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KDE Squashes Many "Annoying" Bugs As It Works To Improve The Desktop's Reliability.

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  • mdedetrich
    replied
    Originally posted by sheldonl View Post
    image_1693.png
    I wonder if they fixed the issue pointed out by Linus of LTT. Like can bee seen in the attached screenshot. This is an example of horrific UI design. If not, perhaps I should file bug report.
    This is Manjaro specific software, you should report it there

    Leave a comment:


  • sophisticles
    replied
    They must be wrong, everyone knows that KDE, or any open source software for that matter, has no bugs, it's perfect, flawlessly coded the first time and definitely not bloated and illogically laid out. /s

    Leave a comment:


  • nordkamp
    replied
    Originally posted by avem View Post

    Can you actually read? "Oh, wait, most of them do not work at all in the taskbar (look atrocious and are not customizable at all)."
    Bro u made a bug report like 3 years ago that wasn't actually a bug report it was just you complaining and ignoring everything the devs were saying in response and ur salty that no one cared about it

    dude

    Leave a comment:


  • Terr-E
    replied
    Originally posted by domih View Post
    - Formatting, compare, etc: NotePad++ with Wine, because no TXT file editor on UNIX provides all NotePad++ features. Usage inherited from when my workstation was still running Windows years ago. NotePad++ is the only app I use with Wine.
    I use SublimeTEXT. Yes, it's paid, non-FOSS, but it beats everything else I've tried so far. Just my 2 cents…

    Leave a comment:


  • Ironmask
    replied
    Originally posted by domih View Post
    - Formatting, compare, etc: NotePad++ with Wine, because no TXT file editor on UNIX provides all NotePad++ features. Usage inherited from when my workstation was still running Windows years ago. NotePad++ is the only app I use with Wine.
    What about Geany? I remember that being rather capable, I used it for a long time with minimal complaints.
    (There's also VSCode/VSCodium if you want the latest state-of-the-art editor and have 700MB RAM to spare)

    Leave a comment:


  • MadeUpName
    replied
    Originally posted by ngraham View Post

    This was added by a Fedora-specific patch that they never tried to submit upstream. It broke recently so they deleted it instead of fixing it. I encouraged them to try to submit it upstream but I don't know the result of that.
    Thanks Nathan.

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  • gfunk
    replied
    Kwrite actually looks pretty good, its got line numbers!

    I've been using KDE Wayland most days although plasmashell does crash occasionally

    Leave a comment:


  • domih
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    There's a simple reason everyone on Windows installs Notepad++ and it's the same reason we don't use Notepad, Wordpad, or KWrite -- it's because the second you need to do more than simple text editing you realize that all those programs suck and that you need something like Notepad++ or Kate to be productive.
    Yep, I can relate. On Ubuntu Mate, I settled on (for now):
    - Sys Admin: vim, because no matter which UNIX flavor you connect to vi/vim is there,
    - Reading read me files: Pluma, because it's there,
    - Formatting, compare, etc: NotePad++ with Wine, because no TXT file editor on UNIX provides all NotePad++ features. Usage inherited from when my workstation was still running Windows years ago. NotePad++ is the only app I use with Wine.
    - Python projects: PyCharm, because even though it is commercial $$$ subscription, it works, takes care of a lot of things for you and it is well supported. In other words, it is a time saver (to me) and time spent on customer related tasks (instead of dev env setup) is what I bill to customers.

    Leave a comment:


  • woife
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

    Really? Well fuck me that sucks. Y'all just added a new post-install tweak -- replace KWrite with Kate.

    There's a simple reason everyone on Windows installs Notepad++ and it's the same reason we don't use Notepad, Wordpad, or KWrite -- it's because the second you need to do more than simple text editing you realize that all those programs suck and that you need something like Notepad++ or Kate to be productive.

    I'd add Gedit to that list but I haven't been able to be productive with Gedit since the GNOME2 days. The Gedit transition from GTK 2 to 3 was too much for me to handle. True story: the Debian Sid update that changed Gedit from GTK2 to 3 is literally the month I switched from Debian to Arch and started desktop and window manager hopping over to KDE...nearly a decade ago. For a little bit I settled on XFCE+KWin until XFCE went an updated to GTK3. Anyhoo, needless to say I have strong feelings about messing with the default text editor. I think a lot of us geeks have hangups on the default text editor.

    Vi rules, Emacs sucks, Nano is easy so it's default
    **ducks, covers, and runs**
    Sorry, but I think you got it wrong.

    As far as I understand the change is only about the start menu entry in the favorite bar (left side of start menu). You can add icons to that area by right-clicking on any start menu and selecting "Add to Favorites". And of course there is a small set of default-favorites.

    So if I'm correct this is not about some global replace-kate-with-kile-as-default, but just about the icon in the left side of the start menu ... which I have never used anyway even while using KDE as my main desktop.

    Edit: The Favorites menu is only on the "left side" when using the menu-style start menu. When using e.g. the default "Application Launcher" start menu than it is its own sub-menu.
    Last edited by woife; 27 November 2021, 06:05 PM.

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  • CommunityMember
    replied
    Originally posted by mirmirmir View Post
    - We have 1000 bugs

    - We fix 10 of them

    - 990 bugs remain

    - We add 3 new features

    - We have 1200 bugs remain
    Some organizations require that the user/team who added a new feature prioritize the resolving of the bugs that were created before they are allowed to commit new features (and new bugs), otherwise known as the "You break it, you own it" rule. An alternative methodology is "move fast and break things (and iterate)", expecting that there will, indeed, be a point of less brokenness in the future. Both approaches have advantages and disadvantages, but it is important that the approach be well understood and accepted by the developers and the community so expectations are properly set.

    Leave a comment:

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