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Red Hat Is Hiring So Linux Can Finally Have Good HDR Display Support

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  • dragorth
    replied
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post

    Nonsense! Any professional grade NLE runs far superior on Windows or OSX than it does on Linux, if it even has a Linux port at all.

    But feel free to provide any links that support your claim.
    Almost every Autodesk product runs on Linux, and it is generally agreed that rendering on Nvidia hardware on Linux renders faster in Maya, the industry standard for decades for animation and creation, used in most big name movies from Monsters, Inc. to Toy Story, not to mention companies outside of Disney.

    Even Blender renders faster under Linux vs Windows, and OSX is a joke, thanks to not supporting OpenGL.

    Leave a comment:


  • mdedetrich
    replied
    Originally posted by Awesomeness View Post
    Probably the client list of his employer, Red Hat.



    Oh, glorious how you're actually trying to tell the man from Red Hat that he does not have any customers that run applications like DaVinci Resolve.

    🍿🍿🍿🍿
    Well if you are talking about color management, as stated earlier they don't use Xorg for this but an external capture device. The fact that it runs here on Linux is irrelevant because they essentially bypassing the entire OS in this process (which isn't surprising considering that color management is a mess in Linux).

    I don't get what your point here is.

    Originally posted by pal666 View Post
    but they aren't using qnx exclusively. and btw they are using it less and less
    Source

    All I can tell from public press is that QNX Neutrino's use is actually increasing (see https://www.heise.de/hintergrund/Kuh...h-4863254.html) in auto space because

    1. Its a proper hard RT os (Linux requires a lot of patches for this and even then its not the same). Depending on what component we are talking about in a car, this is a requirement
    2. Its a microkernel which means it can properly isolate components. If some driver crashes in Linux it can hard lock the entire OS, you don't want this to happen when you are in the middle of driving a car

    In fact you if you look at the list at https://qnxauto.blogspot.com/2015/06...x-in-cars.html (last updated 2015) there are more car manufactures that do use QNX rather than ones that do not
    Last edited by mdedetrich; 19 September 2021, 09:55 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • birdie
    replied
    Originally posted by coder View Post
    Well, wswartzendruber did mention gaming, but that's still not something the majority of users do, on their Linux desktop.

    This comment is rather puzzling, as if you're expecting that each advancement in technology should be immediately relevant to the majority of users. Traditionally, the boundaries of tech are pushed by the most demanding users. Then, as the tech matures, it trickles down to the mainstream, where other opportunistic applications take advantage of it and widen the pool of beneficiaries.

    In this case, the early adopters should be:
    • Video production
    • Video consumption
    • Photo editing
    • Games
    Once the tech has matured, perhaps browsers will embrace it. The arrival of newer image formats, and the fact that most phone cameras have supported HDR for a while, should mean there's no lack of HDR content to populate the web. This should provide benefits even to the masses of unwashed, bearded Linux admins.
    Absolute most smartphone (cameras) output to JPEG which doesn't support HDR in any shape or form unfortunately, and people don't shoot videos in HDR because of humongous file sizes. HDR is still gimmicky as hell for most users out there even on Windows, of course rare HDR enabled games and rare movies notwithstanding.

    Leave a comment:


  • pal666
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
    You sure about that? 'Cause BB claimed just a few months ago that VW, BMW and Mercedes are using QNX
    but they aren't using qnx exclusively. and btw they are using it less and less

    Leave a comment:


  • tomas
    replied
    Originally posted by dec05eba View Post

    Im literally watching a hdr video on youtube right now with chromium + nvidia + x11 and it works and chromium even detects and says that hdr is enabled on my system
    And you have a HDR capable monitor?
    It seems very unlikely that ChristianSchaller ,the head of RedHat's desktop team would be wrong. Furthermore, you have karolherbst, Nouveau developer working for RedHat, telling you that you are wrong:

    https://www.phoronix.com/forums/foru...79307#post1279

    Now, what are the possibilities for them to be wrong and you right? I would say the chances are almost nonexistent.
    ​​ ​​​​
    ​​​​
    Last edited by tomas; 19 September 2021, 04:32 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • dec05eba
    replied
    Originally posted by tomas View Post
    BTW, this HDR feature will be wayland exclusive. More info from Christian Schallers post here

    https://blogs.gnome.org/uraeus/2021/...kstation-land/

    And no, despite what some people claim, X11 does not support HDR and it probably never will. I think that from this point going forward, this will be increasingly common. We will see features being added that only work with Wayland, which is natural after all. Wayland and associated technologies like pipewire for screencasting and libei for emulated inputs are closing the feature gap to X11 and once this is done we will see new capabilities and features that build upon wayland that will not be brought to X11.
    It also looks increasingly likely that wlroots will be the defacto building blocks for future wayland compositors. We already have Sway, Wayfire, Valves Gamescope, KwinFT, Phosh and some others that are built on wlroots.
    Im literally watching a hdr video on youtube right now with chromium + nvidia + x11 and it works and chromium even detects and says that hdr is enabled on my system

    Leave a comment:


  • pal666
    replied
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post
    So, the dishonesty and misrepresentation continues.
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post
    But since you arbitrarily defined "studios" in the manner you did and since you mentioned Pixar, let's see what a Pixar scientist has to say:
    and scientist says "we have large linux server farm"
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post
    So Pixar does not use Linux based desktops, they use a supercomputer that is one of the 25 largest in the world.
    did you skip math classes in school? they do use supercomputer, but you provided zero evidence that they do not use linux desktops, desktops aren't mutually exclusive with servers.

    and this is followed with page of garbage which still contains zero evidence to back your claim. hanlon's razor says you aren't dishonest

    Leave a comment:


  • tomas
    replied
    Originally posted by mroche View Post
    Now this, THIS, is a magnificent piece of... I don't know what the heck. But I appreciate you trying to disprove my own real-life work experience as a film industry Linux sysadmin with delusion...
    Yes, that was hilarious πŸ˜‚. But sophisticles would never let actual facts get in his way. He's like a flat earther. He's made up his mind but don't have any actual real life experience to prove his point, just opinions. And since his opinion is that Windows is "The Greatest Operating System Ever Created In The Universe" and certainly must be used on the desktop everywhere in all industry segments, it's impossible to prove to him he's wrong. Even if you took him physically to those studios you mention and sat him down right in front of Linux desktops used, he would still claim it was Windows or MacOS or perhaps that you just temporarily installed Linux on it. But his comments sure make for a good laugh. I will keep that one for future reference, because it was a real gem. ​​
    Last edited by tomas; 19 September 2021, 09:07 AM.

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  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by coder View Post
    Data point noted.

    I'm glad you fared better that I have, because I wouldn't wish this user experience on anyone. I know my employer has at least 3 different flavors of security software running on it, but I still blame the core OS for any actual instability, even if parts of it are being subject to an unusual degree of stress. The bluescreens got so bad, at times, that I started keeping a speadsheet to try and detect patterns across machines, different updates, and different usage patterns. That was after running various hardware diags and making sure my drivers were all up-to-date.
    And that's why it's always worth the effort to try and bargain for a BYOD arrangement where possible.

    The company's IT support crew may be competent but that competency is completely pointless if the original Windows image used for deployment is already terrible. I know for a fact that my clean Windows installations will always be superior to any mass deployed image.

    Leave a comment:


  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
    I like Windows 10. It hardly felt slow on an Apollo Lake Atom x7-E3950 processor. If anything, Windows 10 was more responsive on that system compared to Gnome Wayland and Plasma Wayland on Debian 10 and 11.
    Data point noted.

    I'm glad you fared better that I have, because I wouldn't wish this user experience on anyone. I know my employer has at least 3 different flavors of security software running on it, but I still blame the core OS for any actual instability, even if parts of it are being subject to an unusual degree of stress. The bluescreens got so bad, at times, that I started keeping a speadsheet to try and detect patterns across machines, different updates, and different usage patterns. That was after running various hardware diags and making sure my drivers were all up-to-date.

    Leave a comment:

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