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PipeWire 0.3.26 Released With Better Bluetooth Support, Up To 64 Channel Devices

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  • #41
    Let met just reiterate what I said last time: PipeWire is promising, but it's simply too early for a broad rollout. It's experimental software at this point, and should be treated as such. It's rapidly improving in many ways, but I would have waited before Fedora 35 to roll it out. Look at the issue tracker and what people in this thread report: there are still many major issues.

    I have a major issue with the latest release 0.3.26 as well: it randomly won't recognize my integrated audio. I have to restart PipeWire for this to work, sometimes several times. This is a new issue, it didn't happen in 0.3.25.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
      I have tried many times to use pipewire on Arch, it just does not see any device on my system. Tried every instruction in the wiki, googled for help, nothing. So i don't understand how people can say that they don't need pulseaudio again. It is certainly not ready yet.
      There was a config change i would guess a month ago and that did brick many arch installs. Check if in /etc/pipewire are .packnew files and replace the old .conf files with the pacnew files (did use pacdiff for it https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php...ew_and_Pacsave )

      and try this
      https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php..._/_%3E=0.3.23) The same is written in the PW wiki

      to check the log of pipewire for errors - journalctl --user -b -u pipewire-pulse

      and to restart pipewire - systemctl restart --user pipewire-pulse pipewire
      and you need to run after that - systemctl --user daemon-reload

      you should, if you run pw-top in the terminal, see the audio devices and what Application is using them. If not then there is some problem with your install.

      Do use pipewire-git since i guess 2 months now on a not that complex setup (Desktop switching between headphones and speakers) and it works fine for me except a problem that there are sometimes popping sounds if pavucontrol is open.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by brent View Post
        Let met just reiterate what I said last time: PipeWire is promising, but it's simply too early for a broad rollout.
        Yup, that's why it hasn't yet replaced Pulseaudio as the default Linux audio system. Fedora enabling it as default can hardly be considered as a "broad rollout".

        It's experimental software at this point, and should be treated as such.
        Pre-beta quality? Sure. "Experimental"? Not at all. Pipewire has a very robust architecture and even in the state it is now, for a great many use cases it Just Works™. Case in point my system, which has happily replaced Pulseaudio with Pipewire since version 0.3.18 or so. There are still some bugs and regressions with each release that make it unsuitable yet for the average Joe, but these will be fixed sooner or later, and it's otherwise very robust.

        there are still many major issues.
        Of course, that's why Pipewire is considered as Alpha/Pre-beta and not even remotely ready for wider desktop adoption. But that's also why it's being enabled now in Fedora: so that people who've consciously chosen a bleeding edge distro as their distro of choice can report bugs and broken use cases, so that they can be fixed.

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        • #44
          Originally posted by darkbasic View Post

          I did enable updates-testing but unfortunately it still crashes with 0.3.26. I would love to be able to provide an usable stack trace but unfortunately the instructions to run it from the build directory don't work for me: applications don't see any audio device.
          How did you get pipewire? Fresh install of 34? Upgrade from 33 to 34? Still on 33 and installed 34?

          In my case I was still on 33 and used this command. The allow erasing was important to remove the pure pulse stuff so they don't conflict. Do you have all of those packages? Maybe run that command with reinstall instead of install.

          dnf install pipewire-pulseaudio pipewire-utils pipewire-gstreamer --allowerasing

          Does dmesg or lspci show your devices?

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          • #45
            Originally posted by MadeUpName View Post

            How did you get pipewire? Fresh install of 34?
            It's a fresh install and pipewire works flawlessly from the Fedora packages. It doesn't work when I try to follow the instructions at https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/pipew...ter/INSTALL.md and run it from the build directory. This is necessary in order to debug it.
            ## VGA ##
            AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
            Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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            • #46
              Originally posted by Alexmitter View Post

              Nice, who cares? KDE sure is able to fix their own stuff.
              I care, as a KDE user. Also, it's happening because PipeWire still lacks a lot of functions that exist in PulseAudio now. GNOME just too stupid and primitive to have any issue.

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              • #47
                pipewire 0.3.26-1 was pushed to the F34 repo over night if any one trying F34 is still having issues or needs the new functionality.

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by caligula View Post

                  Yea.. well the expectations have grown quite a lot. Some 20 years ago I didn't even use VOIP software. I had SB Live 5.1 with analog stereo speakers. The most demanding use cases were EAX 5.1 sound when playing games, AC3 passthrough (no software mixing at all), and simple stereo in/out with at most two sound sources (mp3 player & internet videos). I had to launch all videos with 3rd party media player since the browser plugins were a bit buggy. Now.. my normal desktop is basically a lightweight DAW with multiple sound cards and other audio interfaces.
                  You are wrong, very wrong.

                  Every emu10kx chipset got decent support under Linux, including hw mixing(there was special OpenAL version and EAX extensions, and ALSA/OSS used hardware mixing by default then). There was multitude of tools that suported on-board Digital Sound Processor, including WaveTable support (hw MIDI with loadable soundFonts). check AweSFX.

                  Every PCI SB Live!, Audigy, Audigy2, were based upon emu10k1 or emu10k2 chipset, so it was way-cheaper, consumer version of professional E-MU DSPs, with cheap ADC (but still good enough DACs).

                  I've still got box of Audigy cards, with dedicated front panel units, that 've been used in every non-laptop machine in my family, when PCI was still a thing.

                  I loved them, because of Hardware Mixer, so I hadn't to use DMIX that caused problems(latency, cracky sound, and higher CPU-usage).
                  And with WaveTable, I could use DosBOX and ScummVM games with it(didn't have to use Timidity, that used CPU for that).

                  I hated PulseAudio, becaue it didn't use hw mixer, so it used CPU (something around 12% with few apps running. like dmix on poor AthlonXP)

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                  • #49
                    Originally posted by evil_core View Post

                    You are wrong, very wrong.

                    Every emu10kx chipset got decent support under Linux, including hw mixing(there was special OpenAL version and EAX extensions, and ALSA/OSS used hardware mixing by default then). There was multitude of tools that suported on-board Digital Sound Processor, including WaveTable support (hw MIDI with loadable soundFonts). check AweSFX.

                    Every PCI SB Live!, Audigy, Audigy2, were based upon emu10k1 or emu10k2 chipset, so it was way-cheaper, consumer version of professional E-MU DSPs, with cheap ADC (but still good enough DACs).

                    I've still got box of Audigy cards, with dedicated front panel units, that 've been used in every non-laptop machine in my family, when PCI was still a thing.

                    I loved them, because of Hardware Mixer, so I hadn't to use DMIX that caused problems(latency, cracky sound, and higher CPU-usage).
                    And with WaveTable, I could use DosBOX and ScummVM games with it(didn't have to use Timidity, that used CPU for that).
                    I still have a Sound Blaster Audigy (SB0090), which I've got many many years ago. It is still in use to this day and went from computer to computer. It worked/works with Windows 9x, NT 4, 2000, 7 and several Linux distris without problems and without having to set up anything. However I did not install the Sound Blaster software but the driver from kX Project, which was way better then the Sound Blaster stuff (that was always awful).

                    Its hardware DSP is - in one word - amazing: you can wire up all inputs, outputs, effects in hardware and have a completely hardware accelerated sound mixer, a whole mixing studio:



                    I dread the day my mainboard doesn't have PCI slots anymore.

                    When ISA ceased to exist, my Pro Audio Spectrum 16 went into the box. Sad day, it was supported by nearly all games so strong was its market presence, along the SB16 et al.
                    Last edited by reba; 26 April 2021, 01:48 AM.

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                    • #50
                      Originally posted by reba View Post

                      I still have a Sound Blaster Audigy (SB0090), which I've got many many years ago. It is still in use to this day and went from computer to computer. It worked/works with Windows 9x, NT 4, 2000, 7 and several Linux distris without problems and without having to set up anything. However I did not install the Sound Blaster software but the driver from kX Project, which was way better then the Sound Blaster stuff (that was always awful).

                      Its hardware DSP is - in one word - amazing: you can wire up all inputs, outputs, effects in hardware and have a completely hardware accelerated sound mixer, a whole mixing studio:



                      I dread the day my mainboard doesn't have PCI slots anymore.

                      When ISA ceased to exist, my Pro Audio Spectrum 16 went into the box. Sad day, it was supported by nearly all games so strong was its market presence, along the SB16 et al.
                      I bought Silverstone TJ-11 yesterday (still in the transit) with 9 PCI slot extensions, meaning that if I got motherboard with less, I can use cheap PCIe 1.x extension bracket (like for mining) and anapter for PCI.
                      So if you got wider computer case than your motherboard, got for it. It's cheap (especially on Aliexpress).
                      There were one for ISA too! (in the past, I guess there are still. But you can be forced to backport old kernel driver [if there were any for linux])
                      Last edited by evil_core; 26 April 2021, 06:39 AM.

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