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LibreOffice 5.0 Open-Source Office Suite Has Been Branched

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  • LibreOffice 5.0 Open-Source Office Suite Has Been Branched

    Phoronix: LibreOffice 5.0 Open-Source Office Suite Has Been Branched

    LibreOffice 5.0 is the next version of this popular, cross-platform, open-source office suite and not LibreOffice 4.5 as was originally planned. LibreOffice 5.0 has now been branched in Git with the trunk development now focusing on LibreOffice 5.1...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...e-5.0-Branched

  • #2
    How is GTK 3 and Wayland support coming along?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
      How is GTK 3 and Wayland support coming along?
      The GTK3 plug for their VCL toolkit seems to be coming along well from the devs updates. I am not sure whether this is included in 5 or not but I am looking to build a git version soonish, Libreoffices codebase is something like a gig big which is why I haven't already. News on the wayland work is very scarce but, if I understand it right, relies on VCL itself being ported. The plugs just mimic the visual style in a similar fashion to how Java's Swing works. Currently because of the massive time and effort required, and the fact that XWayland is probably going to be a thing for at least 5 more years, they have put it in the 'todo at a later time' box.

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      • #4
        I build it every now and then since I'm using Gentoo (and haven't installed the libreoffice-bin package) and it's not too much fun I can tell you. Takes an hour or more on a i7 2.8 Ghz machine with 12 GB of RAM.

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        • #5
          lol got a typo - you said "Microsoft World". Anyway, sounds pretty good. Nice to see LO is catching up with MS Office, but they do still have a long way to go for anything that isn't Writer. Calc is good for the average person but is really lacking for business purposes.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Azpegath View Post
            I build it every now and then since I'm using Gentoo (and haven't installed the libreoffice-bin package) and it's not too much fun I can tell you. Takes an hour or more on a i7 2.8 Ghz machine with 12 GB of RAM.
            Well damn, if that's your speed I hate to think what mine would be. I only have an i5 and 8 gigs. It's times like these that make me wish that Libreoffice had a nightly, or even weekly, build server kinda like what Mozilla have. However, if that's the only way to test the GTK3 vclplug then I shall just have to dive in.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Azpegath View Post
              I build it every now and then since I'm using Gentoo (and haven't installed the libreoffice-bin package) and it's not too much fun I can tell you. Takes an hour or more on a i7 2.8 Ghz machine with 12 GB of RAM.
              Yeap. My AMD Brazos netbook? It takes 48 hours to compile it there. Yes, two days of non-stop compilation.

              What fun if there's a security update in the mean while!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Azpegath View Post
                I build it every now and then since I'm using Gentoo (and haven't installed the libreoffice-bin package) and it's not too much fun I can tell you. Takes an hour or more on a i7 2.8 Ghz machine with 12 GB of RAM.
                Originally posted by SpyroRyder
                Well damn, if that's your speed I hate to think what mine would be. I only have an i5 and 8 gigs. It's times like these that make me wish that Libreoffice had a nightly, or even weekly, build server kinda like what Mozilla have. However, if that's the only way to test the GTK3 vclplug then I shall just have to dive in.
                Don't complain.

                I built a development version of Libreoffice 3 months ago on a notebook featuring a low-voltage i5-4200U with 8GB of memory and it took about 4 -6 hours.
                When I built it on my desktop (Athlon 7750X2 + 4GB ram), it took >12 hours.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SpyroRyder View Post

                  Well damn, if that's your speed I hate to think what mine would be. I only have an i5 and 8 gigs. It's times like these that make me wish that Libreoffice had a nightly, or even weekly, build server kinda like what Mozilla have. However, if that's the only way to test the GTK3 vclplug then I shall just have to dive in.
                  We have daily builds: http://dev-builds.libreoffice.org/daily/ and with tips from https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/...parallel/Linux you can make a independent/parallel "install" of LibreOffice which doesn't interfere with the currently installed one.

                  ...but I don't know if any of the daily build include the gtk3 vclplug.


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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Azpegath View Post
                    I build it every now and then since I'm using Gentoo (and haven't installed the libreoffice-bin package) and it's not too much fun I can tell you. Takes an hour or more on a i7 2.8 Ghz machine with 12 GB of RAM.
                    Yes, Libreoffice is quite a beast. But I am happy the times are over where we would compile it (OOo at the time) for hours on an old Duron and then at 95% compilation it would fail somehow...

                    current release of libreoffice + libreoffice-l10n
                    all other dependencies done
                    ccache on

                    AMD Athlon(tm) II X4 645 Processor (4 x 3.1 GHz)
                    ondemand scheduler
                    6 GB RAM DDR2-800
                    SATA 2 HDD
                    Asus M4A78-E
                    ca. 151 min (2.5 h)

                    ---------

                    AMD Athlon(tm) 5350 APU with Radeon(tm) R3 (4 x 2.05 GHz)
                    ondemand scheduler
                    8 GB RAM DDR3-1066
                    Biostar AM1MHP
                    SATA 3 SSD
                    ca. 335 min (about 5.5 h)

                    (I love that Kabini machine. Low power, silent, cute, the tech itself was cheaper than housing, or keyboard or monitor... even the mouse (Roccat) was more expensive that the SOC, but performance is still fairly nice. Definitely an improvement over the E-350.)


                    If I ever have the time I'll try it on my E-350 notebook and my Geode LX 800 (lol, I'll have to mount external memory as temp. space and even external swap to compile) or my VIA C7.
                    I think I once tried it on my former VIA C3-2 notebook... maybe this is one of the things that brought it down after ~ 10 years.

                    More on topic:
                    I'm looking forward to it. It seems they are using a lot of capacities on MSO compatibility. Which I am grateful for since I sadly have to deal with that crap documents (esp. DOCX with its 4+ secret (?) versions is a pain) from time to time. On the other hand it is sad that we still have to face these troubles. I hated DOCX since it came out. Typical MS "me too" and then this ISO voting... it was a farce and obvious as hell and it put the ISO into major discredit. And the best thing is that MS does not keep to its own published 6000 pages (?) of "standard".
                    Last edited by Adarion; 05-21-2015, 03:46 AM.
                    Stop TCPA, stupid software patents and corrupt politicians!

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