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Git 2.37 Released With Sparse Index Feature Now Ready For Widespread Use

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  • Git 2.37 Released With Sparse Index Feature Now Ready For Widespread Use

    Phoronix: Git 2.37 Released With Sparse Index Feature Now Ready For Widespread Use

    Git 2.37 is out today as the latest feature update to this widely-used, distributed revision control system...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...-2.37-Released

  • #2
    I am sure all these nerd features are cool, but is anything being done to improve the usability and user experience of Git?
    It is inconsistent, confusing, frustrating, weird, awkward and not user friendly.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
      I am sure all these nerd features are cool, but is anything being done to improve the usability and user experience of Git?
      It is inconsistent, confusing, frustrating, weird, awkward and not user friendly.
      But with all these shortcomings, ironically it's the best DCVS out there 🤣

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      • #4
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
        I am sure all these nerd features are cool, but is anything being done to improve the usability and user experience of Git?
        It is inconsistent, confusing, frustrating, weird, awkward and not user friendly.
        You always complain about how much of an arcane concept git is to you.

        Have you considered that git, or just programming in general, is just not for you?

        It's ok, some people can't understand control flow and think programming should be dumbed down to their level, perhaps with graphical building blocks, so it looks like LEGO. So you're not even close to be as bad.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by timofonic View Post

          But with all these shortcomings, ironically it's the best DCVS out there 🤣
          Yes, it probably is the best from a technical point of view, but from a end-user point-of-view Microsoft Team Foundation Version Control (TFVC) is likely easier to use, I am not saying TFVC is any good though, it sucks, it is proprietary, it is Windows-only, it is not central not distributed, forking is expensive as it clones the whole repository.

          Git is hugely popular, and maybe it is technically good, but it might be the most user unfriendly SCM system out there.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Weasel View Post
            You always complain about how much of an arcane concept git is to you.

            Have you considered that git, or just programming in general, is just not for you?

            It's ok, some people can't understand control flow and think programming should be dumbed down to their level, perhaps with graphical building blocks, so it looks like LEGO. So you're not even close to be as bad.
            I love programming and work professionally as a developer. Git is not user-friendly though. Other people agree, which is why there have been attempts to create other SCM like Fossil and Pijul.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Weasel View Post
              You always complain about how much of an arcane concept git is to you.

              Have you considered that git, or just programming in general, is just not for you?

              It's ok, some people can't understand control flow and think programming should be dumbed down to their level, perhaps with graphical building blocks, so it looks like LEGO. So you're not even close to be as bad.
              Or maybe it's you who has only ever used git clone, add, commit, push and maybe branch or merge. Once you dig a bit deeper, you will quickly see things getting inconsistent and arcane, like options for doing the same thing having different names for some subcommands, incomplete documentation, and inconsistent output formats. Oh, and I forgot the guessing whether a command-line argument is a tree (complete with associated syntax nightmares) or a file name which you can already see in the basics.

              Don't get me wrong, I do think the backend is rather good, but the interface leaves a lot to be desired.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                I am sure all these nerd features are cool, but is anything being done to improve the usability and user experience of Git?
                It is inconsistent, confusing, frustrating, weird, awkward and not user friendly.
                You sound smart when you make these allegations against a fledging project. Less so against an established powerhouse like Git. Git singlehandedly put svn and other VCSes to greener pastures.
                Sure, it has its rough edges, but nowhere near as bad as you make it sound.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bug77 View Post

                  You sound smart when you make these allegations against a fledging project. Less so against an established powerhouse like Git. Git singlehandedly put svn and other VCSes to greener pastures.
                  Sure, it has its rough edges, but nowhere near as bad as you make it sound.
                  You are going a bit too far. Yes, Git is very popular but there are certainly other VCSes that continue to have fairly wide use. This includes SVN, Mercurial and even Perforce. OP tends to be very repetitive by posting this same criticism on every project on every single post with a nugget of validity to it. Yes, git UI has some warts. People use it just fine anyway because of the other benefits. If anyone cares so much, they should submit PRs. They accept changes just fine as long as backward compatibility is preserved.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RahulSundaram View Post

                    You are going a bit too far. Yes, Git is very popular but there are certainly other VCSes that continue to have fairly wide use. This includes SVN, Mercurial and even Perforce. OP tends to be very repetitive by posting this same criticism on every project on every single post with a nugget of validity to it. Yes, git UI has some warts. People use it just fine anyway because of the other benefits. If anyone cares so much, they should submit PRs. They accept changes just fine as long as backward compatibility is preserved.
                    Yes, other VCSes are still around, but really, until Git, they didn't even track files properly (e.g. rename a file in svn, watch your commit history disappear). And I've almost forgot about the days I had to track down which team member locked the svn file I needed to check in. They're still around, but they're now relegated to the niches they deserve.

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