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System76 Releases v1.1 Scheduler For Optimizing Linux Desktop/Laptop Responsiveness

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  • mmstick
    replied
    Originally posted by Etherman View Post

    Does it do ionice too? I like running stuff like system updates at idle priority.
    Not currently, but I'll implement the feature in the next update to optionally define an I/O priority.

    Leave a comment:


  • mdedetrich
    replied
    Originally posted by Alexmitter View Post
    If System76 is doing something, I am always worried.
    Cool story bro

    Leave a comment:


  • Linuxxx
    replied
    Originally posted by nielsvl95 View Post

    Since today, we got an update to 5.17.5. And those kernels are System76 specific. This is the complete name of the kernel:
    5.17.5-76051705-generic
    What is System76-specific about those kernels exactly?

    In fact, the naming convention sounds suspiciously similar to Ubuntu's mainline kernel PPA:

    https://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v5.17.5/

    You sure System76 isn't simply copying their kernel from there, appending the number 76 & calling it a day?

    Leave a comment:


  • Etherman
    replied
    Originally posted by mmstick View Post

    That is correct. It is a Dbus service which has three modes: Auto, Battery, Responsive. When in Auto mode, it watches UPower for battery status notifications and automatically switches between responsive and battery profiles based on being plugged into AC or on battery. These two profies tweak the CFS scheduler latencies and preempt type. Laptops on battery will switch to kernel defaults, while desktops and laptops on AC will use the low latency tweaks.

    It also polls for processes periodically and automatically assigns priorities to managed processes based on rules defined in configuration files. The window manager can integrate with the service to provide foreground process PIDs for automatic priority adjustments to unmanaged processes. The foreground process and all of its subprocesses will get a designated foreground priority, and all other unmanaged processes get a background priority assignment.



    Be afraid. Be very afraid.



    First time I've heard of it. Seems to work in a completely different way.



    5.17 at the time of this post.
    Does it do ionice too? I like running stuff like system updates at idle priority.

    Leave a comment:


  • mmstick
    replied
    I will say that Pop uses mainline kernels with minimal patching. The intent is to keep in sync with mainline updates, regression testing permitting.

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  • stormcrow
    replied
    Originally posted by bitterseeds View Post

    It's 5.16 and maybe they don't use the exact build that Ubuntu does? Based on is never exact ... we all know this.
    Or should anyway. Even Linus bemoans that many of the mainstream distributions alter their kernels from his vanilla tree. Wouldn't normally be a problem, but it seems a lot of people don't realize this and post bugs with their distribution's kernels expecting them to be the same as Linus' tree.

    Leave a comment:


  • mmstick
    replied
    I think more of 'system67-scheduler' as the user-space intelligence agency for the linux-kernel. It informs the scheduler on changing circumstances as the OS is being used.

    At least that is what I understand it does. If any of this is wrong, please do correct me.
    That is correct. It is a Dbus service which has three modes: Auto, Battery, Responsive. When in Auto mode, it watches UPower for battery status notifications and automatically switches between responsive and battery profiles based on being plugged into AC or on battery. These two profies tweak the CFS scheduler latencies and preempt type. Laptops on battery will switch to kernel defaults, while desktops and laptops on AC will use the low latency tweaks.

    It also polls for processes periodically and automatically assigns priorities to managed processes based on rules defined in configuration files. The window manager can integrate with the service to provide foreground process PIDs for automatic priority adjustments to unmanaged processes. The foreground process and all of its subprocesses will get a designated foreground priority, and all other unmanaged processes get a background priority assignment.

    If System76 is doing something, I am always worried.
    Be afraid. Be very afraid.

    I am using the TT-scheduler on my Ubuntu system. It is great for creating a very responsive system that has great performance too. To me it looks like Pop-OS borrowed heavily from that scheduler.
    First time I've heard of it. Seems to work in a completely different way.

    I don't know which kernel version Pop!-OS
    5.17 at the time of this post.

    Leave a comment:


  • LuukD
    replied
    I like that the project recognizes that the OS in use is not static and as such the OS scheduler might want to adapt - but I find the name 'scheduler' a bit confusing.
    For a minute I thought System 76 had written a kernel task scheduler in Rust (which currently isn't really possible). However, this is not a CFS or Deadline replacement. System 76 just flipped the real-time preempt behavior in the kernel configuration and wrote a service to help the kernel to know what is going on while in use. To more dynamically assess what can wait a tick or two and what cannot.
    I think more of 'system67-scheduler' as the user-space intelligence agency for the linux-kernel. It informs the scheduler on changing circumstances as the OS is being used.

    At least that is what I understand it does. If any of this is wrong, please do correct me.

    Leave a comment:


  • CochainComplex
    replied
    Originally posted by FPScholten View Post
    I am using the TT-scheduler on my Ubuntu system. It is great for creating a very responsive system that has great performance too. To me it looks like Pop-OS borrowed heavily from that scheduler.
    https://github.com/hamadmarri/TT-CPU-Scheduler
    its a great one - I have been using it when 5.15. was the most recent kernel. but since xanmod only patches the LTS kernel not the most recent anymore I have dropped it. Hopefully they will change their mind and release a current stable TT-patched kernel again.
    Last edited by CochainComplex; 05 May 2022, 05:21 AM.

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  • nielsvl95
    replied
    Originally posted by bitterseeds View Post

    It's 5.16 and maybe they don't use the exact build that Ubuntu does? Based on is never exact ... we all know this.
    Since today, we got an update to 5.17.5. And those kernels are System76 specific. This is the complete name of the kernel:
    5.17.5-76051705-generic

    Leave a comment:

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