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KDE Introduces KCommandBar For HUD-Style Popups

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  • KDE Introduces KCommandBar For HUD-Style Popups

    Phoronix: KDE Introduces KCommandBar For HUD-Style Popups

    Following the introduction of KHamburgerMenu, the latest KDE user-interface element being introduced is KCommandBar for expert-focused, HUD-style pop-ups...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...es-KCommandBar

  • #2
    That's pretty neat and being able to search what a program can do like that looks to be very damn useful. The only thing I didn't catch was the key combo to fire it up.

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    • #3
      Sadly it looks shit as do all the other Qt-based widgets. They are perpetually stuck in 1990s and legacy UX. GTK is where the innovation happens and that's why I'm also migrating from developing Qt apps to dedicating my time for GTK.

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      • #4
        If someone programs with several toolkits, in the end Qt can be seen as much better documented, easier and wider-scoped than other toolkits, so...
        • Vlc was migrated to Qt.
        • UnigineEditor was migrated to Qt widgets (native look and feel, faster; https://developer.unigine.com/en/dev...09-unigine-2.0).
        • Blizzard: The use of Qt for developing Blizzard's new game launcher "battle.net".
        • Also Wireshark, GCompris, OpenShot, Renderdoc, Octave, LXQt, Tribler, Dolphin Emulator, Rapid-Photo-Downloader, KernelShark, Audacious, etc.
        Last edited by Nth_man; 22 May 2021, 10:01 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by curfew View Post
          Sadly it looks shit as do all the other Qt-based widgets. They are perpetually stuck in 1990s and legacy UX. GTK is where the innovation happens and that's why I'm also migrating from developing Qt apps to dedicating my time for GTK.
          The innovation of widget styling? Wow!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by curfew View Post
            Sadly it looks shit as do all the other Qt-based widgets. They are perpetually stuck in 1990s and legacy UX. GTK is where the innovation happens and that's why I'm also migrating from developing Qt apps to dedicating my time for GTK.
            GTK3/4 isn't perfect as well. Touch-focused (unnecesarily) and full of bloat (CSD). At least gtk3-classic fixes the things a bit.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by curfew View Post
              Sadly it looks shit as do all the other Qt-based widgets. They are perpetually stuck in 1990s and legacy UX. GTK is where the innovation happens and that's why I'm also migrating from developing Qt apps to dedicating my time for GTK.
              Funny. I personally find GTK 90's looking while Qt looks a lot more modern.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Nth_man View Post
                If someone programs with several toolkits, in the end Qt can be seen as much better documented, easier and wider-scoped than other toolkits, so...
                • Vlc was migrated to Qt.
                • UnigineEditor was migrated to Qt widgets (native look and feel, faster; https://developer.unigine.com/en/dev...09-unigine-2.0).
                • Blizzard: The use of Qt for developing Blizzard's new game launcher "battle.net".
                • Also Wireshark, GCompris, OpenShot, Renderdoc, Octave, LXQt, Tribler, Dolphin Emulator, Rapid-Photo-Downloader, KernelShark, Audacious, etc.
                What about Chromium and Firefox which are not only orders of magnitude more popular, but also have insane budget and enormous engineering teams?

                The reality is that those 2 frameworks don't fulfill the same roll. GTK is a UI toolkit while QT is a whole ecosystem. There is QT Network, QT Bluetooth, QT NFC, QT Print, QT Speech, QT Serial Bus, QT XML, etc.

                When a big cross-platform app needs a UI framework for Linux or when an app only needs a UI, they will tend to gravitate towards GTK as it is simpler whereas QT is more useful as the whole foundation for your app where it can save you lots of time. Or they build their own (Blender) .
                Last edited by kvuj; 22 May 2021, 01:19 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kvuj View Post
                  When a big cross-platform app needs a UI framework for Linux or when an app only needs a UI, they will tend to gravitate towards GTK as it is simpler whereas QT is more useful as the whole foundation for your app where it can save you lots of time. Or they build their own (Blender) .
                  The LGPL license vs the GPL plays a big role.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by zoomblab View Post
                    The LGPL license vs the GPL plays a big role.
                    And how does that play a role? Qt have been LGPL for over 12 years.

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