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GXUI: A New Cross-Platform UI Library By Google

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  • GXUI: A New Cross-Platform UI Library By Google

    Phoronix: GXUI: A New Cross-Platform UI Library By Google

    GXUI is a new cross-platform user interface library developed at Google for their Go programming language...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...XUI-UI-Library

  • #2
    Please tell me this is gonna compete with Qt and GTK (and WPF)... I hate Qt and GTK, I hate them so fucking much! (GTK is ugly and outdated, Qt is pretty, but slow and a hardcore pain in the ass to learn and code in)
    Last edited by rabcor; 18 March 2015, 07:38 PM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by rabcor View Post
      Please tell me this is gonna compete with Qt and GTK (and WPF)... I hate Qt and GTK, I hate them so fucking much! (GTK is ugly and outdated, Qt is pretty, but slow and a hardcore pain in the ass to learn and code in)
      GTK 3 is new, no? Qt is also different nowadays. You use QtScript and their own GUI creator tool. No need for C++.

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      • #4
        Qt

        Originally posted by rabcor View Post
        Please tell me this is gonna compete with Qt and GTK (and WPF)... I hate Qt and GTK, I hate them so fucking much! (GTK is ugly and outdated, Qt is pretty, but slow and a hardcore pain in the ass to learn and code in)
        I don't know much about Gtk, but as far as Qt goes your the first person I ever heard refer to it as slow. Please elaborate. For the most part it gets compiled from C++ so don't know what you are comparing it to. As for learning I think you need to give it a few months of working with it (the same goes for any ToolKit). For starters the documentation and community for Qt are second to none.

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        • #5
          I am looking for a starter language for kids to learn some programming like the old 'logo' language.

          If this is easy to learn, and contains enough gadgets to develop GUI apps quickly on Linux, Android, and Windows, it could fly and eat into Microsoft Visual Studio world.

          Watch out, Redmond.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by DarkCloud View Post
            I don't know much about Gtk, but as far as Qt goes your the first person I ever heard refer to it as slow. Please elaborate. For the most part it gets compiled from C++ so don't know what you are comparing it to. As for learning I think you need to give it a few months of working with it (the same goes for any ToolKit). For starters the documentation and community for Qt are second to none.
            Back when I was writing WPF in visual studio, the approach I took was to write WPF code (basically a script, Qt works similar, but I don't remember exactly what the UI script is called, either way in the QtCreator you can't manually edit it, it must be edited through the designer thing (a bit of a pain...)) and then just write C# code which I would refer to for the WPF's UI functions. I don't remember exactly how it went down but it was a simple arrengement, C# for any backend functionality, wpf for the front end, they interacted with each other pretty seamlessly. On the other hand in Qt I cannot do this. Qt wants me to use Qt libraries for all the commands to the point where they might as well just have made a new programming language from scratch instead of using c++. In Qt it's not "str", it's "QString" otherwise I will run into problems when trying to forward whatever my function or class wanted to spit out to the UI, I need to use Qt's specific objects for anything to bloody work, and I just hate that approach. I imagine GTK is the same way, but whether it is or not, GTK is ugly, and it's old. GTK3 I guess is just ugly (and besides, Qt supports so many more platforms than GTK) but really my gut has just always preferred Qt over GTK for some strange reason; I feel like there's something really major lacking in both of them but of course can't pinpoint what. Either way the reason Qt is a pain in the ass to learn is that you can't just jump in and use Qt for managing the GUI and C++ for managing whatever goes on under the hood, no you need to learn the Qt libraries like the back of your hand so that you know what to use instead of str or int or float (like QString and QFloat and QJunk), and I also think this is majorly to blame for any performance issues I've been having with Qt programs as an end user, although that's just a blind guess, it just seems like it to me.

            As for slowness, Qt programs are slow to launch it's well known, but I can't come up with anything very specific. Gpicview is a billion times faster than gwenview, any file manager seems to be faster than Dolphin, any non-Qt music library player seems to be faster and smoother than amarok, etc. It might just be incompetent developers, but I like to blame it on Qt rather than the devs. We'll see if LXQT can affect my views on this, but for the end user, Qt seems a couple of milliseconds (or seconds) slower than GTK as far as I've seen even if I can't really back it up, it's just how it feels. (Sluggish is how). But the truth is, both of them feel slow and ugly compared to WPF, at least as I've seen WPF on Windows 7. And I hate that, because WPF is not cross platform.

            Either way I am not completely into this whole thing and I know that I don't fully know what I'm talking about. I'm just following what my gut tells me.
            Last edited by rabcor; 18 March 2015, 08:45 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by goTouch View Post
              I am looking for a starter language for kids to learn some programming like the old 'logo' language.

              If this is easy to learn, and contains enough gadgets to develop GUI apps quickly on Linux, Android, and Windows, it could fly and eat into Microsoft Visual Studio world.

              Watch out, Redmond.
              As if. C# has a more solid position than ever before, and is poised to consume what were previously Java strongholds. The reality is that until Go, Rust, D, whatever has some major application written in it, then it's doomed to forever sit in the shadows. It doesn't matter how wonderful you think the language is, how innovative it might be, or if everyone switching to it would make the world a better, faster, more concurrent place. Unless someone is actually using it for important things it might as well not exist.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by rabcor View Post
                As for slowness, Qt programs are slow to launch it's well known, but I can't come up with anything very specific. Gpicview is a billion times faster than gwenview, any file manager seems to be faster than Dolphin, any non-Qt music library player seems to be faster and smoother than amarok, etc. It might just be incompetent developers, but I like to blame it on Qt rather than the devs. We'll see if LXQT can affect my views on this, but for the end user, Qt seems a couple of milliseconds (or seconds) slower than GTK as far as I've seen even if I can't really back it up, it's just how it feels. (Sluggish is how). But the truth is, both of them feel slow and ugly compared to WPF, at least as I've seen WPF on Windows 7. And I hate that, because WPF is not cross platform.

                Either way I am not completely into this whole thing and I know that I don't fully know what I'm talking about. I'm just following what my gut tells me.
                If you're running LXDE (or really anything not-KDE) as indicated by your talking about LXQT that would mean that of course GTK applications will load faster because the GTK toolkit is preloaded in memory whereas Dolphin or any Qt application has to load the Qt toolkit and perhaps KDELib into memory before it's able to run the program, resulting in a slight startup lag while it does so.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
                  As if. C# has a more solid position than ever before, and is poised to consume what were previously Java strongholds. The reality is that until Go, Rust, D, whatever has some major application written in it, then it's doomed to forever sit in the shadows. It doesn't matter how wonderful you think the language is, how innovative it might be, or if everyone switching to it would make the world a better, faster, more concurrent place. Unless someone is actually using it for important things it might as well not exist.
                  I still think Google may eventually allow Go apps on Android, but obviously it isn't anywhere in the same conversation as C# yet.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
                    I still think Google may eventually allow Go apps on Android, but obviously it isn't anywhere in the same conversation as C# yet.
                    Perhaps, but it doesn't really matter unless people actually want to write important applications in it. GXUI is a big step in the right direction if they ever want Go to become a thing, but either a DE, or Chrome, or something needs to be written or rewritten into Go otherwise it's not going to take off.

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