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Firefox 126 Available - Adds "Linux" To The Android User Agent String

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  • #31
    Originally posted by avis View Post
    As for being a Linux distro, show me glibc or at least musl in Android. Wait, there's none?
    Glibc packages for termux. Contribute to termux-pacman/glibc-packages development by creating an account on GitHub.

    What about systemd or upstart? Oops, none.
    I care about neither, android has it's own init system that works fine, you could add your own service manager to it if you wanted to, but that's stupid
    What about xorg/wayland? Oops, nothing.
    I have had both working fine, both within android's gui system https://github.com/termux/termux-x11, https://github.com/termux/termux-packages/pull/19587 and outside it, x11 running within the android environment, and wayland running within chroot, (mainly because I didn't want to be bothered setting up a buildroot at the time)
    Maybe you can run a run of the mill Linux distro on your smartphone? Oops, it won't even start, oh, you can't even install it given a peculiar partitioning scheme.
    Irrelevant but with minimal modding possible
    Version 6.1 you said? Can you compile linux-6.1.tar.xz without heavily patching it instead your Android's own kernel? Oh, wait, you can't.
    Yes, Android can work on vanilla linux kernel, this is how waydroid works in the first place, something commonly used by linux folk.
    A Linux distro, my a$$. You could be a great comedian.
    I do agree that considering it a "linux distro" feels wrong since it's contrary to what people do expect, but from the points made, vanilla android/aosp can be made to be a lot like a linux distro in those regards.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by avis View Post

      Excellent excuses.

      As for being a Linux distro, show me glibc or at least musl in Android. Wait, there's none?

      What about systemd or upstart? Oops, none.

      What about xorg/wayland? Oops, nothing.

      Maybe you can run a run of the mill Linux distro on your smartphone? Oops, it won't even start, oh, you can't even install it given a peculiar partitioning scheme.

      Version 6.1 you said? Can you compile linux-6.1.tar.xz without heavily patching it instead your Android's own kernel? Oh, wait, you can't.

      A Linux distro, my a$$. You could be a great comedian.
      So, you can conclude that FreeBSD is Linux. It meets all of the criteria you have. You could be a great comedian.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by avis View Post
        As for being a Linux distro, show me glibc or at least musl in Android. Wait, there's none?
        Bionic is the official libc for Android. Remember, one of the strengths of Linux is the ability to mix and match components.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Jaxad0127 View Post

          Bionic is the official libc for Android. Remember, one of the strengths of Linux is the ability to mix and match components.

          https://android.googlesource.com/platform/bionic/
          Great, it doesn't make Android (a) Linux (distro).

          I really hoped Google would drop the Linux kernel for Zircon, sadly their beancounters ran some spreadsheets and concluded that sticking to Linux would be more cost effective and buried the entire thing.

          Zircon would have made supporting Android devices a ton more cheaper and foolproof, with guaranteed updates for a decade if not longer since zircon offers stable API/ABI, both of which don't exist in Linux.

          Devoted Linux fans however couldn't care less about all the ewaste existing as a result of the impeccable Linux kernel development model.

          And strangely and funnily enterprise where all the money is chooses not the mainline kernel but something which offers stable API/ABI and at least a decade of support which is of course RHEL and its endless forks/derivatives.

          And Android which follows the same unspoken rule.

          Android is Linux. LMAO. You really need to eschew logic, common sense and basic knowledge to claim that.
          Last edited by avis; 15 May 2024, 10:22 AM.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by avis View Post

            Great, it doesn't make Android (a) Linux (distro).

            I really hoped Google would drop the Linux kernel for Zircon, sadly their beancounters ran some spreadsheets and concluded that sticking to Linux would be more cost effective and buried the entire thing.

            Zircon would have made supporting Android devices a ton more cheaper and foolproof, with guaranteed updates for a decade if not longer since zircon offers stable API/ABI, both of which don't exist in Linux.
            Send a message, maybe they would care to read. Or, you can apply for a job there to cure all their Android problems. I encourage you to do.

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            • #36
              I'll start to use it immediately when they add "text reflow on zoom"

              currently opera is the only browser supporting this feature.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by andyprough View Post

                You're talking about an imaginary OS that does not exist. In what ways are Guix and Nix and Alpine and Void musl similar to Tiny Core Linux and to Obarun and to Slackware? Other than a somewhat similar kernel in some cases? And that's not always even true - Debian GNU/Linux is a lot more like Debian Hurd than it is like Dragora. The value of the purists is to force people like you to define your terms so that you aren't just speaking gibberish, and so that you aren't giving advice as generally useful that might actually work on one distro while utterly demolishing another distro.
                Generally, the reason Android is considered "not Linux" is because it's "a Java/Kotlin + Dalvik" platform, not "a C + POSIX platform" and the presence of the Linux kernel is a mere implementation detail as far as what application developers are supposed to focus on.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by ssokolow View Post
                  Generally, the reason Android is considered "not Linux" is because it's "a Java/Kotlin + Dalvik" platform, not "a C + POSIX platform" and the presence of the Linux kernel is a mere implementation detail as far as what application developers are supposed to focus on.
                  That's not really quite right however, sure this is the "general case" but I can compile any linux program statically with musl, and as long as it doesn't have weird hardcoded assumptions it will usually work fine when executed. I believe you can even have fully native binary gui applications for android now too, but this isn't something I have explored.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

                    That's not really quite right however, sure this is the "general case" but I can compile any linux program statically with musl, and as long as it doesn't have weird hardcoded assumptions it will usually work fine when executed. I believe you can even have fully native binary gui applications for android now too, but this isn't something I have explored.
                    But that's not the intended behaviour and, if Google had the will to, they could have switched kernels and continued calling it Android.

                    I think of it more like a more distantly related analogue to how macOS vs. iOS aren't the same thing but share the XNU kernel.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

                      But that's not the intended behaviour and, if Google had the will to, they could have switched kernels and continued calling it Android.

                      I think of it more like a more distantly related analogue to how macOS vs. iOS aren't the same thing but share the XNU kernel.
                      Why do we call Linux "Linux"? Because it uses Linux kernel, right? Not because it is POSIX compliant or it has GNU coreutils or comes with Glibc. The thing is ... Android uses Linux kernel too. To me, it is Linux too. I can add busybox and a console app, then start using it as I do on Fedora. Actually, I have been doing that since Gingerbread.

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