Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

GNOME 3.x Will Bring Back Some GNOME 2 Features

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • kigurai
    replied
    Originally posted by movieman View Post
    Overloading 'move' to sometimes mean 'resize' is crazy when it's otherwise as simple as clicking a button on the window, and it's completely baffling to a user who has no idea of what they've done: 'I was moving it and suddenly it went all big and won't move any more. WTF?'. Then again, so is the entire 'invisible magic rectangle' paradigm of UI design.
    Except that you get a quite visible overlay that shows you what is going to happen. I would guess most people will make the connection pretty fast.

    Leave a comment:


  • kigurai
    replied
    Originally posted by Thanatopsis View Post
    You lie about being a programmer and how well GNOME 3 supports the workflow of a programmer in response to a software engineers complaints on GNOME 3's workflow. You get caught in the lie and try to dodge the bullet with this crap. Is this is best you can do?
    Well, if you, random stranger on the Internet says so, then it must be true.
    Real programmers obviously use desktop environments that improve their productivity so much that they have lots of time to be rude to people on the Internet.
    In that case, I think I much prefer being some kind of "fake" developer. Seems better for my blood pressure

    Leave a comment:


  • ElderSnake
    replied
    Originally posted by movieman View Post
    I just switched to XFCE, with the intention of using it for a while until I switched from Ubuntu to Mint. But this version is good enough that I don't know if I'll ever want to go back to Gnome. I keep trying KDE, but I never found a good reason to stick with it.
    That's okay, KDE is not for everyone.

    XFCE is a seriously good alternative to GNOME because it seems have gotten pretty close to Gnome 2 functionality whilst having some perks of it's own. And you have to admire the way they've stuck to their tradtional ways rather go with this tablet-like, locked-down, vendor "branding" and marketing trend. To me that whole thing is a fad, helped by the Fruit Company and their shiny products.

    I foresee the typical desktop will not disappear anytime soon and may even make a comeback once people get sick of getting cramps using touchscreens for serious work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hamish Wilson
    replied
    Originally posted by Thanatopsis View Post
    No. If he claims to be something he's not he's a liar.
    But you have nothing to base that on other than the fact he uses Gnome Shell. I am sorry, that does not make him not a programmer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fenrin
    replied
    Originally posted by 3coma3 View Post
    So now people who you disagree with are trolls and have to disappear or be hunted. It's so nice to see these displays of common sense.
    My previous last sentence about better weapons for the gnomes to hunt trolls was meant as joke. I thought this was more obvious.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thanatopsis
    replied
    Originally posted by Hamish Wilson View Post
    Sure, if he disagrees with you he is a liar. Sure.
    No. If he claims to be something he's not he's a liar.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hamish Wilson
    replied
    Originally posted by 3coma3 View Post
    I repeat to you, seeing as you seem so interested in answers: go read, read a lot of facts you don't take into account. This isn't about ugly software. This is about (just an example) making systemd a requirement for GNOME, and making systemd a requirement for udev. These systems are *all* made by the same people. Forcing downstream distros to use your software isn't exactly healthy competition, and these and many other tactics employed by these people show that new elements have to be taken into account to see the whole picture. Make a list of what company all these developers are employees, and then you really will to make your effort to continue to see that everything is peachy.
    This is the first time I have heard someone use Red Hat's FOSS contributions against them, and it makes for an interesting if somewhat tedious argument. It might have some value if Red Hat were directly making money from Gnome, or SystemD, and the myriad of other projects they are involved with, but they are not (at least not directly, they are of course profiting handily from a healthy Linux ecosystem) so your argument for control seems somewhat baffling. What I see is Red Hat trying to make an effort to push Linux forward, and that sometimes involves the cooperation of different parts. Red Hat's position behind all of these parts can be easily explained by realizing just how much of Linux Red Hat has contributed in the first place. I am not going to scald them for it, especially since the control element is mooted in a free software ecosystem anyway (as in gentoo forked udev, for instance).

    Originally posted by 3coma3 View Post
    So now people who you disagree with are trolls and have to disappear or be hunted. It's so nice to see these displays of common sense.
    You might actually have a point here - Fenrin may have needed some time to cool off before posting.

    Originally posted by Thanatopsis View Post
    You lie about being a programmer and how well GNOME 3 supports the workflow of a programmer in response to a software engineers complaints on GNOME 3's workflow. You get caught in the lie and try to dodge the bullet with this crap. Is this is best you can do?
    Sure, if he disagrees with you he is a liar. Sure.

    Leave a comment:


  • movieman
    replied
    Originally posted by scionicspectre View Post
    Assuming that you're actually asking this question, you can maximize a window more easily by dragging it to the window edge you would like it to fill (top to fill the whole screen), or if your screen is especially large, just double-click on any portion of the titlebar. This is clearly much easier than aiming for a square button on the edge of a window, but perhaps not as discoverable as some would like.
    I'm not sure when Linux DEs started doing this, but it's one of the behaviours I most hate and have to turn off every time I start using a new one. I'm sick of moving windows around and having them suddenly go full-screen because I accidentally moved into some invisible random magic rectangle.

    Overloading 'move' to sometimes mean 'resize' is crazy when it's otherwise as simple as clicking a button on the window, and it's completely baffling to a user who has no idea of what they've done: 'I was moving it and suddenly it went all big and won't move any more. WTF?'. Then again, so is the entire 'invisible magic rectangle' paradigm of UI design.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thanatopsis
    replied
    Originally posted by kigurai View Post
    I see you have found Google. Good for you! It will help you in many ways!
    If you want to believe your e-penis is bigger than mine, then go ahead. It is Friday after all!
    You lie about being a programmer and how well GNOME 3 supports the workflow of a programmer in response to a software engineers complaints on GNOME 3's workflow. You get caught in the lie and try to dodge the bullet with this crap. Is this is best you can do?

    Pathetic.

    Leave a comment:


  • movieman
    replied
    Originally posted by ElderSnake View Post
    I have to agree, my seriously incompatible workflow with Gnome Shell and my will to actually be able to customise things drove me to KDE too, which has been getting seriously awesome(IMO).
    I just switched to XFCE, with the intention of using it for a while until I switched from Ubuntu to Mint. But this version is good enough that I don't know if I'll ever want to go back to Gnome. I keep trying KDE, but I never found a good reason to stick with it.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X