Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Red Hat Is Hiring So Linux Can Finally Have Good HDR Display Support

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
    mroche
    Senior Member

  • mroche
    replied
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post

    Nonsense! Any professional grade NLE runs far superior on Windows or OSX than it does on Linux, if it evens has a Linux port at all.

    But feel free to provide any links that support your claim.
    For those of us that have been in or are in the industry, what
    ChristianSchaller
    Phoronix Member
    ChristianSchaller said is a generally understood statement and accurate. That being said, there is a wide range of types of studios, and not all use Linux.

    To add clarification, "studios" tends to refer to feature animation studios e.g. Pixar, WDAS, DreamWorks and contracted VFX studios e.g. DNeg, DD, ILM, MPC, etc, usually on the medium to larger size. In this situation, the use of RHEL/CentOS is pretty much de facto, and not just for servers. A good portion of that stems from the transition from IRIX (MIPS) to x86 where Red Hat Linux was ready to scoop up that customer base. I personally worked at Pixar and Blue Sky (at Red Hat now, thanks Disney), along with knowing what a bunch of the other studios are doing because we all talk with each other and our vendors.

    That isn't to say things are 100% Linux. Things like story, design, editorial and final coloring tend have a tendency to not take place on Linux even within the aforementioned studios, but that has more to do with software decisions and what OS's they support (looking at you, Avid and Adobe). For groups using Resolve on Linux, if you pair it up with both a dedicated output card that's HDR capable (DeckLink, AJA) and an HDR capable reference monitor, you can do HDR grading on Linux because the software chain completely bypasses Xorg and their limitations for that display. Same thing for Autodesk Flame (RHEL and macOS). This is not an inexpensive solution if you want to be testing/working with HDR content natively throughout the pipeline, like in compositing.

    If were talking about smaller or more boutique shops that focus on a particular area, like mograph, editorial, coloring, then yes the Linux usage is not going to be as common. But if you're talking about the studios that do the bulk of the post-production CG work, then a significant majority have nearly complete Linux based pipelines, with the exception of where tools or historical setups don't let them.

    Cheers,
    Mike
    mroche
    Senior Member
    Last edited by mroche; 18 September 2021, 01:28 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • mdedetrich
    Senior Member

  • mdedetrich
    replied
    Originally posted by numasan View Post
    Is over a decade "recently" in your mind? Your ignorance is so obvious it's baffling why you're commenting here. Talk about being disingenuous...
    Are you talking about the recent versions of Davinci which can run on any Linux or the server version which historically came with their custom Linux or servers? Because historically Davinci resolve ran on a custom Linux that they provided (based on Cent/Redhat) in order for software to work correctly. They even advised you to not even connect to the internet as to not update Linux machines, and they were doing things like pinning NVidia drivers.

    If we are talking about installing Davinci on generic Linux OS, that only came out somewhat recently (3 years ago iirc).

    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post

    Have you ever used Resolve? I have been using it for years, getting it to work reliably on Linux is a nightmare, there's all sorts of text and GUI scaling issues, and that's assuming you can even get it to launch and run after you have it installed. The most success i have had is with Ubuntu and Fedora, the rest of the distros I don't even bother.

    If you want the best Resolve experience you use a Mac, and specifically the new M1, with a Windows based pc being a close second.

    Hate to break this to all those living in Linux fantasy land, but if you want reliable, quality video editing of any kind, you nearly always want to first go with a Mac and then a Windows based system as a close second.
    There are film studios that run on Linux but as I mentioned, its a custom tailored Linux that Davinci created and such studios have enough resources to throw at the problem. This was mainly a result of Linux having better support for multiple GPU's (Windows didn't support this case too well in the OS, MacOSx up until now historically shipped with terrible GPU's compared to typical PC hardware).

    This is now changing though, the most powerful Radeon GPU just got announced that is being released exclusively for the mac pro and Windows has gotten better in scaling with multiple GPU's.
    mdedetrich
    Senior Member
    Last edited by mdedetrich; 18 September 2021, 12:43 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • sophisticles
    Senior Member

  • sophisticles
    replied
    Originally posted by numasan View Post
    Is over a decade "recently" in your mind? Your ignorance is so obvious it's baffling why you're commenting here. Talk about being disingenuous...
    You have no idea what you are talking about and it is obvious that you have never actually attempted to use Resolve on Linux or compared it to the experience of running it on a Mac or Windows.

    Leave a comment:

  • sophisticles
    Senior Member

  • sophisticles
    replied
    Originally posted by numasan View Post

    Based on your comment I don't expect you to understand what this software does, its place in the industry and why/when it is used on Linux:
    https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/pro...resolve/studio
    Have you ever used Resolve? I have been using it for years, getting it to work reliably on Linux is a nightmare, there's all sorts of text and GUI scaling issues, and that's assuming you can even get it to launch and run after you have it installed. The most success i have had is with Ubuntu and Fedora, the rest of the distros I don't even bother.

    If you want the best Resolve experience you use a Mac, and specifically the new M1, with a Windows based pc being a close second.

    Hate to break this to all those living in Linux fantasy land, but if you want reliable, quality video editing of any kind, you nearly always want to first go with a Mac and then a Windows based system as a close second.

    Leave a comment:

  • sophisticles
    Senior Member

  • sophisticles
    replied
    This line right here:

    Underrepresented minorities highly encouraged
    Tells me that this project will be another one in a long line of Linux undertakings that are in development for decades and never get finished.

    There's a saying, "get woke, go broke", that applies here.

    Instead of "Underrepresented minorities highly encouraged" how about instead saying "people with extensive education, like a PhD in comp sci, and extensive experience, highly encouraged, so that this can be finished sometime this century".

    Leave a comment:

  • sophisticles
    Senior Member

  • sophisticles
    replied
    Originally posted by ChristianSchaller View Post

    Actually almost all studios use Linux for the desktop.
    Nonsense! Any professional grade NLE runs far superior on Windows or OSX than it does on Linux, if it even has a Linux port at all.

    But feel free to provide any links that support your claim.
    sophisticles
    Senior Member
    Last edited by sophisticles; 18 September 2021, 12:35 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • Vistaus
    Senior Member

  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by thxcv View Post

    VW.OS is just the name of the infotainment system though. It is based on linux, just like most of the other infotainment systems from VW as well as BMW and Mercedes and many others. In the end they're just embedded systems so the chance is high it is based on linux, not matter the brand.
    You sure about that? 'Cause BB claimed just a few months ago that VW, BMW and Mercedes are using QNX: https://blogs.blackberry.com/en/2021...llion-vehicles
    Vistaus
    Senior Member
    Last edited by Vistaus; 18 September 2021, 11:52 AM.

    Leave a comment:

  • Vistaus
    Senior Member

  • Vistaus
    replied
    And just the other day, people on here were raving about how Wayland and X11 already had great HDR support………

    Leave a comment:

  • blacknova
    Senior Member

  • blacknova
    replied
    Well it is not like Windows support for HDR is superb and without any issues.
    A lot of old games would render incorrectly with HDR enabled, HDR enabled UI is lot slower which might be not noticeable on high-end hardware but easily spotted on ULV laptops.
    Windows 11 should support AutoHDR which would enable HDR on supported display only if application running require HDR, and for now that would be best solution.
    blacknova
    Senior Member
    Last edited by blacknova; 18 September 2021, 11:44 AM.

    Leave a comment:

  • birdie
    Senior Member

  • birdie
    replied
    Originally posted by partcyborg View Post
    FINALLY!

    SO happy someone is finally stepping up to make this happen. Lack of HDR is the one thing my Kodi based media player is missing. Every few months I check to see how much progress has been made on adding support, even on the bleeding edge, and the answer has always none whatsoever
    Most high-quality HDR content on the net is DRM-riddled films and Windows/console games. How are you going to apply it to your media player exactly?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X