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LibreOffice Merges Initial Support For Compiling To WebAssembly

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    Quackdoc
    Senior Member

  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by SWY1985 View Post
    I'm not familiar with WASM enough, though it's been in the news a lot recently. Can someone tell me, is it really only limited to browsers or would it be possible to, say, write a WASM interpreter outside the browser that would work on (for example) Haiku? That way, it would be like a 'universal binary' thing. That might be valuable.
    WASM, or webassembly is very preformant tech designed for the internet, to produce as native speeds as possible. (A great example is copy.sh/v86) (Anotherone is ffmpegwasm) Its possible that a "Universal Binary" could be made, but TBH it would be better to download a self contained "website" that would run the wasm (Wasm is all run locally afterall). in that way, any browser would support it. and so long as your OS has a wasm capable browsers you would be set.

    Its not necessarily a great thing to rely on, but for the vast majority of devs, is a no brainer, especially considering that even IOS supports webassembly.

    I heard that someone tried getting wasmer (The closest thing to a universal packaging solution) to work on haiku, but have no idea if anything came of it.

    Leave a comment:

  • oiaohm
    Senior Member

  • oiaohm
    replied
    Originally posted by danmcgrew View Post
    "...LibreOffice 7.2 is also bringing a number of improvements to its Writer word processor..."--Michael Larabel

    Anything (certainly NOT everything) to keep you off-balance and distracted from demanding the ONE item which The Document Foundation has been expert at from the very beginning, and NOT doing for twelve years now: providing absolute compatibility with Microsoft Word / Office.

    But every "new" release contains so many new features and improvements, boys and girls...
    Sorry history of libreoffice releases have particular releases that are bug fix only no new features in one of the individual parts including this one where math and base are getting no new features in 7.2. Yes it while while since we have seen a no new features release for the writer part but it has happened.

    MS Office does not have absolute compatibility with itself. One of the features that is missed about libreoffice is the fact along as either fonts were embedded or the systems at both end have the same fonts the documents you see other than bugs differences that are avoided if you are on the same version look the same with ODF. MS Office you document can change appearance just because you are using a different OS or different printer even if you are on exactly the same ms office version this does bring hell to making absolute compatibility.

    Leave a comment:

  • danmcgrew
    Senior Member

  • danmcgrew
    replied
    Originally posted by Uncle H.

    ...Anyone who uses Microsoft products is completely irrelevant to me...

    At the risk pf bursting your bubble, along with the millions of other self-centered, clueless sheep--IT'S NOT ABOUT YOU. IT NEVER HAS BEEN.


    See what a breath of fresh air enlightenment provides?

    Signed,

    A dedicated Linux user.

    Leave a comment:

  • danmcgrew
    Senior Member

  • danmcgrew
    replied
    "...LibreOffice 7.2 is also bringing a number of improvements to its Writer word processor..."--Michael Larabel

    Anything (certainly NOT everything) to keep you off-balance and distracted from demanding the ONE item which The Document Foundation has been expert at from the very beginning, and NOT doing for twelve years now: providing absolute compatibility with Microsoft Word / Office.

    But every "new" release contains so many new features and improvements, boys and girls...

    These people are beyond pathetic.

    Leave a comment:

  • bug77
    Senior Member

  • bug77
    replied
    Originally posted by SWY1985 View Post
    I'm not familiar with WASM enough, though it's been in the news a lot recently. Can someone tell me, is it really only limited to browsers or would it be possible to, say, write a WASM interpreter outside the browser that would work on (for example) Haiku? That way, it would be like a 'universal binary' thing. That might be valuable.
    It can be a universal binary, but it's very low level and the tooling around it sucks.
    I think there's promise to wasm, but it's far too early to jump onto the bandwagon just because.

    Leave a comment:

  • Mario Junior
    Senior Member

  • Mario Junior
    replied
    Originally posted by caligula View Post

    It provides platform independence. The app will look the same (not native) on every platform. Also a bit slower than native, and larger memory usage.
    So they need to remove the "Assembly" for the name and use "bloat mess shi*" instead.

    Leave a comment:

  • zoomblab
    Senior Member

  • zoomblab
    replied
    Based on my research on wasm, a promising technology, it is best suited as an standard based integration layer for modules written in different languages but compiled into a common target. For example integrating modules of C/C++ or (god forbid) Rust code in the browser. Or integrating C/C++ code into Nodejs. So far at least it doesn't seem fitting as a target for first class full fledged applications, because it still misses important features such as threads, simd and exceptions. Also, the specification, does not include standard means for using and interacting with the apis of the platform that hosts wasm, e.g. browser and posix; though people are working on that issue and until now emscripten is used as an alternative.

    With all that I want to conclude that maybe it would be more useful if they used wasm as a way to glue 3d party code into LO than porting the whole thing to it. But I could be wrong of course.

    Leave a comment:

  • miskol
    Phoronix Member

  • miskol
    replied
    Originally posted by SWY1985 View Post
    I'm not familiar with WASM enough, though it's been in the news a lot recently. Can someone tell me, is it really only limited to browsers or would it be possible to, say, write a WASM interpreter outside the browser that would work on (for example) Haiku? That way, it would be like a 'universal binary' thing. That might be valuable.
    For now you can run any Qt app in browser. But it still depened on APIs that you really need to run app

    Leave a comment:

  • jacob
    Senior Member

  • jacob
    replied
    Originally posted by SWY1985 View Post
    I'm not familiar with WASM enough, though it's been in the news a lot recently. Can someone tell me, is it really only limited to browsers or would it be possible to, say, write a WASM interpreter outside the browser that would work on (for example) Haiku? That way, it would be like a 'universal binary' thing. That might be valuable.
    In theory WASM is just a particular bytecode. In practice it's 100% oriented towards the web/cloud. It can run on everything including Haiku provided that a JITter is implemented on it, but don't hold your breath for any kind of universal binaries. That doesn't really work (remember Java's promises?) and when it does, it's badly integrated and inferior. The most valuable solution for Haiku is native Haiku apps, not another rube-goldberg "cross platform" contraption.

    Leave a comment:

  • SWY1985
    Phoronix Member

  • SWY1985
    replied
    I'm not familiar with WASM enough, though it's been in the news a lot recently. Can someone tell me, is it really only limited to browsers or would it be possible to, say, write a WASM interpreter outside the browser that would work on (for example) Haiku? That way, it would be like a 'universal binary' thing. That might be valuable.

    Leave a comment:

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