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KDE Plasma 6.0 Is Enabling Wayland By Default, Initial Support For HDR-Capable Games

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  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

    So I actually remembered and, yep, HDR with MPV is working on KDE Plasma 6.0 Beta 1 (mine is from kdesrc-build workspace) with RADV on CachyOS with Linux 6.6.3. All I had to do was enable HDR in KDE in the system settings and run an HDR enabled video with MPV. I tested with the Samsung Wonderland demo video.

    Games in HDR, however, are a bit more hit and miss.

    At least you won't have to pin or rely on AMDVLK anymore.
    You sir, Are quite the man. Cheers, Ill be building plasma soon

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post
    it will sure be nice if the HDR stuff can work with mpv. It seems like the hdr stuff uses some kind of vulkan layer as a layer inbetween to add VK_EXT_hdr_metadata​. I think this is what mpv should need. Wondering if anyone running the preliminary HDR stuff could test it since I wont be able to for a bit. it really would be nice since im relying on a pinned amdvlk version atm
    So I actually remembered and, yep, HDR with MPV is working on KDE Plasma 6.0 Beta 1 (mine is from kdesrc-build workspace) with RADV on CachyOS with Linux 6.6.3. All I had to do was enable HDR in KDE in the system settings and run an HDR enabled video with MPV. I tested with the Samsung Wonderland demo video.

    Games in HDR, however, are a bit more hit and miss.

    At least you won't have to pin or rely on AMDVLK anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by avis View Post
    ngraham

    17 likes for my request here.

    You kinda underestimated hard the interest in it and that's only the registered Phoronix users who have opened this thread.
    Im really not sure how they gauge interest. KDE's bug tracker is complete and utter dogshit to the degree it actively pushes people away. and people frown upon +1 replying on issues trackers. So im not sure how we are supposed to make it clear when an issue is an actual issue.

    Take this issue for instance, https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=471637 this is something that has been constantly complained to me about by people I get to try linux, Im only one person, can only vote once, and im not going to bother people to make an account for this.

    Leave a comment:


  • avis
    replied
    ngraham

    17 likes for my request here.

    You kinda underestimated hard the interest in it and that's only the registered Phoronix users who have opened this thread.

    Leave a comment:


  • mrg666
    replied
    Originally posted by dpeterc View Post
    This advice is as useful as turning back time and doing backup on a crashed hard disk to restore the data.

    We do support of a Linux application, not of Linux itself. We do have TeamViewer and solve 99% of issues that way. If graphical session would be working on full disk, we could solve all the problems.
    Mostly we don't install Linux, we don't ship machines. We do Linux support only because some of our applications run on Linux.
    Keeping an open ssh port is contrary to security policies in many companies and blocked by firewalls.


    Have I been disrespectful to you? Did I call you names? Are you unable to express your opinion in a polite way?
    If that is the case, I can't continue this conversation.


    I will repeat once again, if disk is full, you can't login to KDE (the root cause might be SDDM or something else).
    When there's no free disk space on /var/lib/sddm, sddm neither starts properly nor quits with helpful log message. It leaves black screen with cursor instead. Steps to reproduce Log out Stop sddm (...
    There are "reverse ssh" and "ngrok" methods.. You can start with the following link
    SSH Without Port Forwarding. Easily SSH to your Office PC or a device in your LAN which is behind a firewall or a router from anywhere around the world instantly without port forwarding. Follow this tutorial to set up ngrok in less than a minute.


    If you can't login to KDE, then you do your job in other ways. Tell them to send an ssh request to your server and do reverse ssh, for example.

    BTW, it is not just KDE, you probably cannot login any other DE if SDDM is not working right, That is where how to tell the customer login via command console becomes useful.

    And, you are welcome, was this polite?

    Leave a comment:


  • dpeterc
    replied
    Originally posted by slalomsk8er View Post
    As @mrg666​ mentioned​, use a cmd remoting tool like SSH to connect in the background. In contrast to @Quackdoc​ I see no problem in having this enabled, if not directly exposed to the internet and with properly managed credentials - for example with SSH-certs.

    Use a script to attach network storage, RAM-disk or whatever is needed to get the problem fixed but above all prevention is better then fixing so have some spare space reserved and monitor the devices.

    Also a proven strategy is, having a person on site trained, we called them "super users", to be able to boot from a stick with something like UBCD on there. This way you know the technical skills and the tools at hand and can efficiently direct them over the phone. It should be quite quick to get a technical person up to speed on how to boot from a stick and granting you remote access.
    Thank you for your advice.
    SSH is mostly not practical solution, since we don't really control the networking infrastructure of the company, and SSH is often blocked. We only support our Linux application. And since we introduce Linux to the company, customer calls us in case of any problems.

    Actually we do use "superusers" to boot the Linux from DVD or USB key to repair the dual boot or broken graphics card setting.

    Leave a comment:


  • dpeterc
    replied
    Originally posted by mrg666 View Post
    You should have ssh access to that computer instead of handwaving and wasting time. Why do you even act like you are supporting a computer when there is no sshd (or another support service) in place on that computer?
    This advice is as useful as turning back time and doing backup on a crashed hard disk to restore the data.

    We do support of a Linux application, not of Linux itself. We do have TeamViewer and solve 99% of issues that way. If graphical session would be working on full disk, we could solve all the problems.
    Mostly we don't install Linux, we don't ship machines. We do Linux support only because some of our applications run on Linux.
    Keeping an open ssh port is contrary to security policies in many companies and blocked by firewalls.

    Originally posted by mrg666 View Post
    Then come here and state your frustration when the customer is more frustrated with you. It does not matter where customer is when you have ssh access.
    The problem is there since your brilliant admins sent out computers, or accepted supporting, without checking if the support services in place. Incompetent product, incompetent support, lose, lose, and wth, lose, lose, lose.
    Sheesh!
    Have I been disrespectful to you? Did I call you names? Are you unable to express your opinion in a polite way?
    If that is the case, I can't continue this conversation.

    Originally posted by mrg666 View Post
    And you are here, finding problems with KDE as if that is your problem?
    I will repeat once again, if disk is full, you can't login to KDE (the root cause might be SDDM or something else).
    When there's no free disk space on /var/lib/sddm, sddm neither starts properly nor quits with helpful log message. It leaves black screen with cursor instead. Steps to reproduce Log out Stop sddm (...

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by woddy View Post

    This is how software works today and not just open source software, just look at how many times it happens that Windows releases an update that breaks something.
    Unfortunately, no one is able to test Linux on hundreds of thousands of hardware and software configurations.
    There is an alpha phase, a beta testing phase and then the release... as long as few people don't test the beta versions, you can't complain...​
    while true, the issue on the otherhand is that IMO it seems like no one is making software that they want to run on thousands of different configurations

    Leave a comment:


  • woddy
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

    I mean, I feel like linux in general is one big never ending beta test
    This is how software works today and not just open source software, just look at how many times it happens that Windows releases an update that breaks something.
    Unfortunately, no one is able to test Linux on hundreds of thousands of hardware and software configurations.
    There is an alpha phase, a beta testing phase and then the release... as long as few people don't test the beta versions, you can't complain...​

    Leave a comment:


  • slalomsk8er
    replied
    Originally posted by dpeterc View Post
    So how do you, the competent support person, solve this problem?
    I will be glad to try your solution next time in such situation.
    As @mrg666​ mentioned​, use a cmd remoting tool like SSH to connect in the background. In contrast to @Quackdoc​ I see no problem in having this enabled, if not directly exposed to the internet and with properly managed credentials - for example with SSH-certs.

    Use a script to attach network storage, RAM-disk or whatever is needed to get the problem fixed but above all prevention is better then fixing so have some spare space reserved and monitor the devices.

    Also a proven strategy is, having a person on site trained, we called them "super users", to be able to boot from a stick with something like UBCD on there. This way you know the technical skills and the tools at hand and can efficiently direct them over the phone. It should be quite quick to get a technical person up to speed on how to boot from a stick and granting you remote access.

    Leave a comment:

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