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Red Hat / Fedora To Focus On Driving New Linux Video Improvements Around PipeWire

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  • Red Hat / Fedora To Focus On Driving New Linux Video Improvements Around PipeWire

    Phoronix: Red Hat / Fedora To Focus On Driving New Linux Video Improvements Around PipeWire

    PipeWire from the start was designed around handling the needs of both audio and video streams on Linux. While PipeWire is already in use for screencasting/recording under Wayland and working with Flatpak'ed applications, recently much of PipeWire's focus has been on addressing the use-cases of JACK and PulseAudio on the sound side. Now that the audio support is in quite good shape, Red Hat engineers are back to focusing on improvements to the video support...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...ter-Video-2021

  • #2


    Red Hat to VLC: No soup for you!

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    • #3
      Too bad Canonical is shitty again and prefers to wait 5-10 years until they adopt it for Ubuntu and only after that, maybe give a hand to improve it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

        Red Hat to VLC: No soup for you!
        Yeah, the arrows are a bit incomplete in that diagram

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        • #5
          I find it frustrating that every time a system component has reached a stable status (in this case, Pulseaudio, which is finally rock-stable after 15 years of development), it gets replaced by something else and then we get another 5-15 years of bugs and missing functionality. One can hope it's different with PipeWire, but history shows it would be a foolish hope.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by david-nk View Post
            I find it frustrating that every time a system component has reached a stable status (in this case, Pulseaudio, which is finally rock-stable after 15 years of development), it gets replaced by something else and then we get another 5-15 years of bugs and missing functionality. One can hope it's different with PipeWire, but history shows it would be a foolish hope.
            It was the complete opposite experience for me. After 5-15 years of pulseaudio still having bugs and weird quirks, I finally switch to pipewire, which solved them all to me. Only minor annoyances that were fixed after a few weeks after I starting using it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by david-nk View Post
              I find it frustrating that every time a system component has reached a stable status (in this case, Pulseaudio, which is finally rock-stable after 15 years of development), it gets replaced by something else and then we get another 5-15 years of bugs and missing functionality. One can hope it's different with PipeWire, but history shows it would be a foolish hope.
              It is actually NOT rock stable. There are still issues with it. It is mature, sure, but claiming it is rock stable is false.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gufide View Post

                It was the complete opposite experience for me. After 5-15 years of pulseaudio still having bugs and weird quirks, I finally switch to pipewire, which solved them all to me. Only minor annoyances that were fixed after a few weeks after I starting using it.
                That is wonderful to hear then. After years of frustration with various system component changes it would be nice to have a smooth transition for once.

                Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post

                It is actually NOT rock stable. There are still issues with it. It is mature, sure, but claiming it is rock stable is false.
                Perhaps, but it works for my various devices and personal use cases these days, while it suffered from bugs/crashes/annoying behavior before.
                Last edited by david-nk; 01 October 2021, 03:09 PM.

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                • #9
                  I must say, I had many issues in the early days of pulseaudio. None now though. I installed Pipewire last year, and it was completely transparent to me. It's worked the same as pulse for me. I'm very happy with the smooth transition.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by david-nk View Post
                    I find it frustrating that every time a system component has reached a stable status (in this case, Pulseaudio, which is finally rock-stable after 15 years of development), it gets replaced by something else and then we get another 5-15 years of bugs and missing functionality. One can hope it's different with PipeWire, but history shows it would be a foolish hope.
                    I predict that in 8-15 years, Red Hat is purely focused on embedded UIs + SystemdOS, Ubuntu is an entirely streamed/web-based environment for said OS, and both have surprisingly been sold to Amazon (as have a number of small towns across the US). A ground-up replacement for PipeWire is really the only sane option for manageable integration into SystemdOS (crucial components of which are no longer open source, and run on the TrustZone side of a given processor complex.) The new GyesME (formerly 'GNOME,' but that name will have been itself considered an oppressive group of undesirable people) Human Interface Guidelines will hardcode no more than 2 buttons for any given window (more can be added, but it's a lil hacky) as most functionality is expected to be accessed via touch, shake, bop, spin, twist, pull, and obscene, gestures.

                    That's given current consumer electronics, my limited understanding of software development and what I read on phoronix. I'm probably wrong.

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