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Opera 24 On Chromium Now Available For Linux

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  • phoronix
    started a topic Opera 24 On Chromium Now Available For Linux

    Opera 24 On Chromium Now Available For Linux

    Phoronix: Opera 24 On Chromium Now Available For Linux

    In early 2013 it was announced Opera would be switching to Google's Chromium Engine over its own internal web rendering engine it had been using up to that point. They switched to Google's forked WebKit engine and for about a year now have been doing new Windows releases while Linux was left out...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTcyNzc

  • grayhat
    replied
    A benchmark of the new Opera vs Firefox vs Chrome and/or others would be interesting

    Leave a comment:


  • kernelOfTruth
    replied
    Originally posted by Ansla View Post
    It's not Adobe that maintains/releases the PPAPI version, it's Google. And you can already get them (for use with Chromium) from dl.google.com, though that site is not browsable so to actually see the files you have to use a mirror.
    Awesome !

    that should make bumping ebuilds locally for Google Chrome much easier once I know which versions really exist

    Thanks a lot



    I'm also wishing that they would update their branch of the 12 Version but this likely will never happen

    will see how the development of Opera goes

    once bookmark handling has significantly improved - I might switch over from Chromium (of which the Bookmark management isn't very advanced/user-friendly)

    Leave a comment:


  • strcat
    replied
    Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
    The engine (Blink) is open-source, but the actual browser is not. The stash, speed dial, mouse gestures, pretty much the whole GUI is closed-source.

    This is the same as Chrome, which contains closed-source code. (Chromium is what you get when you strip away all the closed-source parts of Chrome.)
    Chrome doesn't offer additional features over Chromium beyond a more colourful logo. It ships with the Flash and PDF plugins, but these can also be used with Chromium. The PDF plugin is now open-source, so perhaps it will begin shipping with Chromium.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ansla
    replied
    Originally posted by nachoig View Post
    The problem is not the support for PPAPI, but if Adobe will release a redistributable package with Flash PPAPI like they do with Flash NPAPI.
    It's not Adobe that maintains/releases the PPAPI version, it's Google. And you can already get them (for use with Chromium) from dl.google.com, though that site is not browsable so to actually see the files you have to use a mirror.

    Originally posted by nachoig View Post
    +1. Even Chromium has more features than Opera Chromium-based. I used Opera for 8 years, but I switched to Chromium (also tried Firefox, SeaMonkey, rekonq, QupZilla) after Opera 12.
    I only use Opera 12 for some stupid sites that don't render correctly in Konqueror even with the Webkit engine. For that usage it was better than the major browsers as it was lighter. I hope that will not change with the doubling of the version.
    Last edited by Ansla; 06-24-2014, 10:03 AM. Reason: Typo

    Leave a comment:


  • flywheel
    replied
    Too little, too late

    For quite some time I was a devoted Opera user, but migrated to Firefox last year. This is too little, too late. If I wanted to use Chromium technology, I would go straight to the source and use Chromium itself.

    Leave a comment:


  • BlackStar
    replied
    Originally posted by Nuc!eoN View Post
    So the Choromium based Opera is not open source?? I actually thought it is is, and also the German wikipedia says so:


    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opera

    Dunno if thats correct though....
    The engine (Blink) is open-source, but the actual browser is not. The stash, speed dial, mouse gestures, pretty much the whole GUI is closed-source.

    This is the same as Chrome, which contains closed-source code. (Chromium is what you get when you strip away all the closed-source parts of Chrome.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Daktyl198
    replied
    Originally posted by Marc Driftmeyer View Post
    How is this a surprise?
    Well, Opera 12.x and previous were famous for the sheer amount of features they managed to have while still keeping the browser light and efficient. Take that away, and it just becomes a sub-par Chromium chrome that fits in nicely with the hordes of other browsers that fit that description.

    It's kind of sad, really...
    which is why I'm rooting for Otter Browser so much :P

    Leave a comment:


  • Marc Driftmeyer
    replied
    Originally posted by nachoig View Post
    The problem is not the support for PPAPI, but if Adobe will release a redistributable package with Flash PPAPI like they do with Flash NPAPI.



    +1. Even Chromium has more features than Opera Chromium-based. I used Opera for 8 years, but I switched to Chromium (also tried Firefox, SeaMonkey, rekonq, QupZilla) after Opera 12.
    How is this a surprise?

    Leave a comment:


  • Nuc!eoN
    replied
    Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
    One year without support is simply too long, and closed-source browsers are no longer relevant. Bye bye, Opera.
    So the Choromium based Opera is not open source?? I actually thought it is is, and also the German wikipedia says so:

    Originally posted by Wikipedia DE
    Lizenz bis 12.17 Propriet?r (Freeware),
    ab 16 Open Source
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opera

    Dunno if thats correct though....

    Leave a comment:

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