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GNOME Sees Progress On Variable Refresh Rate Setting, Adding Battery Charge Control

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  • #11
    For the battery I am using this great GNOME extension: https://github.com/maniacx/Battery-Health-Charging

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    • #12
      Originally posted by elatllat View Post
      Up to ~60Hz and down to what? 1Hz?

      I wonder if Jelle van der Waa owns a Tesla, or if any computer brands recommend the 80% limit.
      Yes, I have a ThinkPad, and it recommends the 75-80% range. My sister owns a Dell, and it recommends the 50-55% range, while my Samsung phone recommends 85%. That would be an excellent feature!

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      • #13
        I have been playing with Ubuntu 24.04 daily. The latest Ubuntu/Gnome desktop is very nice , a nice looking consistent look, very smooth/snappy interface. If you have never tried Gnome, give it a try. I think you will be impressed.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post
          1. the fact that the search doesn't take into account your recent apps. If I have 2 terminals installed and I search "term" and click on the 2nd one in the list. The next time I search "term" it's still the 2nd item in the list rather than defaulting to the front of the list.
          That's weird because I thought it did take recent apps into account. I bring up the calculator a lot so I'll usually launch it by type "calc" and just press enter to choose the first thing on the list and Calculator launches. But if I just using LibreOffice Calc and I do the same thing, then that will be the first in the list.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by phoronix View Post
            [...] Variable Refresh Rate.

            [...] Variable Rate Refresh (VRR).
            Dude, why do you always mix these. It's a "refresh rate" that is variable.

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            • #16
              My current setup is Fedora Workstation 39, so has Gnome as default. I also have installed a few Wayland-native window managers. The one extension I run in Gnome is "Dash to Panel". I used to have to run one that opened the desktop to the desktop, not the overview, but Dash to Panel has an option to do this built-in. I am open to other full desktop environment options, and keeping tabs on Cosmic, but Gnome is good enough for me for now.

              One added thought on its evolution, it started to really look nice when it went from 3.38 to 40. I assume this was related to GTK4 and libadwaita. I know there was some controversy about this, some functionality removed (ability to theme and/or related to SSD vs. CSD, if I recall), but from an ascetics point of view it was a big improvement. And although things like functionality and stability matter, looks also matter to me as well. I want the environment I work in to look nice. Not related to Linux of course, but when macOS went from 10.9 to 10.10, there was that same level of improvement in the looks department.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by ehansin View Post
                One added thought on its evolution, it started to really look nice when it went from 3.38 to 40. I assume this was related to GTK4 and libadwaita. I know there was some controversy about this, some functionality removed (ability to theme and/or related to SSD vs. CSD, if I recall), but from an ascetics point of view it was a big improvement. And although things like functionality and stability matter, looks also matter to me as well. I want the environment I work in to look nice. Not related to Linux of course, but when macOS went from 10.9 to 10.10, there was that same level of improvement in the looks department.
                I agree. I thought the Gnome 3.x desktop looked pretty bad and didn't really like using it until 40. But while I think 40 great, I think what I really liked about it is how it's visual hierarchy conveyed how it can be used.

                Gnome 3.x used to have the workspace switcher in a second dock on the right and both it and the dash would be atop a darkened version of the desktop background. To switch to one you just clicked one of them workspaces in the switcher. Gnome 40 zooms the workspace out to reveal the dash and a peak at another workspace, then going into applications view zooms out even further so you can see all the workspaces. What was once done by basically clicking something on a workspace bar turned into just clicking the actual workspace to travel to it. Since workspaces in the overview look visually more like a gallery, you're likely to assume that you can scroll through them, which you can. Once something is stored on more than one workspace then the workspace switcher shows up again at the top of the screen but it mimics the look and function of workspaces in the application view.

                So it managed to improve usability while getting itself out of the gaudy early smart phone look.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                  Some other interesting but separate work being carried out is by GNOME developer Jelle van der Waa for offering up battery charge controls. This is to make use of the exposed Linux kernel charge control start/end thresholds for helping to preserve battery health for laptops frequently plugged in 24/7.
                  This is really important, and much needed in the Linux world. Laptops have enough cpu horsepower to "pull the plug" so to speak even if you don't do it yourself so that your battery will have a much longer life.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Myownfriend View Post

                    That's weird because I thought it did take recent apps into account. I bring up the calculator a lot so I'll usually launch it by type "calc" and just press enter to choose the first thing on the list and Calculator launches. But if I just using LibreOffice Calc and I do the same thing, then that will be the first in the list.
                    I thought so too (it seems like basic functionality) but I installed Gnome recently to try it out again, and I had Cosmic-Term installed for testing and it always showed up first in the search results, even though I almost always selected Gnome Terminal. It’s like it was just sorting alphabetically.

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                    • #20
                      Sadly, depending on the type of the battery and what actually firmware does, this battery hack may be equally well beneficial, wasteful or harmful. Users shouldn't just be given magical "make it better" button when software cannot vouch for that.

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