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AV1 Decoder dav1d Lands 10-bit AVX2 Assembly For Big Speed-Up, Thanks Facebook + Netflix

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  • evil_core
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    I used to frequent rarbg up until recently - a majority of rips are still in H.264/AVC. Don't know which scene H.265 dominates but I definitely haven't felt or seen it. :-)
    Average computer user is average(to not say dumb) and lazy.
    They use old software (whichever were provided with their machine, like in the past it was Windows + Internet Explorer + Windows Media Player), so they have limited choice of codecs. And often they want to copy it to their phone/tablet with stock firmware, so they are limited to software and codecs to what was provided with them.
    Even few years ago DVDRips dominated and very often people preferred crappy, nearly 4GB MPEG2 DVDRips as ISOs, because it was easy to burn and worked "everywhere" (it stopped only because of streaming and lack of optical drives in modern machines).

    But as I said, HEVC is native to UHD and UHD/4K RIPs are 99% HEVC rips (and other are reencodes, except some AV1 netflix stream dumps). But as most people don't care, they usually download whatever first appear in download search(in their preferred language), so older RIPs stays for years.

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  • birdie
    replied
    Originally posted by evil_core View Post

    WTF?

    HEVC, aka h265 / x265 is very popular on pirate sites for FullHD content and dominates UHD content (HEVC is native for UHD BluRays)
    I used to frequent rarbg up until recently - a majority of rips are still in H.264/AVC. Don't know which scene H.265 dominates but I definitely haven't felt or seen it. :-)

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  • evil_core
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    For personal use it's basically free. You have to pay for it once you start implementing it in HW, software or start distributing VVC content.

    HEVC didn't take off not because of its licensing but because pirates and porn industry didn't embrace it. It's kind of a joke, except it's not, these two industries were the driving force behind most recent successful codecs, MPEG-4 part 2 (Xvid, DivX) and H.264/AVC.

    As for AV2 it'll be extremely computationally expensive again, IOW inaccessible for most users out there. Google still barely uses AV1 which was finalized over a year ago. And we have zero good encoders for AV1 either (libaom is dead slow, SVT-AV1 is faster but blurry and is not good for transparent encoding). I tried to reproduce the same quality as H.264 and the SVT-AV1 encode ended up being ... larger than the H.264 encode.
    WTF?

    HEVC, aka h265 / x265 is very popular on pirate sites for FullHD content and dominates UHD content (HEVC is native for UHD BluRays)

    Leave a comment:


  • sandy8925
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    For personal use it's basically free. You have to pay for it once you start implementing it in HW, software or start distributing VVC content.

    HEVC didn't take off not because of its licensing but because pirates and porn industry didn't embrace it. It's kind of a joke, except it's not, these two industries were the driving force behind most recent successful codecs, MPEG-4 part 2 (Xvid, DivX) and H.264/AVC.

    As for AV2 it'll be extremely computationally expensive again, IOW inaccessible for most users out there. Google still barely uses AV1 which was finalized over a year ago. And we have zero good encoders for AV1 either (libaom is dead slow, SVT-AV1 is faster but blurry and is not good for transparent encoding). I tried to reproduce the same quality as H.264 and the SVT-AV1 encode ended up being ... larger than the H.264 encode.
    Well actually, you can see quite a few pirated videos in HEVC on torrent sites. Mostly transcoded from Bluray.

    Leave a comment:


  • sandy8925
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

    Nah, Bandwidth is very much a thing in short supply for many people. for instance, there are many public places where I can get a smooth video stream, when I stream youtube AV1 where I would have to let it buffer before.

    On youtube AV1 videos are often literally half the size of vp9 videos, this is from yt-dl of an 8k video so you can see file size comps. if you are on data, or have slow internet, AV1 is phenomenal



    EDIT: I also like seeing how the 8k videos have two different bitrates but same codec.
    Sure, but you'll have much worse power consumption and battery life. I guess it depends on what's more important to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • birdie
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

    what is VVC's licensing? that's what killed hevc on the www for the most case, I have high hopes for AV2, but that is a long way off. im not sure of the state of VVC, but if it doesn't have good licensing, it doesn't matter.
    For personal use it's basically free. You have to pay for it once you start implementing it in HW, software or start distributing VVC content.

    HEVC didn't take off not because of its licensing but because pirates and porn industry didn't embrace it. It's kind of a joke, except it's not, these two industries were the driving force behind most recent successful codecs, MPEG-4 part 2 (Xvid, DivX) and H.264/AVC.

    As for AV2 it'll be extremely computationally expensive again, IOW inaccessible for most users out there. Google still barely uses AV1 which was finalized over a year ago. And we have zero good encoders for AV1 either (libaom is dead slow, SVT-AV1 is faster but blurry and is not good for transparent encoding). I tried to reproduce the same quality as H.264 and the SVT-AV1 encode ended up being ... larger than the H.264 encode.
    Last edited by birdie; 16 May 2021, 02:46 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

    I am pretty sure you will have to pay royalties to use/implement VVC, and they will be at least 10 times more expensive than the HEVC royalties.
    Yikes, Im sure that will be a deal breaker. the main reason HEVC was not implemented on the web widely is because of licensing, it was hasslesome for everyone to implement and in the end, it wasn't worth implementing to any serious degree. If this is true, looks like VVC will be another HEVC.

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post



    what is VVC's licensing? that's what killed hevc on the www for the most case, I have high hopes for AV2, but that is a long way off. im not sure of the state of VVC, but if it doesn't have good licensing, it doesn't matter.
    I am pretty sure you will have to pay royalties to use/implement VVC, and they will be at least 10 times more expensive than the HEVC royalties.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

    Comparing VVC to AV1 is like comparing HEVC to VP9.

    It's meant to be like this:

    AV2 > VVC > AV1 > HEVC > VP9 > H.264 > VP8 and so on.
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    I presume the next AVC will be VVC. AV1 seems like yet another codec solely for distributing pre-recorded content over the Internet, i.e. aside from Google and maybe Netflix no one will use it. Google/Twitch/all other content providers continue to use AVC for real-time content. Neither VP9, nor H.265 is used for real-time content/encoding.
    what is VVC's licensing? that's what killed hevc on the www for the most case, I have high hopes for AV2, but that is a long way off. im not sure of the state of VVC, but if it doesn't have good licensing, it doesn't matter.

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    VVC beats AV1 handily: a much better encoding efficiency, a lot faster at both encoding and decoding. For archival purposes it's a much better codec.
    Comparing VVC to AV1 is like comparing HEVC to VP9.

    It's meant to be like this:

    AV2 > VVC > AV1 > HEVC > VP9 > H.264 > VP8 and so on.

    Leave a comment:

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