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Features To Look Forward To In GNOME 3.12

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  • phoronix
    started a topic Features To Look Forward To In GNOME 3.12

    Features To Look Forward To In GNOME 3.12

    Phoronix: Features To Look Forward To In GNOME 3.12

    GNOME 3.12 is gearing up to be released tomorrow, so here's a recap of features to look forward to with this next major GNOME desktop update...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY0Mjg

  • Vim_User
    replied
    @TheBlackCat: Just put that moron on your ignore list, we all know that he is intentionally lying and that no rational discussion is possible with that troll. Why feeding him, just ignore him.

    Leave a comment:


  • hooluupog
    replied
    I love gnome 3.12. It looks simple,intuitive and consistent. I hate complex ui design(excessive buttons and menu options,full of rarely used,half-finished features,etc.) and too much customization for users.The only thing that perplexes me is GTK+. GTK+ is buggy and its development is too slow compare with QT.
    Last edited by hooluupog; 03-27-2014, 05:39 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheBlackCat
    replied
    Originally posted by Honton View Post
    Gnome didn't remove anything like this. So Gnome wins.
    First, again, no user-facing features were removed with baloo. Second, in case you forgot what you wrote, it was:

    Originally posted by Honton
    Q: How many features did Gnome remove?
    A: Fewer than KDE.
    In order to show that, you actually have to count the number of features.

    Originally posted by Honton View Post
    Well I did read the last couple of release notes for KDE, and they were boring and didn't provide anything like the new stuff in Gnome 3.12. You might as well just admit that it is a long time since KDE made a decent release.
    Again, you said, and I quote:
    Originally posted by Honton
    Q: How many features did Gnome add?
    A: A ton more than KDE.
    Again, this is a quantitative comparison, which means you actually have to show numbers, not just point out that it is your opinion that Gnome features are more interesting.

    Of course you can't do that, because you know it isn't true.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheBlackCat
    replied
    Originally posted by Honton View Post
    The dumbed down baloo search stuff is a major feature regression. You can pit that against the tracker improvements and search accelators for Gnome-Shell.
    Even if there were actually any user-facing features removed, which there wasn't, that is grand total of one, and it is only looking at KDE. If you are going to do a comparison, you actually have to compare, not just point to one example from one side.

    Originally posted by Honton View Post
    You might want to check out the release notes for Gnome 3.12.
    Again, looking at just one side isn't a comparison. But you know that, you just are dodging the questions because you know you were spouting B.S.

    Leave a comment:


  • sarmad
    replied
    Originally posted by lakerssuperman View Post
    No, it was correct as wrote it. Please don't change my words to suit the reply you want to post. I was talking about the traditional desktop experience sans touch and perhaps I didn't make that clear enough. Gnome is clearly not that desktop. They have crafted a new experience which is distinct in many ways from the traditional desktop experience especially with the focus on touch. That's fine and I have no problem with that, I was simply pointing to the number of stories and comments out there where people state that Gnome's difference from the traditional desktop doesn't suit them as it doesn't suit me. It does suit many people, such as yourself, and that's cool.

    Also don't attempt to reprimand me for something I didn't do. I said, "I, like many others, think this is a bad move" with the implication that this is my opinion and not a fact. If you assumed it was a fact, then that was the error as I made no attempt to pass it off as anything more than a viewpoint that has been echoed in the Linux community that I happen to share.

    Have a nice day.
    Well, I am sorry for the wrong accusations. I didn't mean to; I just couldn't phrase my thoughts correctly. So, let me fix it:

    Originally posted by lakerssuperman
    I understand that Gnome is targeting this type of form factor, but I, like many others, think this is a bad move and it takes away from the desktop experience I prefer.
    Fixed.
    Don't think of your own experience as THE desktop experience.
    By the way, I don't have a touch screen. I use Gnome Shell with a keyboard and a mouse.

    Leave a comment:


  • RahulSundaram
    replied
    Originally posted by lakerssuperman View Post
    My apologies, I was referencing this article:

    https://blogs.gnome.org/mclasen/2014...-now-popovers/

    The darker "cut/copy/paste" popover style in the article is not enable by default as per the comments.
    That is not true either. I am using the darker popover style in GNOME Notes for several months now. It is enabled by default. Nothing specific to touch screens.

    Leave a comment:


  • lakerssuperman
    replied
    Originally posted by sarmad View Post
    Fixed.

    Don't post your own opinion as a fact. I am a hard core desktop user and I found Gnome Shell to be the most suitable for me.
    No, it was correct as wrote it. Please don't change my words to suit the reply you want to post. I was talking about the traditional desktop experience sans touch and perhaps I didn't make that clear enough. Gnome is clearly not that desktop. They have crafted a new experience which is distinct in many ways from the traditional desktop experience especially with the focus on touch. That's fine and I have no problem with that, I was simply pointing to the number of stories and comments out there where people state that Gnome's difference from the traditional desktop doesn't suit them as it doesn't suit me. It does suit many people, such as yourself, and that's cool.

    Also don't attempt to reprimand me for something I didn't do. I said, "I, like many others, think this is a bad move" with the implication that this is my opinion and not a fact. If you assumed it was a fact, then that was the error as I made no attempt to pass it off as anything more than a viewpoint that has been echoed in the Linux community that I happen to share.

    Have a nice day.

    Leave a comment:


  • lakerssuperman
    replied
    Originally posted by RahulSundaram View Post
    I don't think popovers are a phenomal new GTK innovation but yeah it is a minor but nice feature to have. As to the general target, refer to

    http://www.linux.com/news/software/a...12-and-beyond/

    "Matthias: Our primary target is laptops and desktops"

    You are wrong about the idea that popovers aren't enabled unless there is a touch screen. It is just a regular widget and there are tons of modern desktops and laptops being sold which are touch enabled. This along with high def screens are what a lot of people end up buying these days and since they already use touch screens on their mobile phones and tables, it is a natural way of working for them say for zooming into a picture or swiping off apps. I used to be pretty sceptical about this till I tried it out on a regular basis. Even if you are not using touch screens, the focus on them often ends up helping mouse and especially trackpad users since they have a larger surface target and it is easier to navigate even if the trackpad is a bit too sensitive or you are older person with less fine grained motor control.
    My apologies, I was referencing this article:

    https://blogs.gnome.org/mclasen/2014...-now-popovers/

    The darker "cut/copy/paste" popover style in the article is not enable by default as per the comments.

    Leave a comment:


  • lakerssuperman
    replied
    Originally posted by finalzone View Post
    Disagree because the desktop experience is still present but less distracting. It seems familiarity and habit from traditional desktops play factors on your preferences. I know engineers and software developers who daily Gnome Shell without problem because it improves their productivities.
    That's an assumption about my preferences that I don't really agree with. I try many new things. I don't even mind Unity and I've ran Gnome Shell for awhile. Gnome is much different than the traditional desktop and it clearly has its own workflow in mind. I can make Gnome work with a few extensions, but I don't work as well with Gnome as it currently is constructed as I do with other desktops. Just because I don't like how Gnome flows doesn't mean I'm stuck in my ways.

    And as anecdotal evidence goes I could cite many people who don't like touch in Gnome because it A) doesn't provide a compelling alternative in the form factor they are using or B) people don't like touching their screens and getting them dirty.

    Leave a comment:

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