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GNOME Seeing Much Work On Their "Setup" OEM Style Installer, Key Rack & oo7

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  • GNOME Seeing Much Work On Their "Setup" OEM Style Installer, Key Rack & oo7

    Phoronix: GNOME Seeing Much Work On Their "Setup" OEM Style Installer, Key Rack & oo7

    GNOME developers continue to be very busy with a variety of initiatives thanks to the Sovereign Tech Fund (STF) financing as well as other general development efforts as they work their way toward GNOME 47 in September...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Sounds great but can it save the secrets to TPM?

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    • #3
      I'm glad STF is helping fund more accessibility work. The Setup installer is interesting in the sense that I mistakenly assumed the new web / cockpit based installer would cover all their important use cases.

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      • #4
        I just wish OEMs would preinstall GNU/Linux distros on their machines more often instead of forcing customers to pay for windows even though they might not necessarily need/want it. It's absolutely bizarre how the only GNU/Linux PCs that are sold in brick and retail stores are exclusively cheapo chromebooks. The only times I've seen OEMs selling PCs with normal distributions like ubuntu installed is either hideously overpriced 'developer edition' devices from the likes of dell or lenovo or niche online only manufactures who often just slap their logo on a generic clevo laptop and sell it at a higher markup than other OEMs. Even devices such as handhelds where a GNU/Linux distribution like steam os is more appropriate UX wise companies like asus still insist on windows despite the overall jankiess when combined with whatever 'launcher' app they cooked up in house like asus armory.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Abacus123 View Post
          I just wish OEMs would preinstall GNU/Linux distros on their machines more often instead of forcing customers to pay for windows even though they might not necessarily need/want it. It's absolutely bizarre how the only GNU/Linux PCs that are sold in brick and retail stores are exclusively cheapo chromebooks. The only times I've seen OEMs selling PCs with normal distributions like ubuntu installed is either hideously overpriced 'developer edition' devices from the likes of dell or lenovo or niche online only manufactures who often just slap their logo on a generic clevo laptop and sell it at a higher markup than other OEMs. Even devices such as handhelds where a GNU/Linux distribution like steam os is more appropriate UX wise companies like asus still insist on windows despite the overall jankiess when combined with whatever 'launcher' app they cooked up in house like asus armory.
          Because that's the OS the vast majority of customers are used to and is frankly the safest option for OEMs. They also get Windows licenses for extremely cheap and I've seen a lot of cases where OEMs don't even bother with passing the meager savings to the customer.

          I'd definitely love to see manufacturers put in more effort into ensuring their hardware also runs decently on Linux though. Not slapping brittle BIOSes which break when booting anything non-Windows would be a start.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by fong38 View Post

            Because that's the OS the vast majority of customers are used to and is frankly the safest option for OEMs. They also get Windows licenses for extremely cheap and I've seen a lot of cases where OEMs don't even bother with passing the meager savings to the customer.

            I'd definitely love to see manufacturers put in more effort into ensuring their hardware also runs decently on Linux though. Not slapping brittle BIOSes which break when booting anything non-Windows would be a start.
            Honestly whenever I've purchased a pre-built machine or assembled my desktop I've had little to no issues installing GNU/Linux distributions (at least the mainstream ones like ubuntu, mint, or opensuse). Lenovo, HP, Dell, and others also have their machines 'certified' for ubuntu or red hat for whatever that's worth. Regarding familiarity to windows honestly just use a windows like desktop environment like kde or cinnamon, I've seen people used to windows trying one of them out and they got used to it pretty quickly. Microsoft also loves to change their desktop shell just for the sake of change and they seem to be getting away with it more or less.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by fong38 View Post

              Because that's the OS the vast majority of customers are used to and is frankly the safest option for OEMs. They also get Windows licenses for extremely cheap and I've seen a lot of cases where OEMs don't even bother with passing the meager savings to the customer.

              I'd definitely love to see manufacturers put in more effort into ensuring their hardware also runs decently on Linux though. Not slapping brittle BIOSes which break when booting anything non-Windows would be a start.
              Actually, the reason modern PCs are so cheap is because of all the enforced advertising and tracking that goes into a Windows install regardless of OEM along with skimping on firmware quality testing and very limited support lifetime. Windows is loaded with tracking ads and telemetry for MS services. Intel, AMD, Nvidia and such plaster stickers on cases (yes, those are paid placements). Then MS and OEMs load up their install images with paid for 3rd party crapware, or did you just assume MS was dumping 3rd party stubs in the Windows Start Menu launcher out of the goodness of their greed-green hearts?

              You want to know why System76 and other Linux-only (or other OS specific hardware) computers are more expensive? They don't have all the paid placement crap and intrusive advertising that the Windows world has to strip out while cussing three ways till Sunday. Effing hell, even Windows drivers are phoning home these days snooping on what you'd doing - and most of them don't even ask or notify the user they're doing it. But they're still cheap because the hardware itself is of poorer quality than their high end cousins.

              Truly well built and secure systems are available, but they're not cheap PCs, or any other device the average consumer or even independent plebe developers will have access to. They're mainframes with 4-5 nines of reliability on single nodes, EDAC out the wazoo. They're purpose built navigation and control devices, formally verified systems designed for safety critical environments (and why Linux will never really be anything but an also ran in that ball park). They're expensive, well designed, and some of them are fully formally verified from design to implementation to application. All of that work is fully born by the customer because legally or contractually the certifications they're compliant with can't be compromised by intrusive ads, product placements, unsanctioned telemetry, or taking chances with unproven assumptions.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Abacus123 View Post
                I just wish OEMs would preinstall GNU/Linux distros on their machines more often instead of forcing customers to pay for windows even though they might not necessarily need/want it. It's absolutely bizarre how the only GNU/Linux PCs that are sold in brick and retail stores are exclusively cheapo chromebooks. The only times I've seen OEMs selling PCs with normal distributions like ubuntu installed is either hideously overpriced 'developer edition' devices from the likes of dell or lenovo or niche online only manufactures who often just slap their logo on a generic clevo laptop and sell it at a higher markup than other OEMs. Even devices such as handhelds where a GNU/Linux distribution like steam os is more appropriate UX wise companies like asus still insist on windows despite the overall jankiess when combined with whatever 'launcher' app they cooked up in house like asus armory.
                I think most of the big OEMs, at least the ones that have been around for a while, got burned by the extremely high return rates of Linux netbooks in the mid-late 2000s.

                Really I just want to see things like the Steam Deck and System76 machines available in Best Buy, Costco, and such stores.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by QwertyChouskie View Post
                  Really I just want to see things like the Steam Deck and System76 machines available in Best Buy, Costco, and such stores.
                  System76 are premium-class machines. You'll never see them in Best Buy and Costco.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by intelfx View Post

                    System76 are premium-class machines. You'll never see them in Best Buy and Costco.
                    The base config of the Lemur Pro is $1399, which is less than the $1499 I paid for my 2021 ASUS Zephyrus G14, which I bought from Best Buy. Also, the increased sales of two or three standard configs would likely bring these configs down in cost, due to economy of scale.

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