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PAPPL 1.1 Open-Source Printer Framework Adds WiFi Configuration, IPP-USB

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  • PAPPL 1.1 Open-Source Printer Framework Adds WiFi Configuration, IPP-USB

    Phoronix: PAPPL 1.1 Open-Source Printer Framework Adds WiFi Configuration, IPP-USB

    While CUPS 2.4 was recently released as the first big update in years and since OpenPrinting took over upstream development, CUPS founder Michael Sweet continues concurrently developing PAPPL as a modern, open-source printer appication framework. Wednesday marked the release of PAPPL 1.1...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Glad to hear this, because dealing with the manufacturer's driver is kind of a pain...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      Glad to hear this, because dealing with the manufacturer's driver is kind of a pain...
      How much more of a pain are the tens of millions of printers that will end up in landfills worldwide because someone arbitrarily made legacy printer drivers impossible to use at some future date the only thing being 'wrong' with them is they need a driver that someone decided is now unfashionable. It's wrong when Apple did it, and it'll be wrong when CUPS eventually does it.
      Don't believe any significant amount of those printers will get recycled. They won't even if they get broken up by 'recyclers'. They'll end up in landfills or dumped in some third world country leaching into their water supply.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

        How much more of a pain are the tens of millions of printers that will end up in landfills worldwide because someone arbitrarily made legacy printer drivers impossible to use at some future date the only thing being 'wrong' with them is they need a driver that someone decided is now unfashionable. It's wrong when Apple did it, and it'll be wrong when CUPS eventually does it.
        Don't believe any significant amount of those printers will get recycled. They won't even if they get broken up by 'recyclers'. They'll end up in landfills or dumped in some third world country leaching into their water supply.
        How fantastic isn't it that we have projects like, hmm what was the name again... yes PAPPL, that enables "legacy" printers to participate in the modern (or to an extent still up and coming) IPP Everywhere printing workflow.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

          How much more of a pain are the tens of millions of printers that will end up in landfills worldwide because someone arbitrarily made legacy printer drivers impossible to use at some future date the only thing being 'wrong' with them is they need a driver that someone decided is now unfashionable. It's wrong when Apple did it, and it'll be wrong when CUPS eventually does it.
          Don't believe any significant amount of those printers will get recycled. They won't even if they get broken up by 'recyclers'. They'll end up in landfills or dumped in some third world country leaching into their water supply.
          So the reason PAPPL exists is to migrate these printers to a more modern interface that supports every client device that wants to print. We first started talking about doing this five years ago, it will be another two years before we see a version of CUPS that doesn't support printer drivers, and given the conservative nature of many enterprise printer distributions it will likely be another four years (2025) before you won't have access to a distribution with a version of CUPS that supports printer drivers.

          Most printer drivers already have an equivalent printer application, so if we were to "throw the switch" today to turn off printer driver support the number of affected printers would only be in the tens of thousands, not millions. Most printers sold since 2010 (that would be about 1.8 *billion* printers) support driverless printing. Printer applications exist to support older printers and more recent printers that, for whatever reason, haven't adopted AirPrint, IPP Everywhere, Mopria, or Wi-Fi Direct Printing.

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