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  • #31
    Originally posted by Romaker View Post

    Well, the Writer still has issues with figures inside both doc and docx. Some scientific paper docx templates, e.g., RSC, could not be opened with Writer at all. Complex formatting is not the strongest side of all LO equvalents. I use both LO 7.2 and Office 365.
    Office suites should not be used for scientific papers anyway. Prefer LaTeX.

    I personally use LaTeX for anything I want to be well formatted (notably, scientific papers) and LO just to write mostly unformatted text (I may actually just use a text editor in most cases, which I do for technical notes I want to be readable without a GUI).

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by OneTimeShot View Post
      It's implying that 30000 is less "legal" than 1 user
      Nobody ever said that. And I think reading Wikipedia is not enough to understand the background. I have seen posts by big companies with many, many installations (and much more money by the way!) who did NOT have the technical stuff to care for their Office installation themselves, AND were NOT willing to establish a proper support contract either. This is the sort of people who should be warned with the simple hint "Personal edition". Of course, you can run thousands of installations without paying a single dollar. If you plan to do it this way, you should be able to care for your installation. If you don't want to employ the necessary stuff, you are better off with a support contract which still saves you much money compared to proprietary software.
      Last edited by Go_Vulkan; 28 December 2021, 09:40 AM.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by ALRBP View Post

        Office suites should not be used for scientific papers anyway.
        Most publishers disagree with that bold statement...

        Comment


        • #34
          In the deb version of LO if you need to add some extra fonts (ms ttf), you create a directory .fonts and place the font files there. In the snap era this does not work anymore, as one needs to copy the fonts inside the folder with the LO snap package.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Romaker View Post
            Most publishers disagree with that bold statement...
            But they are not the ones that actually have to write them and they simply don't care that LaTeX undeniably creates a much more professional result by default than any Office Suite ever will. And when you ask the people that actually write the papers they'll all recommend LaTeX. So nothing bold about that statement, it's just a simple fact

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by Romaker View Post
              In the deb version of LO if you need to add some extra fonts (ms ttf), you create a directory .fonts and place the font files there. In the snap era this does not work anymore, as one needs to copy the fonts inside the folder with the LO snap package.
              But therefore you would need to have the font files. And even if you do you are legally not allowed to use them since you can only get a license for using them when you buy MS Office. And I would be surprised if the EULA would allow a use off the fonts on that way

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by andyprough View Post

                You should. Here, Miss Quids will get you going with LaTeX: https://yewtu.be/playlist?list=PLzZ0...BZ2tdtZFTuEBZv
                I'd love to learn LaTeX and using something like Lyx makes it look attractive. However, it would be a real PITA to convert even my most-used documents, with all of the styling and colored tables and stuff. And sure, you could say "just use it for new documents then", but then it would look very inconsistent while I'm trying to maintain consistency.
                Last edited by Vistaus; 28 December 2021, 12:46 PM.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by gnarlin View Post
                  The most common complaint that I hear and read about is that LibreOffice isn't compatible enough with MS Office and more specifically doesn't support Excel spreadsheets well. Is there any actual data on compatibility or is this just something that people experienced 10-20 years ago with OpenOffice back in the day and now carry that belief today?
                  There is not only "actual data", but very well documented historical articles dating to LibreOffice's beginnings, twelve years ago or more. The examples offered here are significant because the author (1) is an unabashed fan of LibreOffice---he very much wants it to succeed; he very much would like to NOT be dependent on Microsoft; and (2) he writes for a living (not just tech articles, but books), and knows what it takes to be compatible with what the 'real world' demands, i.e., when one's income and livelihood is at stake.

                  ***********************************
                  LibreOffice 7.2 review - A turning point?
                  https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...-2-review.html

                  "I've tried every single version of this free, open-source suite in the past decade or so, and I've experienced every emotion on the spectrum. The results seesawed widely. Wouldn't it be nice if there was a perfect LibreOffice release? Of course it would! Is 7.2 that release?
                  "...Now, the big thing. Philosophy aside, if we want more people to use LibreOffice, which we do want, then LibreOffice must first support the use of Microsoft's formats seamlessly. Without that capability, people will just use Microsoft Office, because they don't have a choice. No one cares about ideology when they are sending their CV to an employer, or a letter to a lawyer. It's cold, brutal pragmatism. We can talk about bad business practices, bad companies that accept bad formats all day long, but at the end of this long day, it doesn't matter.
                  "...So far, over the past decade, my experience with using Microsoft formats in LibreOffice was mixed, and slowly becoming worse. And I'm losing hope...
                  "...What can I say? LibreOffice 7.2 feels better than its predecessor, but then, it feels like an entirely self-made situation. You have a sub-par release, with lots of bugs and problems, so when these get fixed in a new version, one can perceive these as progress or improvement. Which is true, but it also doesn't take away from the fact none of these issues should have existed in the first place...
                  ***********************************************
                  LibreOffice 7.1 review - The Uncertainty Principle
                  https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...-1-review.html

                  "Sadly, every new version of LibreOffice gets slower than the old ones. I have LibreOffice 5.0 through the latest version installed in about a dozen different operating systems on several machines, and there's a distinct difference in speed and responsiveness among them. In particular, 7.1 feels laggy. Opening and rendering documents takes time, and the interface freezes now and then. Changing layouts takes about 15 seconds in Writer and Impress and almost 30 seconds in Calc. We're talking a brand new system with NVMe, so there's really no reason for anything but the snappiest of behaviors. Alas, not the case....

                  "... LibreOffice 7.1 feels worse than its predecessors. It doesn't introduce anything super cool or useful, but it does bring in more bugs. The speed is also an issue..."
                  **************************************************
                  LibreOffice 7.0 - Words are very unnecessary
                  Updated: August 19, 2020

                  "Over the last few years, I've done a fair share of Libreoffice reviews, focusing on different usability angles. First, there's the program itself and what it does, then whether it's suitable for everyday office use in the Office-heavy reality, and largely because of the previous point, the million-dollar question of when and if and how LibreOffice could actually become a viable, realistic substitute for (Microsoft) Office. My findings from the past dozen summers say no..."

                  https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...-7-review.html
                  ************************************************** ********
                  LibreOffice vs. Microsoft Office in real life
                  Updated: November 19, 2012

                  https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...ft-office.html

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by quikee View Post

                    Well they are not really, because you said:

                    [...]
                    Thank you, quikee

                    OneTimeShot this is exactly the reason. You didn't read that from Wikipedia, you just thought it was true, which is not.

                    OpenOffice is, for all practical purposes, dead. Wikipedia doesn't tell you this, because they remain neutral and it isn't "technically" dead.
                    LibreOffice is the one that is developed and supported properly.

                    Patches from LO do NOT get applied directly to OO. AT ALL. This is a very important difference, which you missed by a mile.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by danmcgrew View Post

                      There is not only "actual data", but very well documented historical articles dating to LibreOffice's beginnings, twelve years ago or more. The examples offered here are significant because the author (1) is an unabashed fan of LibreOffice---he very much wants it to succeed; he very much would like to NOT be dependent on Microsoft; and (2) he writes for a living (not just tech articles, but books), and knows what it takes to be compatible with what the 'real world' demands, i.e., when one's income and livelihood is at stake.

                      ***********************************
                      LibreOffice 7.2 review - A turning point?
                      https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...-2-review.html

                      "I've tried every single version of this free, open-source suite in the past decade or so, and I've experienced every emotion on the spectrum. The results seesawed widely. Wouldn't it be nice if there was a perfect LibreOffice release? Of course it would! Is 7.2 that release?
                      "...Now, the big thing. Philosophy aside, if we want more people to use LibreOffice, which we do want, then LibreOffice must first support the use of Microsoft's formats seamlessly. Without that capability, people will just use Microsoft Office, because they don't have a choice. No one cares about ideology when they are sending their CV to an employer, or a letter to a lawyer. It's cold, brutal pragmatism. We can talk about bad business practices, bad companies that accept bad formats all day long, but at the end of this long day, it doesn't matter.
                      "...So far, over the past decade, my experience with using Microsoft formats in LibreOffice was mixed, and slowly becoming worse. And I'm losing hope...
                      "...What can I say? LibreOffice 7.2 feels better than its predecessor, but then, it feels like an entirely self-made situation. You have a sub-par release, with lots of bugs and problems, so when these get fixed in a new version, one can perceive these as progress or improvement. Which is true, but it also doesn't take away from the fact none of these issues should have existed in the first place...
                      ***********************************************
                      LibreOffice 7.1 review - The Uncertainty Principle
                      https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...-1-review.html

                      "Sadly, every new version of LibreOffice gets slower than the old ones. I have LibreOffice 5.0 through the latest version installed in about a dozen different operating systems on several machines, and there's a distinct difference in speed and responsiveness among them. In particular, 7.1 feels laggy. Opening and rendering documents takes time, and the interface freezes now and then. Changing layouts takes about 15 seconds in Writer and Impress and almost 30 seconds in Calc. We're talking a brand new system with NVMe, so there's really no reason for anything but the snappiest of behaviors. Alas, not the case....

                      "... LibreOffice 7.1 feels worse than its predecessors. It doesn't introduce anything super cool or useful, but it does bring in more bugs. The speed is also an issue..."
                      **************************************************
                      LibreOffice 7.0 - Words are very unnecessary
                      Updated: August 19, 2020

                      "Over the last few years, I've done a fair share of Libreoffice reviews, focusing on different usability angles. First, there's the program itself and what it does, then whether it's suitable for everyday office use in the Office-heavy reality, and largely because of the previous point, the million-dollar question of when and if and how LibreOffice could actually become a viable, realistic substitute for (Microsoft) Office. My findings from the past dozen summers say no..."

                      https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...-7-review.html
                      ************************************************** ********
                      LibreOffice vs. Microsoft Office in real life
                      Updated: November 19, 2012

                      https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...ft-office.html
                      He just shows the typical ignorance. If you have to use the catastrophy ooxml is, you will never have any other choice then using MS Office, period. MS puts a lot of work into being as incompressible with everything (including themselves) as possible as long as they can make people think they use a standard. They only made up ooxml and enforced its standardization through corruption bexause they feared everything not being an ISO standard would be excluded from public calls for tenders, especially in the EU and that they would all jump ship to OpenOffice after they got ODF approved to be the first ISO standard in that area. But as long as people believe that lie and as long as they can count on corruption that prevents them to get their asses kicked out they'll do anything to prevent any real competition. So he can wait forever for a release that could fix all good issues, because you can bet your ass it wouldn't take MS too long to create new incompatibilities.

                      Comment

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