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KDE Software Compilation 4.4 Released

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  • #41
    Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
    What about running the same test with gnome-
    Scrolling speed of the default terminal... Does Gnome have nothing better to offer to hint at?
    They removed icons from menus/buttons in one of last releases. A major feature, since as benchmarked the windows do appear faster now.
    It also increased productivity as users are no longer distracted by icons. Seriously who would want icons on menu and buttons? It did nothing but distract poor souls.

    Anyway Gnome in most cases has just one button per window as having two of them would be distracting so removing the icons makes perfect sense anyway

    As for scrolling in terminal I think they should disable it. It would save some space for terminal content. Oh and the whole terminal thing should be disabled in default Gnome install and only enabled with some secret gconf setting/key. I mean normal users do not use terminal anyway and too many icons in applications menu must be distracting for them.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
      I have used SuSE since version 6 I believe, and it had always been horrible.

      The last time I checked the install speed was with the first version of OpenSuSE that came with a Qt 4.x installer.

      For a full HDD replacement (Samsung 1TB sata drive) it took 2 hours. Fact. Kubuntu 9.10, in the same setting, took 20 minutes on that very same system. Fact.

      I do hope that since that release, things have changed. Otherwise your argument is lie.
      I've used SuSE since the early days as well. Yes a lot has changed. openSUSE has been using a image based install (not to mention the huge increases in performance of zypper that rivals apt-get) for quite some time and at NO time have I ever seen it take longer then a windows install (even over net installs) Comparing it to Kubuntu is a bit of a joke. You want to compare install speeds with Kubuntu then compare the live-CD install since you are installing roughly the same amount of packages then. If it took 2 hours to install something is VERY screwed with your system (DMA issue perhaps with your optical drive forcing it into PIO mode). I just did a full KDE install on a Athlon XP 1500+ system with the DVD complete with development packages, 1 Gig of ram and a 5400 RPM 40 Gig HD and it was around 10 minutes to install.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by kraftman View Post
        @Blackstar

        Not to mention that xterm runs so much faster on KDE 3.5 than on 4.4. It's amazing how anyone could stand to use KDE 4.4 with such bad xterm performance.
        Someone should probably blame graphic drivers rather then DE. If I compare KDE 3.5 apps scrolling speed to Gnome apps scrolling speed, KDE 3.5 will be probably a clear winner.
        Thanks, for a moment I thought my trollbait was too obvious. Good, I'm not losing my touch!

        Originally posted by V!NCENT
        Originally posted by kernelOfTruth
        there was a benchmark which compared all of the x-terms some years ago and gnome-terminal was the clear winner - xterm was the slowest
        What about running the same test with gnome-terminal and konsole, but then 1000 instances of both at the same time?
        Gnome is better than KDE in something and you change the goalposts in order to make it look bad. Typical KDE fanboi behavior. Also, I'd like to see some measurement on gnome-terminal vs konsole shared memory.

        Btw, the comparison was between konsole3 and konsole4, not gnome-terminal and konsole - but trust a KDE fanboi to drag Gnome into the fray. Never too late for some good ol' Gnome-bashing!

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        • #44
          @val-gaav: you are catching on! All Gnome wants is to provide a single, big, solid button that reads, "click me". You click it, it reads your mind and gives you the results (bugs aside). Noob friendly. Menu icons, terminals and the whole other load of s... will be done away once Gnome matures!

          KDE is going in the other direction and wants to provide tiny little shiny buttons for every little thing you might wish to do. You want to scroll down? Click here! Are you sure you want to scroll down? Click yes! Ah, ok, scrolled down, satisfied now? Yes! Did you see how pretty I was while scrolling down? Yes, yes, yes, dammit, just let me do my work! Oh, ok, then I'll just throw a little alpha transparency for you here, just so you don't forget who you are dealing with.

          See? That's why KDE is better!

          (Yes, I'm bored today.)

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          • #45
            Originally posted by val-gaav View Post
            They removed icons from menus/buttons in one of last releases. A major feature, since as benchmarked the windows do appear faster now.
            It also increased productivity as users are no longer distracted by icons. Seriously who would want icons on menu and buttons? It did nothing but distract poor souls.

            Anyway Gnome in most cases has just one button per window as having two of them would be distracting so removing the icons makes perfect sense anyway

            As for scrolling in terminal I think they should disable it. It would save some space for terminal content. Oh and the whole terminal thing should be disabled in default Gnome install and only enabled with some secret gconf setting/key. I mean normal users do not use terminal anyway and too many icons in applications menu must be distracting for them.
            Thanks for cheering up my day

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            • #46
              In my opinion such a news is pretty useless without a changelog...
              ## VGA ##
              AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
              Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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              • #47
                Originally posted by L33F3R View Post
                calm down. top 3 distrowatch entries are gnome distros. You cant tell me, or anyone else that something sucks when you are wrong entirely. It boils down to personal preference so telling someone to like something else is near pointless. No matter how much you bark, those who agree with you will still agree with you and those who dont agree with you wont.
                1) Ubuntu is the top distro because it's the most popular, most targeted toward newbies, and it's probably the easiet to use. The #3 distro listed is Linux Mint - which is still Ubuntu. 1a) Lint Mint has offered KDE for years now.

                2) distrowatch isn't a usage monitor - it's a monitor for number of page hits. Needless to say a distro for bleeding edge people (Fedora) will get more hits than a rolling distro (Arch). I use Gentoo and I don't even visit Gentoo.org so why the heck would I visit the distrowatch page? Those stats useless.

                3) Something being popular doesn't make it great. Bose are the most popular speaker for the average consumer and are considered top of the line. Unfortunately, they suck ass compared to speakers half their price. We are comparing feature for feature and app for app, and Vincent makes a damn good argument.

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
                  Much love for openSUSE here... why?
                  Because they were the only ones who had KDE 4.0.3 even semi-usable, and KDE 4.1.3 on openSUSE 11 was solid as hell. They've been backporting patches from trunk since 2003 so their KDE was always more stable in the past. I don't use it anymore though.

                  Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
                  I have used SuSE since version 6 I believe, and it had always been horrible.

                  The last time I checked the install speed was with the first version of OpenSuSE that came with a Qt 4.x installer.

                  For a full HDD replacement (Samsung 1TB sata drive) it took 2 hours. Fact. Kubuntu 9.10, in the same setting, took 20 minutes on that very same system. Fact.

                  I do hope that since that release, things have changed. Otherwise your argument is lie.
                  I've only used Suse since like version 8 (I was a Redhat guy) but I've never had that problem. The last version I installed was 11.1 I think. I always use the full DVD and I've never had an install that long. Dude you've been using Linux long enough to know: sometimes a distro just takes long as hell on certain computers. No point in holding the grudge - the shit happens.

                  The fact is, all installers suck compared to Sidux. That thing installs faster than you can take a leak.

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                  • #49
                    Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
                    Thanks, for a moment I thought my trollbait was too obvious. Good, I'm not losing my touch!
                    Better bad performance than no performance at all from Gnomes feature lack You may still have the mojo, but you are still getting pwned

                    Gnome is better than KDE in something and you change the goalposts in order to make it look bad. Typical KDE fanboi behavior.
                    No, this newspost is about a KDE release and then some people are comming in telling how much better they think the idiodic feature of extremely fast console scrolling (so fast you can't even read it, so much for usablilty) makes Gnome better than KDE. That is typical GNOME fanboy behavior. You totally lost your mojo here, trollboy...

                    Also, I'd like to see some measurement on gnome-terminal vs konsole shared memory.
                    I'd like to see some systemwide measurement on total system shared memory because I don't give a rats ass about the speed of something that can scroll faster than the human brain can already process anyway. Oh wait, I don't actually care because these measurement I have already read and KDE 4.3 is already better at resource management than Gnome

                    Btw, the comparison was between konsole3 and konsole4,
                    Nope, mr short memmory. The comparison was xterm on KDE 3.5 and xterm on KDE 4...

                    not gnome-terminal and konsole - but trust a KDE fanboi to drag Gnome into the fray. Never too late for some good ol' Gnome-bashing!
                    It's never to late to kick back a troll where he came from

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                    • #50
                      Originally posted by BlackStar View Post
                      KDE is going in the other direction and wants to provide tiny little shiny buttons for every little thing you might wish to do. You want to scroll down? Click here! Are you sure you want to scroll down? Click yes! Ah, ok, scrolled down, satisfied now? Yes! Did you see how pretty I was while scrolling down? Yes, yes, yes, dammit, just let me do my work! Oh, ok, then I'll just throw a little alpha transparency for you here, just so you don't forget who you are dealing with.
                      <being serious>.
                      What you describe here was exactly the case for 3.x series (I have not used earlier ones)... That was quite annoying I must say, but given the choice of (at that moment when I switched to linux around kde 3.2 I think) :
                      - Gnome ok seems simple but how can I do my job here ? Damn I cannot do what I want.
                      - KDE - Damn it's hard I remember I changed that option I need... now where I can find again? ... Ok at least I can do what I want once I find the damn option

                      See given those choices I went with KDE, in hope I will just get used to it.

                      Luckily in KDE4 they went with something in between of those two situations which for me is the greatest feature of new KDE series. The options are there, but reordered in a way that actually makes sense and is user-friendly. No longer will you get one big options menu with thousand of positions (Good example for that is new system settings).

                      KDE4 is so different from 3.5 that I can say I had to learn it almost as a new environment. If I compare my experiences to the kde 3.5 ones it was a lot easier for a newbie to use.

                      </being serious>

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