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Firefox 92 vs. Chrome 94 Browser Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

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  • arQon
    replied
    Originally posted by krzyzowiec View Post
    Just read the last post in that bug report. I'm using Wayland and a Radeon 6800 with the open-source driver. The only special env var I use is "MOZ_ENABLE_WAYLAND=1". All I did was set the flags as mentioned in that bug report and it works.
    Thanks. Doesn't work for me on Intel despite having all those set, so I expect there's just yet another bug in the whole webrender mess disabling it for unrelated reasons.

    > Here you can see the cpu usage numbers I experience while playing video on Youtube.

    Actually, I can't, because the image has been resized down to about 200x100, so the text is unreadable, but I'll take your word for it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Duff~
    replied
    Mozilla T-Fox still number 1 on diversity and Antifa funding.
    Checkmate Shitlord Chrome.

    Leave a comment:


  • krzyzowiec
    replied
    Originally posted by arQon
    That's interesting - because according to bugzilla, video accel on FF has been broken for about 9 months (that is, 3 months after finally getting it working, sigh...) and the ETA to *start* looking at fixing it is FF94 at best. (ref: https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1683808).

    Can you share your HW / display server / etc, and the half-dozen or so about:config flags that you're using? (And any env vars beyond the MOZ_X11_EGL=1 base requirement). Thanks.
    Just read the last post in that bug report. I'm using Wayland and a Radeon 6800 with the open-source driver. The only special env var I use is "MOZ_ENABLE_WAYLAND=1". All I did was set the flags as mentioned in that bug report and it works. One thing I should mention is that you need to set media.av1.enabled to false, because hardware acceleration only works for VP9 in my experience.

    Here you can see the cpu usage numbers I experience while playing video on Youtube.

    Leave a comment:


  • pkese
    replied
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: Firefox 92 vs. Chrome 94 Browser Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

    Given last week's release of Chrome 94, here are some fresh browser benchmarks looking at Firefox 92 stable against Chrome 94 running on Ubuntu Linux...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...-94-Benchmarks
    It would be nice to have a benchmark that would measure the amount of memory used ... i.e. load 50 tabs and see how much memory is left.

    Leave a comment:


  • Termy
    replied
    Originally posted by Mario Junior View Post

    Who the hell uses more than 100 tabs? Seems like a /g/ user with thousand tabs opened.
    Who the hell doesn't use MAC and the like?
    Ever thought of different preferences/workflows/usecases?

    I currently have around 250 Tabs in 17 Groups - i use them as kind of a "intermediate bookmark" so to speak.
    And with Firefox thats absolutely no problem - chromium will choke to death when trying to do so. (and i'm not even talking about ram usage)

    Leave a comment:


  • caligula
    replied
    Originally posted by Mario Junior View Post

    Who the hell uses more than 100 tabs? Seems like a /g/ user with thousand tabs opened.
    Sure go ahead blame the user. FWIW 100 tabs isn't that many considering that even the lowest end machines can deal with say 10 tabs, and these high end workstations have more than 10x as much RAM. So the only reason this doesn't work is bad quality code in Chrome. Seriously look at the tab row, it even becomes impossible to click on a tab since Chrome makes them smaller and smaller.

    Leave a comment:


  • onlyLinuxLuvUBack
    replied
    Originally posted by Mez' View Post
    Not one bit. Everybody knows Chrome is good at benchmarking. But nobody actually cares about these when browsing.


    I do.
    A while back, I had 870 tabs open. I have a huge number open especially when leaving a research pending on a topic, so that I can take it on when I make time. But I usually have around 200 tabs in 5-7 windows, organized by themes (like I would use workspaces).
    And with Firefox, I never ever lose them. I still have tabs open for more than 2 years back. And yes, I will come back to them at some point. So no, limitation period doesn't apply.
    Is this like 1 cat picture per tab or some tabs have multiple pics ?

    Leave a comment:


  • jjmcwill2003
    replied
    Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
    What are real world JavaScript cases where Firefox user experience would be severely impacted vs. Chromium? I'm rather happy with its performance on my Z2 Force Android device, which isn't a rocket, but not low-end either (OctanceV2 score is ~7k).

    .
    I guess I have an opposing viewpoint. My biggest "performance" use case is the Caltopo mapping application. With a lot waypoints and routes on a map, their rendering gets really slow to the point that sometimes the browser will pop up a dialog saying, "This app isn't responding... Wait or Cancel"

    Chrome is significantly better at handling these use cases than Firefox, and it's proven out in these canned benchmarks. It's just a faster web browser for JS heavy stuff.

    Now, I'm sure a lot of JS/web devs will chime in and suggest that Caltopo is probably using really inefficient rendering code. That could be the case. Feel free to apply for a position with the Caltopo team as a (paid) developer and get those performance issues fixed. I for one, would be extremely grateful to see Caltopo running faster. :-D

    But until that happens, I run Chrome for Caltopo (and Firefox for just about everything else, because it's good enough.)

    Leave a comment:


  • rhavenn
    replied
    The Multi-Account Containers Extension (Mozilla native extension) for Firefox is worth it alone. Lets you have multiple tabs with different accounts logged into the same place (ie: a user, admin and/or dev accounts logged into Azure portal, for example). The real world usage differences between the 2 performance wise is not noticeable in my opinion on the majority of sites.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mez'
    replied
    Originally posted by cl333r View Post
    It's funny you didn't discover the concept of bookmarks or trying to get organized.

    What are you on about? I have enough bookmarks as it is. At some point, if you need to scroll forever down a list, or go to sub-sub-sub-folders, bookmarking gets unproductive.
    Also, bookmarking is great for portals (page one of a site), or for specific tutorial pages. But bookmarking a page you will read once when you make the time makes no sense.
    The only useful thing for these is a "Reading list" (Read Later) such as in Chrome lately (their only decent feature).

    Leave a comment:

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