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LXQt 0.9 Released, Now Requires Qt5 & KDE Frameworks 5

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  • grok
    replied
    Operations will also be much more secure once a new OS is spawned to establish a TCP connection or to answer a HTTP request, and then shutdown/deleted once the task has been serviced.

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  • grok
    replied
    Originally posted by bitman View Post
    From Lennart's blog post i got an impression he wants chroot on steroids. I see no elegance if we will have to have 10x of every basic lib for 10 distros we want to run software from.
    BUT you can statically link everything and then use 10x instances of everything in containers and VMs, and then deduplicate it all back (or use the copy-on-write differential snapshots). Isn't that marvelous?

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  • GreatEmerald
    replied
    Originally posted by bitman View Post
    From Lennart's blog post i got an impression he wants chroot on steroids. I see no elegance if we will have to have 10x of every basic lib for 10 distros we want to run software from.
    That would happen without standardisation. With it, you could have library sets not duplicated. Say, all Debian derivatives could use the same library sets. Or at least all Ubuntu derivatives (they have the same release cycle, after all).

    But yes, in general I agree that it's not quite as elegant as never having to keep several library sets, but then again that would just add the option to do so, not make it a requirement.

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  • bitman
    replied
    Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
    That's about what the systemd devs are pushing for.
    From Lennart's blog post i got an impression he wants chroot on steroids. I see no elegance if we will have to have 10x of every basic lib for 10 distros we want to run software from.

    Leave a comment:


  • drSeehas
    replied
    Originally posted by pininety View Post
    ... Have it in the hands of a Benevolent dictator for life? Like BSD? ...
    Dictator for life???
    You can choose at least between FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD and DragonflyBSD.

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  • grok
    replied
    Originally posted by bitman View Post
    <rant>
    People do not know what they want? Ofc they do! They want their apps XYZ to work so they can do their thing. Also they want same software run next time they upgrade system. Without having them to redownload/reinstall/recompile stuff. Developer part of the world want to easily target platform with reasonable backwards compatibility. Meaning build software once and have it run on all reasonably new distros in case of linux. Say distros released within last 5 years.
    I want to chat on MSN (using of course any client other than the microsoft one) but microsoft pulled the plug on it all. Crap.
    And of course every other people is in the failbook cabbal. So, I use my computer to communicate with people I don't know rather than people I know as I could do too a decade ago.
    That built-in IM program that launched on start up with Windows was brilliant. It would be cool that such an IM program would be pushed on users, but with modern security on it (hell, I should be able to give a throw-away long random number to connect with some random dude or babe). And remember, a computer comes with a keyboard not a webcam or mic.

    Sorry if I'm going off-topic but you have it right, users want to do things (very often it's "I want to watch a movie", or for old people "I want to read and send e-mail"). Sometimes the ability to use a particular app is needed, sometimes not (e.g. if the chess game changes but it's a chess game with a non-crappy UI, that will do)

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  • pininety
    replied
    Originally posted by jmcharron View Post
    So much hate. Lack of standardization is a God send
    I am not so sure about this. You need some standardized interfaces or you will be just looked in into what you distro ships.
    Imagine if we had no standardized filesystem. Want to run KDE? Well, only runs with ext4, wanna try gnome? Well, you have reformat your harddrive because they only support brtfs.

    In my eyes, the other solution, having no distos at all and just have every software work everywhere (which basically makes distros only be a defined set of pre-installed packages + some art work) is much more preferable. But then you have the problem who is doing this big repo?
    Have it in the hands of a Benevolent dictator for life? Like BSD? Have it in the hand of Red Hat? Have fight between the distros? You also get a single point of failure/attack. Or do we have a distributed system where every software company only has their stuff and you grep it from all over the internet to build your system? But how do you organize trust then?

    But well, my guess is the future lays in the middle somewhere. Distros will become more similar due to standardisation but never go away completely.

    Leave a comment:


  • GreatEmerald
    replied
    Originally posted by rainbyte View Post
    Using package managers is not the problem. Having a single place where users could obtain apps is good.
    The real problem is all the effort wasted on packaging software again and again for each distro.
    Not to mention all the distro specific bugs introduced every now and then.

    The ideal would be to have a single repository, which could be shared between distros.
    It should have some way to detect if software is compatible with user's current distro.
    Something like google play, which manage compatibility using android api versions.

    Users should not be forced to change distro, wait next distro version or search for alternative software,
    when the version they want is not there because it was not packaged yet for that single distro.
    Users should be able to choose which software and version to download (deps should be auto-detected).
    That's about what the systemd devs are pushing for.

    Leave a comment:


  • bison
    replied
    Originally posted by jmcharron View Post
    So much hate.
    So much hyperbole. Disagreeing with someone -- even strongly -- is not hate.

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  • jmcharron
    replied
    Originally posted by bitman View Post
    This is exactly why linux is failing on desktop. If you find tinkering all day in config files fun then good for you *thumbs-up*. Bigger part of remaining world actually wants to just get on with their stuff. You know do their thing and be productive in it. And be able to run software without a hassle. So please dont present lack of standartisation as something good because its not.
    So much hate. Lack of standardization is a God send. If I don't feel the need to use a desktop, guess what!? I don't have to install it. Don't like systemd, you have alternatives. I've been a big fan of YAST so I've been using OpenSuSE for the past decade(zypper is sweet also), some people like Debian(apt-get) and others Gentoo(Portage), others roll their own... Variety is the spice of life. Linux has always been a beautifully flawed multiheaded beast for power users and don't expect it to change very much. If you like cookie cutter use OS X.

    To take a quote from Cave Johnson... They say great science is built on the shoulders of giants. Not here. At Aperture, we do all our science from scratch, no hand holding.


    On a side note.... I can't think of the last time I had to hand edit a config file to get my OS to work. I guess I can thank YAST for that.

    Leave a comment:

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