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Wine 6.17 Released With Better HiDPI Support For Built-In Apps

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  • Linuxxx
    replied
    Originally posted by muncrief View Post
    Well, all I can say is Valve better get Proton working on 99% of all existing games, and not just quickly, they needed to have it done yesterday. But, just as with the Steam Machine, they're literally throwing vast piles of cash on a bonfire and trying to manufacture and sell the Steam Deck long before the software is ready.

    But this time they do have one thing that might possibly allow them to at least break even, apparently people will be able to install Windows on the Steam Deck.

    And believe me, the minute they find one game they want to play that won't work on Proton, they'll indeed install Windows.

    I wish this wasn't true. But as a long time Wine user who even developed my own Wine Manager system, and served as a game maintainer for a few years, I can tell you that Wine, even with the Proton patches, is still lightyears away from being a Windows replacement.

    And until everyone who develops Wine can get together and set common goals, broken out into tasks in a comprehensive plan to get Wine up to speed, I don't see Wine ever succeeding as originally envisioned.

    I know this is a hard truth that may anger some, but that's one of the reasons Wine is still failing. Too many simply want to make excuses for its deficiencies, and blame any messenger that dares point them out. But still, the failure of Wine is not inevitable. Only most likely as many would rather fight than fix it.
    No, it won't be easily possible to install Windows on the Steam Deck and actually use it to play games, because AMD most likely won't ship support for it in their Windows GPU drivers and thus no usable hardware acceleration for any graphics API.

    Also, VALVe is already doing more for Linux gaming than any other entity in this space, with working Anti-Cheat support promised in the launch window as one of the last major hurdles then crossed.

    What more do you expect to get for free?

    Leave a comment:


  • Linuxxx
    replied
    Originally posted by SerialCool View Post
    Is Proton a better alternative to wine-staging 6.16-1 with dxvk 1.9.1 to install and run local games without Steam via Setup.exe?
    Or is Proton only designed to install and run games from the Steam directory?
    Have some games on local disks and looking for the optimal way to play them. To which option should you use for this? I use Manjaro Linux.

    Thanks community
    If you are not using Steam but rely on GOG instead of just pirating Steam games, then the best approach is to use Lutris & its custom WINE versions based on WINE-GE by the glorious "GloriousEggroll".

    Do note though that you will miss out on one of the greatest feature of Proton, namely the so-called 'fullscreen-hack', which especially comes in handy on 4K screens, since it was removed in the latest Lutris-GE builds.

    Leave a comment:


  • muncrief
    replied
    Well, all I can say is Valve better get Proton working on 99% of all existing games, and not just quickly, they needed to have it done yesterday. But, just as with the Steam Machine, they're literally throwing vast piles of cash on a bonfire and trying to manufacture and sell the Steam Deck long before the software is ready.

    But this time they do have one thing that might possibly allow them to at least break even, apparently people will be able to install Windows on the Steam Deck.

    And believe me, the minute they find one game they want to play that won't work on Proton, they'll indeed install Windows.

    I wish this wasn't true. But as a long time Wine user who even developed my own Wine Manager system, and served as a game maintainer for a few years, I can tell you that Wine, even with the Proton patches, is still lightyears away from being a Windows replacement.

    And until everyone who develops Wine can get together and set common goals, broken out into tasks in a comprehensive plan to get Wine up to speed, I don't see Wine ever succeeding as originally envisioned.

    I know this is a hard truth that may anger some, but that's one of the reasons Wine is still failing. Too many simply want to make excuses for its deficiencies, and blame any messenger that dares point them out. But still, the failure of Wine is not inevitable. Only most likely as many would rather fight than fix it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by theuserbl View Post

    There existing
    - the standard WINE
    - WINE staging
    - the Proton fork by Valve
    - the CrossOver fork by Codeweavers

    Thats it.
    No, that's not it: there's also the Wine fork by the ReactOS team.

    Leave a comment:


  • sdack
    replied
    Originally posted by linner View Post
    Anyone know how many different versions/ways to run Wine there are? My understanding is that sometimes the mainline version won't run stuff but then you switch the Steam Wine and it works. It's very confusing. How many different blends of Wine are there?
    To add to the already good answers is it often not only about WINE. So are there applications that require the Windows fonts, but many distros only suggest these as part of a WINE installation. Users then do not know this and see their application failing when all they really need to do is to install the suggested fonts package. It is the same with DXVK, which is also often only a suggested or optional package.

    But there are also problems with WINE itself that require additional work by users. So does WINE implement countless of Windows DLLs, but their implementations are often not 100% complete and so it requires user to install some of the original Microsoft DLLs in addition to their application in some of the cases.

    Steams' Proton does not work much different from your normal WINE version. Only does it avoid the above mentioned problems by including all that which otherwise is taken as optional and makes it a requirement. It knows which games require an original DLL and installs it for the users, and so users do not have the burden of figuring out each and every detail for themselves.

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by theuserbl View Post

    There existing
    - the standard WINE
    - WINE staging
    - the Proton fork by Valve
    - the CrossOver fork by Codeweavers

    Thats it.
    And you can say that all are OpenSource.
    CrossOver have only its bottle-system closed. But the source of the WINE part are open. And are at first submitted to WINE itself. But WINE don't accepted all changes, because of code qualaty So CrossOver and WINE differ.
    Similar with Proton. Proton is completely OpenSource. And it using its own Direct3D implementation which is OpenSource, too.. But different to the WINE one.
    There's also the kajillion or so out of tree patches and builds for specific programs and games (Lutris has them) and versions from Glorious Eggroll (wine/proton-ge, also in Lutris or AUR). I'd say those are just as valid as the ones you listed....I actually use Wine and Proton GE as my defaults.

    Linuxxx There really is no "best version" or "best one to use" due to the fact that different programs and games run better or worse depending on the build. I use Wine and Proton GE versions (Wine GE for system, Proton GE for Steam), but if performance isn't acceptable or they don't work then I'll check the WineDB, try vanilla Wine, vanilla Protons, check Lutris and see if they have a custom build for that specific game, check the FroggingFamily if they have patches for that specific game, etc (except CrossOver since I don't have it). Usually Wine/Proton GE just work which is why I start from there.

    Leave a comment:


  • birdie
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
    Does Wine have any roadmap?
    How much of the Windows API is covered by Wine?
    How compatible is Wine?

    Does it run Visual Studio, Microsoft Office, Maya, AutoCAD, Photoshop?
    - Not really.
    - Wine developers used to measure this but then they stopped.
    - It depends.

    - Try, no one can say. https://appdb.winehq.org has a lot of info on how various applications run under Wine.

    Leave a comment:


  • SerialCool
    replied
    Is Proton a better alternative to wine-staging 6.16-1 with dxvk 1.9.1 to install and run local games without Steam via Setup.exe?
    Or is Proton only designed to install and run games from the Steam directory?
    Have some games on local disks and looking for the optimal way to play them. To which option should you use for this? I use Manjaro Linux.

    Thanks community

    Leave a comment:


  • uid313
    replied
    Does Wine have any roadmap?
    How much of the Windows API is covered by Wine?
    How compatible is Wine?

    Does it run Visual Studio, Microsoft Office, Maya, AutoCAD, Photoshop?

    Leave a comment:


  • theuserbl
    replied
    Originally posted by linner View Post
    Anyone know how many different versions/ways to run Wine there are? My understanding is that sometimes the mainline version won't run stuff but then you switch the Steam Wine and it works. It's very confusing. How many different blends of Wine are there?
    There existing
    - the standard WINE
    - WINE staging
    - the Proton fork by Valve
    - the CrossOver fork by Codeweavers

    Thats it.
    And you can say that all are OpenSource.
    CrossOver have only its bottle-system closed. But the source of the WINE part are open. And are at first submitted to WINE itself. But WINE don't accepted all changes, because of code qualaty So CrossOver and WINE differ.
    Similar with Proton. Proton is completely OpenSource. And it using its own Direct3D implementation which is OpenSource, too.. But different to the WINE one.

    Leave a comment:

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