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GNOME OS Continues Seeing New Features, New GNOME App for Viewing 3D Models

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  • GNOME OS Continues Seeing New Features, New GNOME App for Viewing 3D Models

    Phoronix: GNOME OS Continues Seeing New Features, New GNOME App for Viewing 3D Models

    GNOME developers continue to be quite busy this summer from enhancing their desktop with more security and accessibility features to further crafting GNOME OS...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Cool!

    This new 2D CAD software seems cool, I hope it is very easy to use, because I think that CAD maybe can be a bit difficult.

    This new 3D viewer software is cool too, it's like a bit like the one that was in Windows.

    They're also making a new video player called Showtime which is good that they do that since Totem is still using GTK 3 so it needs to be upgraded to GTK 4 or replaced with a new one. These days I use Celluloid though which is really good because it is based on mpv (but with a GTK 4 frontend) so there is no freezing of frames and such.

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    • #3
      One thing I'd really like to see is that GNOME apps start merging into each other. There is no need to have 5 different video player or terminal apps with partial features and level of support, we need a bit less choice and more solid and fleshed out options that are actually useful for the majority of users.

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      • #4
        I'm not sure that Gnome should develop their own applications. We have a 3d package called Blender to view 3d models. Similarly we have VLC for media playback. Gimp for photo editing.

        They need to work on their core offering to keep up with Windows and Mac. The desktop, software installation GUI, settings and file manager. Maybe they can recommend things to install, but ultimately you don't know if I want a CD player, word processor, or a terminal app...

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        • #5
          Its easy to deduct what was the problem back then looking at teh last point.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by OneTimeShot View Post
            I'm not sure that Gnome should develop their own applications. We have a 3d package called Blender to view 3d models. Similarly we have VLC for media playback. Gimp for photo editing.
            Regarding a 3D viewer, there is a different way to look at this. I used to work in electronics design and manufacturing and used engineering change management software that contained component libraries, bill of material, engineering change tracking, supporting documentation, files, etc.

            Some of the files were 3D model files and the software we used included a Java-based 3D viewer. I used to think about creating a more lightweight, web based version of this kind of software for smaller design/manufacturing scenarios. The software we used ran into the five and six digits for cost, not cheap, an cost prohibitive for smaller situations.

            In the web based scenario, a browser based solution of course would be an almost must have for 3D viewing. But also having a lightweight external viewer would be cool too. I took a look at the Gnome Exhibit GitHub page and see it is pretty much just a Python GTK4 wrapper around an already existing and established minimalist 3D viewer/library named F3D written in C++. Most of the heavy lifting has been done already. Blender in this kind of use case is too much and not sure if it supports all of the file formats that would be required. For this interested in the underlying viewer/library:

            Fast and minimalist 3D viewer. Contribute to f3d-app/f3d development by creating an account on GitHub.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by uid313 View Post
              Cool!
              They're also making a new video player called Showtime which is good that they do that since Totem is still using GTK 3 so it needs to be upgraded to GTK 4 or replaced with a new one. These days I use Celluloid though which is really good because it is based on mpv (but with a GTK 4 frontend) so there is no freezing of frames and such.
              I used to use VLC a lot, but now mostly MPV. When watching something with friends, they tend to get impressed when I navigate to a video file in a terminal and launch via "mpv <file-name>" and there it is!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by OneTimeShot View Post
                I'm not sure that Gnome should develop their own applications. We have a 3d package called Blender to view 3d models. Similarly we have VLC for media playback. Gimp for photo editing.

                They need to work on their core offering to keep up with Windows and Mac. The desktop, software installation GUI, settings and file manager. Maybe they can recommend things to install, but ultimately you don't know if I want a CD player, word processor, or a terminal app...
                But these dare to ignore Gnome HIG, i.e., to limit functionality to the brink of uselessness, waste as much window space as possible and cram everything into hamburger menu dangerously few pixels from the close button. Funnily enough there is HIG-enabled CAD which does something, Dune3D (mostly a derivative of a stellar SolveSpace) -- Design apparently is just a failed smartphone/web app.

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                • #9
                  Love all the political nonsense in the blog post too. Free software has nothing to do with LGBT pride, why do they insist on shoehorning it in?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jonkoops View Post
                    One thing I'd really like to see is that GNOME apps start merging into each other. There is no need to have 5 different video player or terminal apps with partial features and level of support, we need a bit less choice and more solid and fleshed out options that are actually useful for the majority of users.
                    There aren't 5 different video players or terminals, GNOME only allows one core app for each function. All except one of the new apps are brand new codebases written from the ground up because the previous app was unmaintained and/or had an ancient codebase that was deemed too difficult to work with.

                    GNOME 47:
                    Totem (unmaintained since 2023, too difficult to port to GTK 4 due to dependencies on Clutter) -> Showtime
                    Evince (maintained and GTK 4 port was underway, but some devs decided to fork and rewrite it in Rust) -> Papers
                    Decibels - new app created only because GNOME Music's developers never added the ability for it to open a file directly from the file manager. It also doesn't have a volume control, and some devs actually tried to argue volume controls don't belong in music players. Absolutely asinine, but what else can you expect from GNOME?

                    GNOME 45:
                    EOG (unmaintained) -> Loupe
                    Cheese (unmaintained) -> Snapshot

                    GNOME 42:
                    Terminal (maintained, but not ported to GTK 4 fast enough) -> Console
                    Gedit (unmaintained since 2017) -> Text Editor
                    Last edited by mxan; 08 June 2024, 10:45 AM.

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