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Mozilla's Servo Still On Track For 2015 Alpha Release

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  • Mozilla's Servo Still On Track For 2015 Alpha Release

    Phoronix: Servo Is Boding Very Well For The Future Of Mozilla

    Mozilla's Servo Engine that's written in the Rust programming language and designed to be a highly parallel layout engine continues to be advancing very well and could see an alpha release this year...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Engine-LCA2015

  • #2
    Cool they made an very own programming language and implemented Servo in it.

    It will be interesting to see what happens to Rust, and what will be of Rust in a few years.

    Rust seems interesting, but could have a better syntax.
    It seems much nicer than C, but not as beautiful as C#.

    Would be interesting if a OS kernel was written in Rust.
    Imagine if Linux were ported to Rust.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
      Would be interesting if a OS kernel was written in Rust.
      Imagine if Linux were ported to Rust.
      There is a (toy) kernel written in rust and somebody even used it for micro controllers.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
        Rust seems interesting, but could have a better syntax.
        It seems much nicer than C, but not as beautiful as C#.
        It's a relatively low-level language for doing systems programming... a modern replacement for C or C++, designed to avoid a lot of the simple errors (buffer overflows, etc) that are easy to get wrong in those languages.

        But it's not intended to compete with languages like C#... doesn't include garbage collection, doesn't do full OO, doesn't provide comprehensive APIs for everything the user could ever want to do (although the standard library is pretty good, heavily inspired by higher-level languages instead of the likes of POSIX)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Delgarde View Post
          It's a relatively low-level language for doing systems programming... a modern replacement for C or C++, designed to avoid a lot of the simple errors (buffer overflows, etc) that are easy to get wrong in those languages.

          But it's not intended to compete with languages like C#... doesn't include garbage collection, doesn't do full OO, doesn't provide comprehensive APIs for everything the user could ever want to do (although the standard library is pretty good, heavily inspired by higher-level languages instead of the likes of POSIX)
          I agree.

          Rust - C/C++ replacement for most "native" and security focused apps, as well as being ideal for writing browsers, kernels, games, and so on.

          Go - Java/C# replacement with much nicer syntax, less maintenance, more suited for web-server development and also mobile development than Java as well (if Google ever plans to replace it as its core language. Technically it *could* do it once every has switched to ART, it's just a lot of work).

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          • #6
            Readability os one thing that weirds me out on rust too. As if designers said "Code readability? We dont need no stinkin readablity! \o/ We are geeks and like it dirty!". Seriously this front was explored a lot already by lots of other languages but they decided to just ignore it. I suspect it will be biting them in the ass in the long run. Maybe bites wont be as big to notice immediately but programmers can cope with nicely looking code much better/faster.

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            • #7
              Rust feels like code Yoga. It looks cool and healthy, but when it gets serious and you must quickly deliver a successful result it isn't too fun to do.

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              • #8
                I don't like or dislike Rust's syntax so I'm curious what folks in this thread dislike about it. Are there some specific parts that would be better changed? It clearly has a strong ml feel to it but I'd (maybe unjustly) assumed imperative programmers would be partial to its C-esque bracyness.

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                • #9
                  The amount of semantics per line can get a bit heavy:

                  Code:
                  pub fn new(mut stream: &'a mut (Reader + 'a), addr: SocketAddr) -> HttpResult<Request<'a>> {
                  It makes me want to write it in multiple lines:

                  Code:
                  pub fn new(
                      mut stream: &'a mut (Reader + 'a),
                      addr: SocketAddr
                  ) -> HttpResult<Request<'a>>
                  {

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                  • #10
                    Hmm I don't see Go as a C# replacement. People don't use C# because they associate it with mono (.NET being Okay on Windows).
                    Compiled code in C# is pretty awesome. C# is pretty awesome. But it has a bad reputation. Heck just being from Microsoft makes 50% of the programmers reluctant to use it.
                    Go and Rust are pretty awesome too - but in C#'s favor its been around for a very long time already.

                    As for Rust, it doesn't support garbage collection by design - its better than that. It's made not to require garbage collection neither manual allocation. As fast as C but safer, basically.

                    If anything, none of these replace anything. Go can replace C. So can Python. So can Rust. <insert language here> And vice-versa!

                    It turns out, however, that most Go programmers are Python programmers. Most rust programmers are C++ programmers (albeit the ecosystem is much smaller).

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