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Open-Source Blu-ray Decryption Library For Linux

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  • Open-Source Blu-ray Decryption Library For Linux

    Phoronix: Open-Source Blu-ray Decryption Library For Linux

    Some days ago there was an update released to VideoLAN's libbluray Blu-ray library that began supporting BD-J Java and other new functionality. Making news now is another but separate open-source Blu-ray news...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU1ODc

  • #2
    That's a weird development process. There was a discussion about BluRay decryption in: http://phoronix.com/forums/showthrea...es-(libbluray)

    There was info about libbdplus months ago (but not sources), then we page was removed. Meanwhile libmmbd was developed and released (!!!). Now when we have libmmbd, libbdplus appears again... :|

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    • #3
      libaacs and libbdplus are fully open-source and work in a standalone way, while apparently libmmbd seems to be little more than a wrapper using MakeMKV for all the dirty work. And MakeMKV is closed source.
      That may be one of the reasons libbdplus was revived.
      If this works as well as libdvdcss, I may actually buy a Bluray drive and bluray films.
      This DRM stuff is such a crap : in the end, only the people who want to legally buy bluray disks are really penalized.

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      • #4
        Actually I believe it was released right around the 25th of December (at least, that is when the AUR package was posted). I did find it odd that it released with almost no real mention, and I don't really see any directions out there to make it work (i.e. how to get the key/set it up/etc).

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rvdboom View Post
          This DRM stuff is such a crap : in the end, only the people who want to legally buy bluray disks are really penalized.
          I agree, but speaking of people who want to legally buy blurays, does this mean i can now play commercial blurays on my linux box without installing proprietary stuff? (in that case, i'd buy some)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by dstaubsauger View Post
            I agree, but speaking of people who want to legally buy blurays, does this mean i can now play commercial blurays on my linux box without installing proprietary stuff? (in that case, i'd buy some)
            That makes no sense. Why would you support DRM by buying Blu-rays, no matter if you can hack it or not...

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            • #7
              Use case is obvious: someone gave you a collection of Blu-ray discs

              Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
              That makes no sense. Why would you support DRM by buying Blu-rays, no matter if you can hack it or not...
              If you already have a Blu-ray burner used for backup or file distribution and someone gives you a collection of Blu-ray movies, it's nice to have a true FOSS
              way to crack the encryption and play them. Same if some merchant you buy something from (a monitor, maybe?)throws in a free Blu-ray movie as an incentive.

              As for laws "restricting" this, nobody has been prosecuted or sued for using libdvdcss, and the DeeCSS cases all fell apart on free speech grounds and in any
              even concerned only code distribution. Get it and use it without fear-Hollywood has no way to search your root filesystem for binaries, just as they cannot
              search your hard drive if you are not connected to a filesharing program. Even if you are, they cannot see anything NOT being shared. Screw Hollywood and
              their lawyers, crack and enjoy...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
                That makes no sense. Why would you support DRM by buying Blu-rays, no matter if you can hack it or not...
                Image quality is much better on Blu-ray.

                I bought a Blu-ray movie but I refuse to buy a standalone Blu-ray player or friggin' $100 player software for my computer just so I can play a damn Blu-ray. (I have a BD-ROM drive.) So eventually I'm just going to rip it and throw the disc in the trash.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
                  That makes no sense. Why would you support DRM by buying Blu-rays, no matter if you can hack it or not...
                  1. My internet connection is too slow for HD (unsuitable for legal streaming services, and still painful for pirating)
                  2. DRM is not the only thing i support by buying a bluray (but also hopefully the people who made the film)
                  3. I cannot put .torrent files on my living room shelves.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
                    That makes no sense. Why would you support DRM by buying Blu-rays, no matter if you can hack it or not...
                    It is the highest quality format for media, giving the best possible video and audio quality, and will be for some time.

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