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Gedit For GNOME 3.12 Receives Brand New UI

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  • tuubi
    replied
    Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post
    Since for some reason this thread has turned into a war about Nautilus removing features and how that makes it "less cluttered" for non-power-users, allow me to introduce you all to Nemo:
    [Image removed]
    Amazingly simple, definitely easy to use (even if you're a "newbie"), yet retains all of the old features of Nautilus AND added a few extra. The only real change from "default" is that I changed the view from "Icon" to "Compact" and added a few folders to the sidebar.
    (icons are Numix-Circle, GTK theme is Numix)
    Looks almost as good as Thunar. I mean seriously, the feature list and ui design are similar, but in the end the Xfce file manager looks and feels just a bit slicker to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daktyl198
    replied
    Since for some reason this thread has turned into a war about Nautilus removing features and how that makes it "less cluttered" for non-power-users, allow me to introduce you all to Nemo:



    Amazingly simple, definitely easy to use (even if you're a "newbie"), yet retains all of the old features of Nautilus AND added a few extra. The only real change from "default" is that I changed the view from "Icon" to "Compact" and added a few folders to the sidebar.
    (icons are Numix-Circle, GTK theme is Numix)

    Leave a comment:


  • ObiWan
    replied
    As stated KWrite is the KDE version of GEdit



    But vanilla there isn't much difference to kate

    Leave a comment:


  • zanny
    replied
    Since a lot of people called it cluttered, look, I made Kate into the new gedit: https://i.imgur.com/3oWntRf.png

    Leave a comment:


  • devius
    replied
    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
    Well you see, the problem is yours. What is better, to provide a fully featured and cluttered file manager as the default for everyone, or provide a basic usable one for the masses, and let the developer pick another more advanced tool to do his job?
    Except that the features that were removed didn't cause any clutter because they were accessible through keyboard shortcuts. I'm all for clean interfaces, just don't remove features that are useful and don't interfere with the cleanliness in any way. And please don't turn people's expectations upside down just because. I'm talking about the type-ahead search thing here.
    Every single file manager, web browser, file picker, out there (except the new Nautilus 3.8+) accepts keyboard input for jumping to the next filename that starts with the typed letters. Why would Gnome devs think that it would be a good idea to break that expectation and instead do a recursive search that could return multiple results that all look the same and don't have any kind of context to point at which is the right one? How is this helping new and old users discover the files they want? Here's a hint: it isn't.

    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
    That is the main problem with Linux geeks. They think that what they need should be the default for everyone. And then they complain that Linux doesn't get more market share...
    Nope, they complain about useful features being removed and not being possible to bring them back, independently of what the defaults may be.

    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
    It is better to have i light clean environment for everyone and let advanced users add to it, than to force a kitchen-sink approach to everyone...
    Agreed, except that Gnome isn't letting advanced users add to it. That's the problem!

    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
    Gnome devs are right...
    Well, even some Gnome devs don't like the constant removal of features without providing alternatives, so if you're talking about those devs then I agree with you The ones that are fueling these disruptive changes are clearly trying something new and that's good, but it also brings some negative aspects. Time will tell if the end result will be positive or negative in terms of user experience. Right now, a lot of decisions seem to be more experimental and intuition based than actually experience and user driven.

    Disclaimer: I used to like the direction Gnome 3 was going until the removal of type-ahead find. Yep, just that one decision was enough to sway me to the other side.

    PS: "The problem is yours" really sounds like "you're holding it wrong".

    Leave a comment:


  • TemplarGR
    replied
    Originally posted by devius View Post
    There's a reason for that, and what you describe is actually the problem: the removal of features that power users need. Maybe your girlfriend doesn't care about having a fully featured file manager, with the ability to split windows, quickly jump to a file by typing a few letters of its filename, or being able to navigate through the file system tree, but most power users do need these features. I mean, it's not like it's impossible to do work without them, it's just that it's a lot more trouble than it should be. And why? Because 1 or 2 Nautilus maintainers (literally, I watched the bug reports about some of the key features that were removed) are convinced those features aren't needed, despite a few dozen other developers (even Gnome developers) telling them they need them and use them every day.

    That's the main problem: not listening to what your users are saying. They have the right to ignore users all they want, but the result will be a reduction in the installed user base, mainly within the developer community. I know not everybody will flee Gnome, but it will become less and less attractive to developers.

    Well you see, the problem is yours. What is better, to provide a fully featured and cluttered file manager as the default for everyone, or provide a basic usable one for the masses, and let the developer pick another more advanced tool to do his job?

    That is the main problem with Linux geeks. They think that what they need should be the default for everyone. And then they complain that Linux doesn't get more market share...

    Here is the reality: Most people on Earth don't need an advanced file manager. Even i don't need it, and i am a developer. Most of the time i prefer a nice clean file manager to an advanced one. If and when i want something more, i know where to get it, and forgive me for asking, but you do know you can install different file managers in Gnome, right?

    It is better to have i light clean environment for everyone and let advanced users add to it, than to force a kitchen-sink approach to everyone... Gnome devs are right...

    Leave a comment:


  • TemplarGR
    replied
    Originally posted by Pawlerson View Post
    The problem with gnome is obvious. It's messed up DE that tries to copy android and ios. It seems they don't see the difference between PC and smartphone. People complain, because they have real reasons to do so. Your sweet talk won't change the reality. Furthermore KDE isn't windows copy. It's far more advanced and better. Gnome is made by morons and aimed mostly for morons. There's no logical explanation for their idiotic decisions.
    KDE is just a Windows copy. The only puprose of it is to showcase every bell and whistle of Qt in order for Digia to make money. That is all there is to it...

    They don't care about making a stable and usable DE, they only care about showcasing every new feature of Qt...

    Whenever Qt makes a new version, KDE's leadership makes a target to use its new features, not because they are useful, but just because.

    Also, Gnome does not copy smartphone DEs. Smartphone DEs don't have concepts like workspaces and desktop searches. Just because it doesn't have a start menu doesn't mean it is a smartphone DE. That is what morons think...

    Leave a comment:


  • devius
    replied
    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
    It is not GNOME you hate, it is change. People always love to criticize progress. It is the "hip" thing to do...
    I actually like Gnome Shell and I don't think it's as bad as most haters make it seem, and I agree with you that most of the time it's change that people dislike. I also like Unity, and I went back to Ubuntu after a few years with Fedora and OpenSUSE when the first usable version of Unity was promoted to the main DE (in 11.04 I think).

    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
    What is so wrong with GNOME?
    That said there are some things wrong with Gnome, mainly in the way that some very important design decisions are handled.

    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
    It provides much useful screen area for work
    Here's the first problem. This is just not true. Compare the useful screen area of even Gnome 3.10 to Unity and it's clear there's a lot of wasted space. Just try Firefox and look at the huge amount of grey empty areas in the window. It's ridiculous, and it's made even worse by the gigantic title bars in every application and the huge amount of padding around every single element. I remember KDE-bashers-Gnome-lovers criticizing KDE due to the huge amount of empty grey areas on every window, and now they did something even worse. Gnome should disable installing itself on systems with less than 1000 vertical pixels, because any less than that and there will be pain. There will be windows with buttons outside the screen area.

    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
    I simply can't understand what it is that you criticize. I have given an Arch GNOME desktop to my girlfriend who is no IT professional, and she never was troubled with it. Yet you see Linux geeks in forums complaining for no real reason at all.
    There's a reason for that, and what you describe is actually the problem: the removal of features that power users need. Maybe your girlfriend doesn't care about having a fully featured file manager, with the ability to split windows, quickly jump to a file by typing a few letters of its filename, or being able to navigate through the file system tree, but most power users do need these features. I mean, it's not like it's impossible to do work without them, it's just that it's a lot more trouble than it should be. And why? Because 1 or 2 Nautilus maintainers (literally, I watched the bug reports about some of the key features that were removed) are convinced those features aren't needed, despite a few dozen other developers (even Gnome developers) telling them they need them and use them every day.

    That's the main problem: not listening to what your users are saying. They have the right to ignore users all they want, but the result will be a reduction in the installed user base, mainly within the developer community. I know not everybody will flee Gnome, but it will become less and less attractive to developers.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheBlackCat
    replied
    Originally posted by zanny View Post
    So I use Kate, here it is without anything open: https://i.imgur.com/To29fh9.png

    Is that really "cluttered"? The space of a text document in the window is literally around 90% as much space allocated as in this new gedit, but I have dozens of other circumstantial tools to use that, while plugins, are at my fingertips.

    And if I used the menu-in-the-title-bar KDE option I'd have some more space back.
    You should point out that you have added a ton of optional stuff to that. Kate has a lot of plugins, but they aren't enabled by default.

    Further, kate is an advanced text editor, practically a mini-IDE. The proper comparison would be with kwrite.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kostas
    replied
    Originally posted by zanny View Post
    So I use Kate, here it is without anything open: https://i.imgur.com/To29fh9.png

    Is that really "cluttered"?
    Wow that's terrible. Reminds me why I couldn't use KTorrent. It's obvious the KDE fans are vastly different to the rest of us if they can't see how awful this is.

    Originally posted by kigurai View Post
    Jeesh, can we at least keep the discussion somewhat civilized.
    It's a known troll account, you might as well not bother feeding it.

    Leave a comment:

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