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The Story Of PipeWire & How It's Getting Ready To Handle Linux Audio + Video

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  • The Story Of PipeWire & How It's Getting Ready To Handle Linux Audio + Video

    Phoronix: The Story Of PipeWire & How It's Getting Ready To Handle Linux Audio + Video

    For those interested in the story of PipeWire for handling Linux audio/video needs not only for the Linux desktop itself but coming to cars / infotainment systems and more, there is an interesting Red Hat interview going over the history and other topics pertaining to PipeWire...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...Interview-2021

  • #2
    How's the latency compared to Jack? I've heard it's not as good...
    ## VGA ##
    AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
    Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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    • #3
      this title is a bad omen

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      • #4
        Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
        How's the latency compared to Jack? I've heard it's not as good...
        https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/pipewire/pipewire/-/wikis/Performance#latency

        On internal PCI cards, latency is comparable to JACK.

        Since 0.3.24(nearly 2 months), latency can be made comparable to JACK on USB devices as well. The measurements listed here are older ones. Stay tuned for updated latency numbers.
        Last edited by Toggleton; 15 May 2021, 07:26 AM.

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        • #5
          It's been here on ArchLinux for a while now, works fine. They've really made sure that it's compatible.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
            How's the latency compared to Jack? I've heard it's not as good...
            Also, while PipeWire can manage the same latency as JACK we are not yet as reliable. So there is some more work to do.

            From the related article.

            As a general user of the audio aspect of desktop linux (simple music and video usage and occassional low end game), I don't understand what this is attempting to do for me, after PulseAudio replaced something that already worked. I DO know that a recent Manjaro update completetly fucked my audio, yet thankfully a simple PulseAudio reinstall fixed that.
            Hi

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            • #7
              Just upgraded to Fedora 34 today. While speaker output is working for my bluetooth headset, microphone input isn't. Hope this gets fixed soon...

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              • #8
                I tried it and it worked pretty well. It currently presents some problems with my hardware so I'm back to PulseAudio. Also it lacks an echo-cancel module, I hope they add it soon.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by stiiixy View Post

                  Also, while PipeWire can manage the same latency as JACK we are not yet as reliable. So there is some more work to do.

                  From the related article.

                  As a general user of the audio aspect of desktop linux (simple music and video usage and occassional low end game), I don't understand what this is attempting to do for me, after PulseAudio replaced something that already worked. I DO know that a recent Manjaro update completetly fucked my audio, yet thankfully a simple PulseAudio reinstall fixed that.
                  Not for you, but for pro-users. They want something "as easy and manageable as pulse audio, but with latencies of JACK". JACK is a nightmare to configure. Also has all the features of pulse and works as a drop in replacement so things like bluetooth audio "just work" without too much hassle.

                  Why? Linux has the potential to be a massive audio powerhouse if there is a low latency, reliable, professional audio system. Pair with networking stack, various storage technologies and proven scalability on servers and high-performance compute environments and OpenCL, with as much as a super powerful audio system, Linux workstations have the potential to be serious business audio work stations.

                  Large scale attached storage for endless libraries of music and music related meta-content, especially high quality lossless. I.e. entire collection of masters for an artist or even record label. OpenCL for encoding/transcoding into whatever format is needed.

                  Its also an OS that can scale down into embedded as well. So everything from DJ mixing consoles, to audio mastering, to high end audio devices, to live sound processing and mixing boards for bands or movies. The sky is the limit.

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                  • #10
                    I am on F34 and I must say, that it works now in 95 out of 100 cases. I still have some issues with Signal. It always "forgets" my Sound settings.

                    Also I hear from friends, that bluetooth is still very troublesome ...

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