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DNF Package Manager: "Getting More & More Stable"

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  • ihatemichael
    replied
    Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    if it's taking 10 hours, assuming you're not just lying, then that means that your internet connection is slow, as you're downloading what? 2GB worth of files to switch between 21 and 22? The Fedup part doesn't take any longer than a normal installation which is ~ 30 minutes or so.
    I didn't use fedup to upgrade.

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  • ihatemichael
    replied
    Originally posted by Anvil View Post
    Arch v's Fedora Troll eh? are you following in the footsteps of WorldOfGnome?
    I'm not trolling.

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  • Luke_Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by ihatemichael View Post
    What do you mean slow? Installing Arch Linux with GNOME 3.16 and everything takes me 20 minutes or 30 minutes max, this can't be.
    if it's taking 10 hours, assuming you're not just lying, then that means that your internet connection is slow, as you're downloading what? 2GB worth of files to switch between 21 and 22? The Fedup part doesn't take any longer than a normal installation which is ~ 30 minutes or so.

    Leave a comment:


  • Anvil
    replied
    Originally posted by ihatemichael View Post
    What do you mean slow? Installing Arch Linux with GNOME 3.16 and everything takes me 20 minutes or 30 minutes max, this can't be.
    Arch v's Fedora Troll eh? are you following in the footsteps of WorldOfGnome?

    Leave a comment:


  • Candy
    replied
    Originally posted by Anvil View Post
    i would say its getting " More User Friendly" dunno about stable.
    Yes and here is the problem ... "More User Friendly" ... I assume they have put main focus on use cases done by the normal user. E.g. normal installation, de-installation and unpgrading of packages. End.

    But how about ... "More Company Friendly" ?

    I've been in touch with the developers on bugzilla for the past couple of days. While I have filled in two bugreports, one of them might have found a simple solution. The other is still left in air.

    What about companies, organizations, team of developers, administrators or others who've been using "yum" to do more, than "dnf" is doing at the current moment ?

    The thing is - While I do welcome "dnf" as a successor to yum, dnf still lacks possibilites that we rely on "today". What about companies (or above mentioned groups of people), who follow a strikt migration plan switching e.g. from Fedora Relase A towards Fedora Release B. Which also includes switching their entire infrastructure towards that new release ?

    Now these companies (at least those with infrastructure tied around yum) need also to deal with a deprecated "yum". This all wouln't be such a big problem if yum wouldn't have been marked as "deprecated" and or spit out all these "deprecation" messages (left as is) and then slowly migrating to "dnf" once it fills in missing use cases that others rely on ?

    The question left is: Will "dnf" deliver just on time ?. How will it look like, if you as company go to your customers - still required to use "yum" which infront of the customer (while demonstrating your infrastructure) spits out "yum is deprecated" messages ?

    This use case is still open. While we can achieve and solve it with yum, we can not do it by using dnf. I also offered an alternative approach that might be a better solution for the long go:

    https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1209638#c3

    The below use case might have been solved (which we need to test soon and report back):

    https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1209648#c2

    We are currently in a *bad* situation to say the truth. A situation where we - besides the migration plan from switching from Fedora 20 to Fedora 22 - also need to find an alternative approach for having our infrastructure operating as before. Probably for the download and downloaddir stuff we might still be using "yum-deprecated".

    If you are interested you might like to read the use case of the first bug reported here. To see, that there is more than "User Friendly" installation, de-installation and upgrade processes.

    Leave a comment:


  • ihatemichael
    replied
    Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    I think your internet connection is just slow. Fedup took maybe an hour max for me, and frankly it's never been slow in my experience compared to what I expect out of a package manager, however DNF should be faster in terms of it's dependency resolution because of using libsolv.

    On an unrelated note, one thing I'd like to see is for the dependency trees to be used to allow downloading and installation to happen in parallel and for installations of unrelated software to occur in parallel, possibly for example installing all the independent depends of a package simultaneously.
    What do you mean slow? Installing Arch Linux with GNOME 3.16 and everything takes me 20 minutes or 30 minutes max, this can't be.

    Leave a comment:


  • Anvil
    replied
    Originally posted by ihatemichael View Post
    But is it fast? Yum is dog slow.

    Last time I tried, upgrading Fedora from Fedora 21 to 22 took me 10 hours. I'm not kidding.

    10 fucking hours, this is unacceptable.
    please dont use the word " fucking" i get Horny. browsing porn takes up a lot of bandwidth yanno

    Leave a comment:


  • Luke_Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by ihatemichael View Post
    But is it fast? Yum is dog slow.

    Last time I tried, upgrading Fedora from Fedora 21 to 22 took me 10 hours. I'm not kidding.

    10 fucking hours, this is unacceptable.
    I think your internet connection is just slow. Fedup took maybe an hour max for me, and frankly it's never been slow in my experience compared to what I expect out of a package manager, however DNF should be faster in terms of it's dependency resolution because of using libsolv.

    On an unrelated note, one thing I'd like to see is for the dependency trees to be used to allow downloading and installation to happen in parallel and for installations of unrelated software to occur in parallel, possibly for example installing all the independent depends of a package simultaneously.

    Leave a comment:


  • ihatemichael
    replied
    But is it fast? Yum is dog slow.

    Last time I tried, upgrading Fedora from Fedora 21 to 22 took me 10 hours. I'm not kidding.

    10 fucking hours, this is unacceptable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Anvil
    replied
    i would say its getting " More User Friendly" dunno about stable.

    Leave a comment:

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