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  • #41
    Originally posted by Krejzi View Post
    You obviously didn't look very hard:

    https://developer.gnome.org/gtk3/stable/
    Yes, I am sure if you search other websites you can also find simple Qt tutorials. The question was about the official homepage.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by TheBlackCat View Post
      Yes, I am sure if you search other websites you can also find simple Qt tutorials. The question was about the official homepage.
      That *is* the official Gtk documentation. And if by "official homepage" you mean gtk.org, then you just go the the Documentation tab, and follow any of the links at the top, which take you to the developer.gnome.org pages that Krejzi referred to.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by TheBlackCat View Post
        Yes, I am sure if you search other websites you can also find simple Qt tutorials. The question was about the official homepage.
        Is this official enough?

        http://www.gtk.org/documentation.php

        Clicking on "GTK stable" will take you to the very same page I linked to in previous post.

        Also, if you look closely, you can find hyperlink "Documentation" that links to the very same page here

        http://www.gtk.org/

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        • #44
          For me the question is simple: Want portability? Try Qt. Want your program best for Linux? Use Gtk.
          Originally posted by LightBit View Post
          For those who prefer pure C there is also Tk.
          The value of pure C comes from its excellent ABI compatibility.
          You may use any modern C compiler to link a C library, but you have to build your own C++ library if you were using a different C++ compiler the one built the C++ library.

          I once tried to link my VS2008 program to a VS2005 C++ lib (it's also my own one but I was too lazy to rebuild it). I met many strange problems in debugging.
          After that, I would build Qt 4.x by myself as Qt's official buildings only (at that time) had VS 2008 version, while I was using VC 2010 Express.
          Last edited by zxy_thf; 10-17-2013, 06:18 PM.

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          • #45
            Originally posted by Silverthorn View Post
            I tried to look through the official page for some simple example to get me started but I just ended up on the starting page again pointing me towards Qt creator. A bit frustrating after a while. You probably get a better experience once you get to know the page better.
            I am not at all familiar with the website, in fact I have never used it before. I just did:
            http://qt-project.org/ > Documentation > Examples and Tutorials. On the right side there was a pretty clear "select version" if that is what you want.

            Originally posted by Silverthorn View Post
            This page (plus the reference manual) was enough to get me started with gtk:
            https://developer.gnome.org/gtk3/sta...g-started.html
            So in other words you had to go to a completely separate web page from the official gtk page to find the resources you need. How would someone visiting the gtk website for the first time ever guess that they need to go to a completely different website to figure out how to use it?

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            • #46
              Originally posted by Krejzi View Post
              Is this official enough?

              http://www.gtk.org/documentation.php

              Clicking on "GTK stable" will take you to the very same page I linked to in previous post.
              I see. I never looked there because it never occurred to me that "Hello World" would be under "API Documentation", which on every other language or toolkit website I have been to has the documentation for the API, not "Hello World" examples. Usually such things are under "Examples" or "Tutorials".

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              • #47
                Originally posted by mark45 View Post
                From the article:
                Gtk is a third-class citizen on Windows. Gtk3 hasn't even been ported, the latest "stable" Window$ port is an old version of Gtk2 - not the latest Gtk2 version, but an old version of Gtk2.
                This is not exactly true. There are no official win32 binaries to download (mainly because no-one stepped up to do so, though I remember it being discussed on the mailing list not too long ago), but the source does compile for win32, and for instance Fedora even has mingw-gtk3 binaries. Same goes for the latest gtk2.

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by Pawlerson View Post
                  Thanks, but no. springlobby client which uses WxWidgets is terribly slow and ugly.
                  wxWidgets isn't slow. Any end user more slower than any GUI toolkit. Application could be slow if algorithms inside is slow.
                  wxWidgets uses native widgets, just don't use ugly themes in your OS and you'll be happy.
                  Last edited by kosenko; 10-17-2013, 08:26 PM.

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                  • #49
                    I saw something some time ago, reading through the history of Krita, about an incomplete KDE port for GIMP called "kimp". It caused nothing but a flamefest, but became the foundation for Krita.

                    This time is the turning point to do something like that. Less and less apps are going to use GTK 3 and more apps will use Qt 5. And remember: with Qt 5.2, there are no KDELibs anymore; Qt 5.2 marks the point where Qt and KDE Frameworks 5 become one.
                    Last edited by Alejandro Nova; 10-17-2013, 09:35 PM.

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                    • #50
                      Originally posted by TheBlackCat View Post
                      I see. I never looked there because it never occurred to me that "Hello World" would be under "API Documentation", which on every other language or toolkit website I have been to has the documentation for the API, not "Hello World" examples. Usually such things are under "Examples" or "Tutorials".
                      What's your point? You claimed there were no official tutorials for Gtk3, now you're finding endless more complaints after people pointed out that it took half a second to find them on Google, the first hit under the most obvious of keywords "gtk3 tutorials"...

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