement packagekit would be something like klik but I haven't heard much from the project recently

    Leave a comment:


  • deanjo
    replied
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    That's my point exactly. "openSUSE does this, Ubuntu does that". When you go various websites software projects, you get things like "click here for Windows, click here for Debian, there for Ubuntu, click over there for openSUSE".

    We need a "click here for Linux". Download, install, run. Not repositories. I can hardly imagine this is ever gonna happen. Not that it's important for me, mind you. But "ready for the desktop" means "ready for the masses."

    That is exactly what PackageKit addresses. Repositories are no different then having to hunt and download off the net for windows.

    Leave a comment:


  • RealNC
    replied
    That's my point exactly. "openSUSE does this, Ubuntu does that". When you go various websites software projects, you get things like "click here for Windows, click here for Debian, there for Ubuntu, click over there for openSUSE".

    We need a "click here for Linux". Download, install, run. Not repositories. I can hardly imagine this is ever gonna happen. Not that it's important for me, mind you. But "ready for the desktop" means "ready for the masses."

    Leave a comment:


  • deanjo
    replied
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    It's not that simple. Simple is googling for the software, going to its page, downloading it and running its automagic installer (Windows) or drag&drop the icon (OS X). That's how it should work.
    http://www.packagekit.org/ <--- that is being addressed

    As well there are other distro's out there that utilize 1-click installs through other means.

    Firefox 3 comes out, you download it and install it. What's the deal with the repos and unstable? Firefox 3 final is stable, why does Linux think it's unstable?
    Stable in that term refers more to the official package selection for a particular version of distro release. It doesn't necessarily refer to the individual package. openSUSE 11 for example has FF3 marked as stable.
    Last edited by deanjo; 07-30-2008, 02:46 PM.

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  • RealNC
    replied
    Originally posted by Vadi View Post
    That's why you don't tell them about deb/rpm/portage/Gnome/KDE.

    Install whatever you like, and that's it. It's that simple.
    It's not that simple. Simple is googling for the software, going to its page, downloading it and running its automagic installer (Windows) or drag&drop the icon (OS X). That's how it should work. Firefox 3 comes out, you download it and install it. What's the deal with the repos and unstable? Firefox 3 final is stable, why does Linux think it's unstable?

    Note that the above questions aren't mine. If Linux gets to the point where there's a uniform standard for all of this, then it's ready for the desktop.

    Leave a comment:


  • Melcar
    replied
    Originally posted by killsudo View Post
    In kde4 > System Settings > Sounds do you have more then 1 sound output device? I have found on my Intel laptops I need to make my default output the #1 device for all sound output and that message goes away. I have both analog and digital options.

    It lists two. They both have the same description, just that one works and the other doesn't. Even if I set the one that works as default, Phonon would keep giving me that popup warning at startup.
    I still have to thinker with KDE4 a bit more, it's just that the lack of customization options in some areas depressed me, so I resorted to heavy drinking that night .
    Last edited by Melcar; 07-30-2008, 10:38 AM.

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