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KDE's Nepomuk Doesn't Seem To Have A Future

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  • liam
    replied
    Originally posted by russofris View Post
    Quite the opposite. I'm saying it was defined in the 80s, and hasn't changed. Again, my analogies are perfect, and you continue to reinforce them. Trains, planes, and automobiles. Three distinct modes of transportation that will never replace each other. Each with it's own use, purpose, and user interface. If MS were to make a train or aircraft, it would have a steering wheel, accelerator pedal, turn signal, and break pedal, and release it under the guise of UI convergence. Pilots and engineers would be infuriated and bewildered in the same manner as Metro Desktop users.

    We're in the 'post rail' era, yet trains aren't going anywhere and continue to evolve independently of the other options. We're in the 'Post Automobile' era because we have taken flight, yet automobiles continue to evolve independently of aircraft. We're in the 'post PC' era, but that doesn't mean that the PC is done, and that there needs to be some convergence for the sake of convergence.

    I'm loving the trolling BTW. Pretty awesome. I love how you argue my point for me, feign ignorance, and pretend to not know what a PC is. That's pretty cool. Alternatively, you might just be a UI developer at MS/Canonical and have imbibed from the kool-aid fountain of incompetence.
    Since you're refusing to provide me with a definition I'll provide my own: a PC is a computing device that has at least two input methods. So, a tablet, and potentially a phone, both meet the criteria.
    The fact that you keep calling your analogies perfect is... odd. Analogies are, by their nature, decidedly not perfect. They work over some subset of characteristics in which similarity exists. If they are perfect they are no longer analogies and their referents are identical. I don't think you're trying to say that a PC is a train.
    Also, you said helicopter not plane. Helicopters and "planes" (assuming planes as they exist now) DO serve different purposes (the big difference occurring with takeoff/landing). ALSO, you continue to use the word "never"n which is really what struck me to begin with. I simply don't know how you can make such absolute pronouncements when the truth is far from clear. What is certain is that the use of trains has become more specialized in certain areas. It used to be primarily a people mover now it is mostly used for transporting goods (afaict). Planes themselves have also been repurposed as goods transporters in addition to moving people. Things adapt despite their original uses. That is exactly what's happening with mobile devices. Right now, IMHO, they aren't quite powerful enough but they are amazingly close (a more highly clocked a7 might be powerful enough). I'm not trolling. I think you are wrong.

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  • TheBlackCat
    replied
    Originally posted by liam View Post
    I worded my responses carefully so as to avoid people inferring just what you did.
    In large metro areas trains are still heavily used (well, in the northeast at any rate) but pretty much everywhere else cars have just utterly supplanted trains as the primary people mover.
    In the U.S. Not so much in Europe, where the train system is much more developed.

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  • liam
    replied
    Originally posted by erendorn View Post
    Trains have been supplanted in some regions, for some uses, which is far from disappearing.
    Actually there might be more trains today in most region than during when the train had the biggest market share among transportation means. The fact that cars and truck have become ubiquitous and gained most of the market share does not mean that the train in itself is any less used.
    I worded my responses carefully so as to avoid people inferring just what you did.
    In large metro areas trains are still heavily used (well, in the northeast at any rate) but pretty much everywhere else cars have just utterly supplanted trains as the primary people mover.

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  • anda_skoa
    replied
    Originally posted by Cyber Killer View Post
    Since ~2-3 years, they changed the naming because I got no idea why.
    As far as I understand mostly because they realised that it didn't make any sense anymore to refer to every single product of their portfolio with the same name.
    Much like Adobe is now the name of the company, its products being Photoshop, etc. and them having a "bundle" called Creative Suite.

    In both cases the name of the original product has now become the name of the vendor, each product usually being referred to by a combination of vendor name and product name, e.g. Adobe Photoshop, KDE Kontact.

    Originally posted by Cyber Killer View Post
    From then "KDE" means the people behind KDE Community, and the desktop is called "KDE SC" (software compilation).
    No, KDE Software Compilation refers to the "bundle", the combination of a large portion of the KDE product portfolio. Like on the example of Adobe the Adobe Creative Suite.
    The desktop is called "Plasma Desktop" or with the vendor name prefixed as "KDE Plasma Desktop".

    Actually pretty easy and consistent once one realises that the same concept is widely used by basically all vendors with a wide product range.

    Cheers,
    _

    Leave a comment:


  • Cyber Killer
    replied
    Originally posted by doom_Oo7 View Post
    Since when KDE doesn't mean K Desktop Environment ? <__<
    Since ~2-3 years, they changed the naming because I got no idea why. From then "KDE" means the people behind KDE Community, and the desktop is called "KDE SC" (software compilation). Though I have yet to find anyone who doesn't call the desktop just "KDE" like in the old days.

    Leave a comment:


  • russofris
    replied
    Originally posted by liam View Post
    So you're saying you aren't able to define it?
    Quite the opposite. I'm saying it was defined in the 80s, and hasn't changed. Again, my analogies are perfect, and you continue to reinforce them. Trains, planes, and automobiles. Three distinct modes of transportation that will never replace each other. Each with it's own use, purpose, and user interface. If MS were to make a train or aircraft, it would have a steering wheel, accelerator pedal, turn signal, and break pedal, and release it under the guise of UI convergence. Pilots and engineers would be infuriated and bewildered in the same manner as Metro Desktop users.

    We're in the 'post rail' era, yet trains aren't going anywhere and continue to evolve independently of the other options. We're in the 'Post Automobile' era because we have taken flight, yet automobiles continue to evolve independently of aircraft. We're in the 'post PC' era, but that doesn't mean that the PC is done, and that there needs to be some convergence for the sake of convergence.

    I'm loving the trolling BTW. Pretty awesome. I love how you argue my point for me, feign ignorance, and pretend to not know what a PC is. That's pretty cool. Alternatively, you might just be a UI developer at MS/Canonical and have imbibed from the kool-aid fountain of incompetence.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheBlackCat
    replied
    Originally posted by doom_Oo7 View Post
    Since when KDE doesn't mean K Desktop Environment ? <__<
    Since about 5 years ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • doom_Oo7
    replied
    Originally posted by TheBlackCat View Post
    KDE is a community.

    Since when KDE doesn't mean K Desktop Environment ? <__<

    Leave a comment:


  • TheBlackCat
    replied
    KDE is a community. Plasma workspaces is a desktop environment implemented by KDE, but it is not the same thing as KDE.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheBlackCat
    replied
    Originally posted by justinzane View Post
    I've never seen someone recommending using Nepomuk for finding a particular bit of code in the way that one would use grep or find on the console.
    Yeah, I am sure most users would love to spend an hour waiting for grep to scan through gigabytes of files. And how, exactly, do you expect to use grep on a binary word processor document or image metadata? The point of modern search programs is that they use a index so you don't need to scan each file line-by-line one-at-a-time.

    Leave a comment:

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