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KDE Landed Many Last Minute Features Ahead Of The Plasma 6.1 Beta

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Jaxad0127 View Post

    How much software have you worked on? Too much X is not a rare problem due to hard constraints you have no control over. In this case, it was an issue with Wayland maximum message size.
    Maybe I'm too much of a perfectionist due to my OCD, but to me, this kind of bug is unacceptable and it makes me not want to use the software that suffers from such bugs (btw, Gnome is also not immune from them, although they seem to be more rare on Gnome's side).

    The reason such bugs really fruatrate me, is because while Windows may have its own share of bugs (usually due to Microsoft breaking something with its Windows updates), when it comes to everything graphics related, let's face it, Windows is MUCH more robust.

    On Windows, have you ever heard about cases like single app crashing your entire desktop session, or crashing it simply by moving your mouse cursor "in a certain way" or doing something too quickly, or the fact that simply power cycling your monitor causes a desktop session crash (or some app crash specifically on Gnome Wayland)?
    I haven't and all the stuff I listed above I personally experienced on Linux and not on Windows. Oh, and I certainly haven't heard or experienced instability on Windows simply due to having too much Windows open.

    These occasional instabilities of anything graphics / desktop related is something I felt since I began using Linux in 2014 and it just makes me sad that it still suffers from them, while Windows doesn't, at least since the intriduction of the WDDM graphics infrastructure in Windows Vista. And like someone mentioned here, it's great that kwin Wayland has the compositor handoff feature, but to me it just sounds like a workaround to the fundamental compositor crashing problem, which shouldn't happen in the first place.

    But who am I kidding? I'm just an ungrateful freeloader who whines on Phoronix forums that software that is being given to me for free, often by volunteer developers, can't match Windows, developed by by a multi billion dollar corporation, in graphics stability. I also apparently have to know that some instabillities are caused by a mismatch in behavior between the DE and Wayland itself...
    Last edited by user1; 25 May 2024, 03:50 PM.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by xAlt7x View Post

      'Compositor Handoff' feature restores QT applications after kwin_wayland restart.
      Only Qt applications?
      This is a good opportunity to use robustness on GL apps...

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      • #13
        Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
        I hope they continue revamping the Power Settings page a little further. It doesn't actually say what any of the power profiles actually do. No tooltips. Nothing. Just Balanced, Performance, and Power Save. Do they change governors? Do they tweak when things turn on and off? Will they change keyboard or monitor brightness. Fuck if I know. It doesn't say. Even the blog post going into the new Energy Settings menu doesn't say want they do, just that they're there.

        Also, I have tooltips enabled. Where did all the tooltips go? The only ones in the start menu are on the header bar. The System Settings are the same way where tooltips only exist in the header bar and not on the settings that you'd like more information about what you're about to change.

        I remember them talking about cutting back on tooltips a year or so ago, but it really, really sucks when you come to options like Power Profiles where there's nothing in the System Settings that says what does what nor are we given a basic tooltip either because, fuck me, they finally cut them back and I'm just now noticing after a fresh install as I'm digging through the settings menus with nondescript options to set things up.
        They have not removed them all, only those that do not require explanation because they are trivial or those where the explanation would become too technical and complex.
        What is there to explain in the energy profiles? They are very clear from my point of view, if you then want to know what they do technically, I don't think it can be grouped into a small popup.​

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        • #14
          Originally posted by user1 View Post

          Maybe I'm too much of a perfectionist due to my OCD, but to me, this kind of bug is unacceptable and it makes me not want to use the software that suffers from such bugs (btw, Gnome is also not immune from them, although they seem to be more rare on Gnome's side).

          The reason such bugs really fruatrate me, is because while Windows may have its own share of bugs (usually due to Microsoft breaking something with its Windows updates), when it comes to everything graphics related, let's face it, Windows is MUCH more robust.

          On Windows, have you ever heard about cases like single app crashing your entire desktop session, or crashing it simply by moving your mouse cursor "in a certain way" or doing something too quickly, or the fact that simply power cycling your monitor causes a desktop session crash (or some app crash specifically on Gnome Wayland)?
          I haven't and all the stuff I listed above I personally experienced on Linux and not on Windows. Oh, and I certainly haven't heard or experienced instability on Windows simply due to having too much Windows open.

          These occasional instabilities of anything graphics / desktop related is something I felt since I began using Linux in 2014 and it just makes me sad that it still suffers from them, while Windows doesn't, at least since the intriduction of the WDDM graphics infrastructure in Windows Vista. And like someone mentioned here, it's great that kwin Wayland has the compositor handoff feature, but to me it just sounds like a workaround to the fundamental compositor crashing problem, which shouldn't happen in the first place.

          But who am I kidding? I'm just an ungrateful freeloader who whines on Phoronix forums that software that is being given to me for free, often by volunteer developers, can't match Windows, developed by by a multi billion dollar corporation, in graphics stability. I also apparently have to know that some instabillities are caused by a mismatch in behavior between the DE and Wayland itself...
          99% of PCs are sold with Windows, the manufacturer that sells it tests it on that specific machine, solving most of the most obvious bugs, Linux distributions must work on any hardware, but it is impossible for anyone to test it on all new hardware or old, that's a big difference.
          Another difference is that not many people test the beta versions, without much testing, most bugs are discovered on the stable version.​

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          • #15
            Originally posted by user1 View Post
            On Windows, have you ever heard about cases like single app crashing your entire desktop session, or crashing it simply by moving your mouse cursor "in a certain way" or doing something too quickly, or the fact that simply power cycling your monitor causes a desktop session crash (or some app crash specifically on Gnome Wayland)?
            I haven't and all the stuff I listed above I personally experienced on Linux and not on Windows. Oh, and I certainly haven't heard or experienced instability on Windows simply due to having too much Windows open.
            Yes, I have.
            - VIA drivers on Windows 7 don't like 32-bit vertex indices on Direct3D 9. Attempting to use them will crash the entire system.
            - I attempted to use Movie Maker on an old computer with ATI graphics. Upon stopping video, the program hangs and after a minute the blue jumpscare appears.
            - A decade ago, I tried to open multiple Explorer windows out of curiosity. After opening 30 windows, the next one displayed improperly and the desktop became unstable.
            - Again, a decade ago I tried out Nintendulator. After a while, Winlogon died all of a sudden and I was taken back to the login screen.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by woddy View Post

              They have not removed them all, only those that do not require explanation because they are trivial or those where the explanation would become too technical and complex.
              What is there to explain in the energy profiles? They are very clear from my point of view, if you then want to know what they do technically, I don't think it can be grouped into a small popup.​
              They've removed a lot of them. Enough of them that tooltips are mostly pointless on KDE. I can say the same thing about tooltips on Windows. There's a clear divide in tooltips between legacy elements that have them and new elements that don't have them, both KDE and Windows. It sucks, tooltips can be very helpful.

              There's everything to explain on the energy profiles page. Does it change governors? Set frequency limits? Change brightness? Change timeouts? Turn USB ports on or off? Unmount idle disks? It doesn't say what anything actually does. I can assume what everything does based on their names, but I also know that different BIOS/UEFI implementations, CPUs, monitors, LED lighting, etc don't allow the user to change any of that. Some things are on or off and high or low. It'd be nice to know what they're doing and if the system supports what's happening. I also know that Performance, Balanced, and Power Save do different things depending on the OS and software installed and that I shouldn't be making KDE assumptions based on GNOME or Windows. Not saying what any of them do anywhere is bad design, period.

              Governor: AMD P-State Performance
              Max Frequency: 5.4Ghz
              Min Frequency: 400mhz
              Screen Brightness: 100%
              LED Lighting Brightness: 100%
              Standby: Off
              Hibernation: Off
              Monitor Timeout: 30 Mins
              Front USB Panel: On
              Audio Volume: Muted

              That's the kind of information that a side panel or tooltip should be providing here.

              I've always thought that some tooltips should be expandable. You mouse over an option and it says the usual basic, almost ignorant tip like "Use the Performance Power Plan" but you'd be able to click the tip expansion icon and get the information above. Tip expansion could be used to hide tutorials and provide more information for things that aren't inherently intuitive.

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              • #17
                - Plasma now supports intercepting attempts to ring the system bell and to replace that with a nicer sound from the sound theme. Nate Graham remarked, "Our long national nightmare of jarring error beep sounds is now over!!!!"

                I love my pcspkr and its beeping, thus I hope that it remains an option.

                Comment


                • #18
                  Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

                  Only Qt applications?
                  Yep. David Edmundson opened merge request for GTK4 2 years ago but it hasn't landed yet.

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                    They've removed a lot of them. Enough of them that tooltips are mostly pointless on KDE. I can say the same thing about tooltips on Windows. There's a clear divide in tooltips between legacy elements that have them and new elements that don't have them, both KDE and Windows. It sucks, tooltips can be very helpful.

                    There's everything to explain on the energy profiles page. Does it change governors? Set frequency limits? Change brightness? Change timeouts? Turn USB ports on or off? Unmount idle disks? It doesn't say what anything actually does. I can assume what everything does based on their names, but I also know that different BIOS/UEFI implementations, CPUs, monitors, LED lighting, etc don't allow the user to change any of that. Some things are on or off and high or low. It'd be nice to know what they're doing and if the system supports what's happening. I also know that Performance, Balanced, and Power Save do different things depending on the OS and software installed and that I shouldn't be making KDE assumptions based on GNOME or Windows. Not saying what any of them do anywhere is bad design, period.

                    Governor: AMD P-State Performance
                    Max Frequency: 5.4Ghz
                    Min Frequency: 400mhz
                    Screen Brightness: 100%
                    LED Lighting Brightness: 100%
                    Standby: Off
                    Hibernation: Off
                    Monitor Timeout: 30 Mins
                    Front USB Panel: On
                    Audio Volume: Muted

                    That's the kind of information that a side panel or tooltip should be providing here.

                    I've always thought that some tooltips should be expandable. You mouse over an option and it says the usual basic, almost ignorant tip like "Use the Performance Power Plan" but you'd be able to click the tip expansion icon and get the information above. Tip expansion could be used to hide tutorials and provide more information for things that aren't inherently intuitive.
                    I imagine this information in a tooltips is difficult to maintain if it is detailed, because it requires translation into all languages. Maybe it would be enough to include these things in "help" if they are not already there now.

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                    • #20
                      OK. I'm switching the branch to unstable!

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