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KDE Lands NVIDIA Hardware Cursor Support & Other Last Minute Plasma 6.0 Features

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  • #31
    About Nvidia haters. The hate comes from the missing in support linux, however, it's funny to observe as the hate comes from supporting linux too. 🤭

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

      I don't know about the USA, but here in the Netherlands, if you develop something in your spare time that the company you work for benefits from or is somehow related to said company, it's still considered employee work.
      Even if it's not considered employee work, often you need to get an approval from the company to work on your own on stuff that could be considered "competition" or otherwise related to what the company is doing. However, this isn't the first Nvidia employee that does open source work, so really no fuss.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by usta View Post
        If i'm not wrong only libsignon-glib is trying to install some files to /usr other than that none given similar error to me
        If you didn't figure it out yourself, update the libsignon-glib part in custom-qt6-libs-build-include and add the configure-flags line

        Code:
          
        module libsignon-glib
          # this one does depend on qt, it seems
          repository https://gitlab.com/accounts-sso/libsignon-glib.git
          qmake-options PREFIX=${kdedir}
          configure-flags -Dpy-overrides-dir=${kdedir}/lib/python3.11/site-packages/gi/overrides/
        end module​
        
        ​
        I didn't get the $APPDIR stuff till near the very end and I don't think that's the correct fix/location for those specific .desktop files.

        It'd had been so long since I set it up initially that I forgot about using ${kdedir} when one was one line up
        Last edited by skeevy420; 02 December 2023, 09:05 PM.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post
          AFAIK the only NVidia specific features that even work on Linux are CUDA and their encoder.
          My g-sync monitor doesn't work with AMD. I'm vendor locked-in now until I buy a new monitor, which I don't intend to do for quite a while.

          Another feature I can't get with AMD is the ability to run LTS kernels but still being able to update the GPU drivers. Unless I'm mistaken, with AMD the GPU driver is part of the kernel, not an external stand-alone driver? So if I want updated drivers, I need to run the latest kernel version, but I want to stick with LTS.

          I also dual-boot Windows for gaming, and nvidia works better for me there.

          In any event, for as long as I can run X11 on Linux, nvidia is fine. By the time X11 really bites the dust and it's not even practical to run it anymore, I'll consider upgrading. I am not going to throw perfectly fine working hardware to the trash. Money doesn't grow on trees. It's easy to say "switch to AMD" when you're not the one who'll pay the bill for a new, overpriced AMD GPU.
          Last edited by RealNC; 02 December 2023, 10:16 PM.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post

            AFAIK the only NVidia specific features that even work on Linux are CUDA and their encoder. Both are definitely useful for a variety of reasons, but the number of people who actually depend on those features at home has to be a fraction of 1% of people.
            A bit more. DLSS also works (both nativly and in proton nvapi), gsync, bunch of quadro specific features like mosaic also works on X server. Also from what I seen in tests with DXVK, there is more games refusing to work with AMD or Intel right, then with NVidia. Like almost never I saw benchmark here with Michael when game with Nvidia doesn't work, but plenty i seen with AMD.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by RealNC View Post

              My g-sync monitor doesn't work with AMD. I'm vendor locked-in now until I buy a new monitor, which I don't intend to do for quite a while.

              Another feature I can't get with AMD is the ability to run LTS kernels but still being able to update the GPU drivers. Unless I'm mistaken, with AMD the GPU driver is part of the kernel, not an external stand-alone driver? So if I want updated drivers, I need to run the latest kernel version, but I want to stick with LTS.

              I also dual-boot Windows for gaming, and nvidia works better for me there.

              In any event, for as long as I can run X11 on Linux, nvidia is fine. By the time X11 really bites the dust and it's not even practical to run it anymore, I'll consider upgrading. I am not going to throw perfectly fine working hardware to the trash. Money doesn't grow on trees. It's easy to say "switch to AMD" when you're not the one who'll pay the bill for a new, overpriced AMD GPU.
              You just exposed the reason linux kinda sucks. And why nvidias method of supporting linux isn't that bad (apart from being closed source). We need a microkernel that doesnt suck or linux need to embrace a middle solution more or amd needs to move their shite to mesa.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by cj.wijtmans View Post

                You just exposed the reason linux kinda sucks. And why nvidias method of supporting linux isn't that bad (apart from being closed source). We need a microkernel that doesnt suck or linux need to embrace a middle solution more or amd needs to move their shite to mesa.
                Well, if you take a step back and look at the bigger picture, the answer becomes apparent: Linux doesn't suck. It successfully underpins the backbone of the Internet, it carries most of the mobile phones in the world. What doesn't work so well is Linux desktop. And that's because, unlike server-oriented distros or Android, which are governed by a single body, the Linux desktop is still a wild-west, for various reasons.
                Considering that, Linux works surprisingly well on the desktop, imho. And I try to remember all that whenever I run into a papercut, instead of blaming <insert_company_you_dislike_here> for not fixing the ecosystem as a whole.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by cj.wijtmans View Post

                  You just exposed the reason linux kinda sucks. And why nvidias method of supporting linux isn't that bad (apart from being closed source). We need a microkernel that doesnt suck or linux need to embrace a middle solution more or amd needs to move their shite to mesa.
                  I was thinking about that in the Bcachefs article earlier. It gets a bug fix or performance enhancement and you have to upgrade your kernel, same thing happens with ZFS and you update the module. AMD/Intel and NVIDIA are the same. I have an AMD GPU and as much as I'd prefer to keep the kernel on LTS, I have to run Stable because of a single piece of hardware. The worst part is that AMD maintains an out of tree DKMS version in AMDGPU-Pro but it's only geared to work on Ubuntu, SUSE, and RHEL.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Hazel View Post
                    So you think _your_ commenta are valuable? I prefer to write less but at least make sense.

                    Sense dude, sense.
                    Another empty comment.

                    You're impeccable at that.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by cj.wijtmans View Post

                      You just exposed the reason linux kinda sucks. And why nvidias method of supporting linux isn't that bad (apart from being closed source). We need a microkernel that doesnt suck or linux need to embrace a middle solution more or amd needs to move their shite to mesa.
                      The only thing exposed here is your lack of understanding how any of this works. AMD drivers are already in mesa. This has nothing to do with the kernel architecture. Drivers are already modular. In many cases you could probably just backport amd driver fixes from later kernels to the LTS version or whatever you want to run and rebuild the module.

                      The issue is how the driver code is managed in the git repo. A linux microkernel would have the exact same problem.

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