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Red Hat Is Hiring So Linux Can Finally Have Good HDR Display Support

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  • Awesomeness
    replied
    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
    Source?
    Probably the client list of his employer, Red Hat.

    Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post
    Not for color management they don't which is whats relevant here. If you are talking about studios here, they tend to use Linux for servers (no real surprise there), rendering farms or if they do use it for desktop its for graphics and not color touching.

    Studios don't use Linux when they need to do color because Linux is absolutely terrible in this.
    Oh, glorious how you're actually trying to tell the man from Red Hat that he does not have any customers that run applications like DaVinci Resolve.

    🍿🍿🍿🍿

    Leave a comment:


  • caligula
    replied
    Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post

    That is because HDR is classified by both contrast and colour depth, so the 8-bit HDR displays have the extra contrast but not the extra colour depth and since they support HDR contrast they are "HDR", just that they don't have to specify which of the classifications they met.
    I can see how 10bit color channels introduce new challenges vs 8bit. But how is the contrast such an issue? I suppose all sorts of different gamut settings have similar kinds of problems outside 100% sRGB.

    Leave a comment:


  • MadeUpName
    replied
    Originally posted by partcyborg View Post
    FINALLY!

    SO happy someone is finally stepping up to make this happen. Lack of HDR is the one thing my Kodi based media player is missing. Every few months I check to see how much progress has been made on adding support, even on the bleeding edge, and the answer has always none whatsoever
    Kodi has HDR support. Wayland is the big bottle neck right now. As RH was the ones really pushing Wayland it makes sense that they step up. But I also highly suspect that BMD and many others are leaning on them to get it in gear.

    https://www.collabora.com/news-and-b...dynamic-range/

    Leave a comment:


  • sophisticles
    replied
    Originally posted by mroche View Post
    To add clarification, "studios" tends to refer to feature animation studios e.g. Pixar, WDAS, DreamWorks and contracted VFX studios e.g. DNeg, DD, ILM, MPC, etc, usually on the medium to larger size. In this situation, the use of RHEL/CentOS is pretty much de facto, and not just for servers. A good portion of that stems from the transition from IRIX (MIPS) to x86 where Red Hat Linux was ready to scoop up that customer base. I personally worked at Pixar and Blue Sky (at Red Hat now, thanks Disney), along with knowing what a bunch of the other studios are doing because we all talk with each other and our vendors.
    So, the dishonesty and misrepresentation continues. When people say things like "studios" and "Hollywood uses", that tends to strongly suggest all "studios" involved in the making of movies and tv, not just 3d animation.

    But since you arbitrarily defined "studios" in the manner you did and since you mentioned Pixar, let's see what a Pixar scientist has to say:

    https://sciencebehindpixar.org/ask-a-pixar-scientist

    Pixar has a huge "render farm," which is basically a supercomputer composed of 2000 machines, and 24,000 cores. This makes it one of the 25 largest supercomputers in the world. That said, with all that computing power, it still took two years to render Monster's University.

    β€” Peter Collingridge; Khan Academy
    So Pixar does not use Linux based desktops, they use a supercomputer that is one of the 25 largest in the world. And I am fairly certain that they probably do use either a custom Linux based or BSD based OS, primarily because the licensing costs of Windows HPC is through the roof, as are the licensing costs for UNIX.

    As for Dreamworks:

    https://www.techradar.com/news/world...ndered-1127122

    One of our first realizations, after meeting an animator, is that just about every frame of a movie such as Rise of the Guardians is created using an HP Workstation Z820. This behemoth is outfitted with two Intel Xeon E5-2687W processors, running at 3.1GHz each. Because each system has eight cores, animators can use 16 cores for processing animation files.
    https://www8.hp.com/h20195/v2/getpdf.aspx/c04111526.pdf

    Now this article is a bit old and the HP workstation referenced is available with either Windows or Linux, so maybe they do use Linux in some rendering capacity, but according to this they use Premo, which seems to be a custom built software:

    https://www.theverge.com/2014/6/12/5...-your-dragon-2

    https://www.awn.com/animationworld/d...ci-tech-honors

    http://www.olivier-ladeuix.com/blog/...tion-software/

    Honestly, the more I read about the custom software that Pixar and Dreamworks use, the more I think that they may not even run on an OS per se, they may be using custom setups where the rendering software runs on bare metal, maybe even coded with extensive assembler, based on the claims of speed.

    Leave a comment:


  • MadeUpName
    replied
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post

    Have you ever used Resolve? I have been using it for years, getting it to work reliably on Linux is a nightmare, there's all sorts of text and GUI scaling issues, and that's assuming you can even get it to launch and run after you have it installed. The most success i have had is with Ubuntu and Fedora, the rest of the distros I don't even bother.

    If you want the best Resolve experience you use a Mac, and specifically the new M1, with a Windows based pc being a close second.

    Hate to break this to all those living in Linux fantasy land, but if you want reliable, quality video editing of any kind, you nearly always want to first go with a Mac and then a Windows based system as a close second.
    Ya except the fact that BMD has a RH7 image that is their blessed standard. Not a windows image or a Mac Image. The only issue with installing Resolve on Linux is if you have an AMD card because resolve needs either Cuda or openCL to run and AMDs openCL support sucks rhinos.

    Leave a comment:


  • MadeUpName
    replied
    Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post

    Furthermore Davinci Resolve only started supporting Linux recently so claiming that in the industry people mainly run it with Linux just doesn't add up and is disingenuous.
    The Wiz started on Apple but only lasted a brief period of time. Davinci ran on custom hardware. Resolve started on Linux and only later was ported to Mac and then later Windows. Give this a look. The whole thing is well worth watching..

    https://youtu.be/7WvP5_HFQSk?t=1017

    Leave a comment:


  • sophisticles
    replied
    Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post
    There are film studios that run on Linux but as I mentioned, its a custom tailored Linux that Davinci created and such studios have enough resources to throw at the problem. This was mainly a result of Linux having better support for multiple GPU's (Windows didn't support this case too well in the OS, MacOSx up until now historically shipped with terrible GPU's compared to typical PC hardware).

    This is now changing though, the most powerful Radeon GPU just got announced that is being released exclusively for the mac pro and Windows has gotten better in scaling with multiple GPU's.
    Are you high?

    Linux having better support for multiple GPU's (Windows didn't support this case too well in the OS
    Again, are you high? Linux barely supports 1 GPU, forget about having "better support for multiple GPU's".

    https://cubethethird.wordpress.com/2...etting-better/

    Meanwhile Windows has multi GPU support built right in Win 10:

    https://www.thefpsreview.com/2020/08...-settings-app/

    Meanwhile you could run a multiple GPU even on Win 98:

    https://www.computerhope.com/issues/...5.htm#win98req

    SLI has been running on Windows since the XP days:

    https://hothardware.com/reviews/sli-...he-microscope-

    https://pcpartpicker.com/user/codezer0/saved/Qn3FGX

    https://youtu.be/QSa5nBaiC5g

    Linux having better support for multiple GPU's (Windows didn't support this case too well in the OS
    Seriously, what are you smoking?

    Leave a comment:


  • thxcv
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    You sure about that? 'Cause BB claimed just a few months ago that VW, BMW and Mercedes are using QNX: https://blogs.blackberry.com/en/2021...llion-vehicles
    That's true, the car consists of more than just infotainment... The infotainment part is usually linux (including Android) based though

    Leave a comment:


  • birdie
    replied
    Originally posted by wswartzendruber View Post

    MakeMKV is a thing that exists. Some of us use it. I'm going through my entire 4K library and ripping everything to HLG (so that they look good regardless of HDR support).

    Games also use HDR. You can bet that the people at Valve are very interested in Proton supporting this.

    There's also native content mastering. I'm sure Blender will pickup support for this in some way.
    IOW nothing for normal people, OK

    Leave a comment:


  • wswartzendruber
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    Most high-quality HDR content on the net is DRM-riddled films and Windows/console games. How are you going to apply it to your media player exactly?
    MakeMKV is a thing that exists. Some of us use it. I'm going through my entire 4K library and ripping everything to HLG (so that they look good regardless of HDR support).

    Games also use HDR. You can bet that the people at Valve are very interested in Proton supporting this.

    There's also native content mastering. I'm sure Blender will pickup support for this in some way.

    Leave a comment:

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