Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PulseAudio 16.0 Released With A Variety Of Improvements

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • microcode
    replied
    Originally posted by binarybanana View Post

    If you mean why I won't use it it's because I don't like it. if you meae why it's been designed that way it's because it was written by RedHat.



    Oh, that's interesting! Does that mean it won't respect configuration in .asoundrc, either? But even then, the kernel part is called ALSA, too. I worded that wrong in my previous post.
    Well, there are a couple of ways it is done. Most people who use ALSA are using alsa-lib/libasound so it can be intercepted with LD_PRELOAD or substituted in place.

    If they're using the system call interface directly, I'm not sure, but I think there are still ways to work with that.
    Last edited by microcode; 03 June 2022, 11:54 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • royce
    replied
    Originally posted by binarybanana View Post
    If you mean why I won't use it it's because I don't like it.
    I'm not sure you're going to have a choice - I would imagine Pulseaudio will eventually be abandoned once distro usage plummets. And same goes for Jack. Most desktop software will only ever talk to Pulseaudio to emit sound.

    Leave a comment:


  • binarybanana
    replied
    Originally posted by royce View Post
    Why so?
    If you mean why I won't use it it's because I don't like it. if you meae why it's been designed that way it's because it was written by RedHat.

    Originally posted by microcode View Post

    Well, PipeWire has drop-in alsa libraries like it does with pulse and jack; probably the same would work with sndio (I don't know of any program that uses sndio without the userland library). PipeWire seems pretty similar to sndio, semantically.
    Oh, that's interesting! Does that mean it won't respect configuration in .asoundrc, either? But even then, the kernel part is called ALSA, too. I worded that wrong in my previous post.

    Leave a comment:


  • microcode
    replied
    Originally posted by binarybanana View Post
    alsa is lower layer than PA/PW. It's an API that talks directly to the kernel (through a smallish userland library). They're not at all equal.
    Well, PipeWire has drop-in alsa libraries like it does with pulse and jack; probably the same would work with sndio (I don't know of any program that uses sndio without the userland library). PipeWire seems pretty similar to sndio, semantically.

    Leave a comment:


  • royce
    replied
    Originally posted by binarybanana View Post
    PW requires to itself and everything else to be started within a dbus session. As long as that is true I can't/refuse to use it .
    Why so?

    Leave a comment:


  • binarybanana
    replied
    Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
    sndio used in OpenBSD and FreeBSD is arguarably simpler than alsa or pulseaudio or pipewire. The simple fact that Linux has 3 sound systems in the same time period that the two biggest *BSDs has had one is telling. Admittedly I've never used pipewire yet but I know sndio is better than pulseaudio.
    alsa is lower layer than PA/PW. It's an API that talks directly to the kernel (through a smallish userland library). They're not at all equal.

    Originally posted by microcode View Post

    Why would it be similar to that? PipeWire is (for nearly everyone) a fully compatible drop-in replacement for PulseAudio and JACK2.
    PW requires to itself and everything else to be started within a dbus session. As long as that is true I can't/refuse to use it .


    Leave a comment:


  • Slartifartblast
    replied
    Originally posted by microcode View Post
    I wonder how long PulseAudio will be maintained, it's been replaced by default on my machines with PipeWire for a while now.
    Typical Linux world, just as something finally matures becoming relatively bug free and stable it's a case of right here's something new and shiny that isn't going to help you that much and is full of new bug ridden code. I just hope PulseAudio hangs around long enough before I have to make the transition to Pulse woes II (AKA PipeWire).

    Sigh.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by microcode View Post

    Why would it be similar to that? PipeWire is (for nearly everyone) a fully compatible drop-in replacement for PulseAudio and JACK2.
    Why didn't you understand what “lol” at the end of my post meant? It was a joke.

    Leave a comment:


  • royce
    replied
    Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
    The simple fact that Linux has 3 sound systems in the same time period that the two biggest *BSDs has had one is telling.
    Desktop BSD is not exactly popular compared to Linux, and things can move fast in the Linux world, hence why we have duplication like this. The needs of that particular moment that had to be met ASAP whose solutions didn't age well.

    Leave a comment:


  • royce
    replied
    Originally posted by microcode View Post
    I wonder how long PulseAudio will be maintained, it's been replaced by default on my machines with PipeWire for a while now.
    I'm not 100% certain but I seem to recall Fedora switched to pipewire-pulse some time ago. With Ubuntu doing the same from its next release that's basically the nail in the coffin for it. I don't believe Pulseaudio 16+ is going to see any use on any desktop distro that matters.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X