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GNOME MultiWriter: Easy Duplication Of Many USB Devices

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  • Chewi
    replied
    I knew about USR1 but Pipe Viewer is very nice.

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  • M@yeulC
    replied
    Originally posted by caligula View Post
    If you're ever flashed Linux images, dd is the utility. The only thing it's lacking is a progress indicator.
    Just
    Code:
    killall -USR1 dd
    or whatever way to send this signal to the dd process will make it display its progression. I guess one could easily make a script that parses its output to display a "Progress bar".

    Leave a comment:


  • Chewi
    replied
    I've been thinking about this some more and I can't think where an EOF would actually be used in this context. The OS knows how big the underlying disk is. If I ask a utility to copy from a block device, I want it to do exactly that and copy end-to-end without caring about the contents. At the partition level, partition tables know the start point and size of each partition. At the LVM level, it has detailed information about where each segment lies. At the filesystem level, every filesystem knows its own size. The OS complains if you somehow read past the end of a partition, LVM volume, or the disk itself. None of this requires an EOF.

    On a somewhat related note, I once tried writing a tarball on the fly straight to a CDR without the overhead of ISO9660. I was delighted to find that it worked as long as I padded the end with enough zeros. I suppose it was little different to writing to a tape.
    Last edited by Chewi; 03 January 2015, 07:22 AM.

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  • Chewi
    replied
    Originally posted by RahulSundaram
    A simple cp doesn't do what this program does. When we are in trade-shows and we have to write dozens of USB disks, running cp isn't efficient since it is not multi-threaded.
    I was being a little facetious. I realised afterwards that tee would probably work but admittedly not quite as straightforward.

    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
    To the best of my knowledge cp does not copy over the much needed EOFs and EOLs needed for binary images to function correctly.
    I see that this is mentioned on Wikipedia but I've used cp for years with no ill effects. I frankly find this surprising. Perhaps they meant cat? The problem with dd is that it doesn't work out the optimal block size for you so it can be much slower.

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  • caligula
    replied
    Originally posted by You- View Post
    You are assuming a single purpose for the prepared USB sticks

    I can imagine some potential layperson preparing materials for a course. This could be a nice convenience tool.
    Ok I can see it now. For something like conference usb keys when the parallel performance isn't that important but you can set up a 20 port hub to do the job.

    Leave a comment:


  • drspinderwalf
    replied
    A really handy tool! A few years ago I was looking for a simple utitility to use without having to delve too much into black magick. This will be very helpful for a few people I know of that need to prepare thumb drives on a mass scale once a year.

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  • You-
    replied
    Originally posted by caligula View Post
    I'm probably also missing something but if someone is so clueless that doesn't know how to do this with bash / gnu parallel & dd, maybe he shouldn't be doing it in the first place? Why would such a noob flash multiple usb sticks? If you want to install Linux on multiple machines, use PXE boot, seriously.
    You are assuming a single purpose for the prepared USB sticks

    I can imagine some potential layperson preparing materials for a course. This could be a nice convenience tool.

    Leave a comment:


  • caligula
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
    To the best of my knowledge cp does not copy over the much needed EOFs and EOLs needed for binary images to function correctly.
    If you're ever flashed Linux images, dd is the utility. The only thing it's lacking is a progress indicator.

    Leave a comment:


  • caligula
    replied
    I'm probably also missing something but if someone is so clueless that doesn't know how to do this with bash / gnu parallel & dd, maybe he shouldn't be doing it in the first place? Why would such a noob flash multiple usb sticks? If you want to install Linux on multiple machines, use PXE boot, seriously.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by Chewi View Post
    Code:
    cp /dev/sdc /dev/sdd
    Job's a good'un.
    To the best of my knowledge cp does not copy over the much needed EOFs and EOLs needed for binary images to function correctly.

    Leave a comment:

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